1599: A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare

Author: James Shapiro

Publisher: Faber & Faber

ISBN: 0571266428

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 336

View: 6548

How did Shakespeare go from being a talented poet and playwright to become one of the greatest writers who ever lived? In this one exhilarating year we follow what he reads and writes, what he saw and who he worked with as he invests in the new Globe theatre and creates four of his most famous plays - Henry V, Julius Caesar, As You Like It, and, most remarkably, Hamlet. This book brings the news, intrigue and flavour of the times together with wonderful detail about how Shakespeare worked as an actor, businessman and playwright, to create an exceptionally immediate and gripping account of an inspiring moment in history.

A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare

1599

Author: James Shapiro

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0061840904

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 432

View: 6329

1599 was an epochal year for Shakespeare and England Shakespeare wrote four of his most famous plays: Henry the Fifth, Julius Caesar, As You Like It, and, most remarkably, Hamlet; Elizabethans sent off an army to crush an Irish rebellion, weathered an Armada threat from Spain, gambled on a fledgling East India Company, and waited to see who would succeed their aging and childless queen. James Shapiro illuminates both Shakespeare’s staggering achievement and what Elizabethans experienced in the course of 1599, bringing together the news and the intrigue of the times with a wonderful evocation of how Shakespeare worked as an actor, businessman, and playwright. The result is an exceptionally immediate and gripping account of an inspiring moment in history.

Shakespeare

die Biographie

Author: Peter Ackroyd

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783442738496

Category:

Page: 654

View: 3102

Shakespeares ruhelose Welt

Author: Neil MacGregor

Publisher: C.H.Beck

ISBN: 3406652883

Category: History

Page: 347

View: 4641

Während Shakespeare unvergängliche Werke wie «Romeo und Julia», «Hamlet» oder «Othello» schrieb, ging die Welt durch eine Epoche tiefgreifender Veränderungen. Seit der Entdeckung Amerikas hatten sich die Horizonte Europas dramatisch erweitert, die Reformation spaltete die Christenheit, ein ganzes Weltbild geriet ins Wanken. Neil MacGregor führt uns mitten hinein in diese aufregende Zeit – und mitten hinein in die Stücke William Shakespeares. Ob er uns das Schwert eines Edelmanns oder die Wollmütze eines Handwerksburschen, einen Glaskelch aus Venedig oder Münzen aus Marrakesch vorstellt – immer weiß Neil MacGregor in den zwanzig Kapiteln dieses Buches eines der Themen zu illuminieren, die Shakespeares Zeitalter prägten: die Globalisierung, die Glaubenskämpfe, die Pest, der Islam, die Magie – und uns zugleich vertraut zu machen mit einem der aufregendsten Dichter der Weltliteratur. Das Resultat ist ein hinreißend lebendiges, glänzend geschriebenes und in vielem überraschendes Portrait der gefährlich aufgewühlten Welt von William Shakespeare.

Truth About William Shakespeare

Author: David Ellis

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748653880

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 9297

A polemical attack on the ways recent Shakespeare biographers have disguised their lack of information

The Life of William Shakespeare

A Critical Biography

Author: Lois Potter

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118231775

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 504

View: 8648

The Life of William Shakespeare is a fascinating and wide-ranging exploration of Shakespeare's life and works focusing on oftern neglected literary and historical contexts: what Shakespeare read, who he worked with as an author and an actor, and how these various collaborations may have affected his writing. Written by an eminent Shakespearean scholar and experienced theatre reviewer Pays particular attention to Shakespeare's theatrical contemporaries and the ways in which they influenced his writing Offers an intriguing account of the life and work of the great poet-dramatist structured around the idea of memory Explores often neglected literary and historical contexts that illuminate Shakespeare's life and works

Shakespeare and the Truth of Love

The Mystery of 'The Phoenix and Turtle'

Author: J. Bednarz

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230393322

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 251

View: 6423

A comprehensive study of Shakespeare's forgotten masterpiece The Phoenix and Turtle . Bednarz confronts the question of why one of the greatest poems in the English language is customarily ignored or misconstrued by Shakespeare biographers, literary historians, and critics.

Ben Jonson

A Life

Author: Ian Donaldson

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191636797

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 560

View: 5648

Ben Jonson was the greatest of Shakespeare's contemporaries. In the century following his death he was seen by many as the finest of all English writers, living or dead. His fame rested not only on the numerous plays he had written for the theatre, but on his achievements over three decades as principal masque-writer to the early Stuart court, where he had worked in creative, and often stormy, collaboration with Inigo Jones. One of the most accomplished poets of the age, he had become - in fact if not in title - the first Poet Laureate in England. Jonson's life was full of drama. Serving in the Low Countries as a young man, he overcame a Spanish adversary in single combat in full view of both the armies. His early satirical play, The Isle of Dogs, landed him in prison, and brought all theatrical activity in London to a temporary — and very nearly to a permanent — standstill. He was 'almost at the gallows' for killing a fellow actor after a quarrel, and converted to Catholicism while awaiting execution. He supped with the Gunpowder conspirators on the eve of their planned coup at Westminster. After satirizing the Scots in Eastward Ho! he was imprisoned again; and throughout his career was repeatedly interrogated about plays and poems thought to contain seditious or slanderous material. In his middle years, twenty stone in weight, he walked to Scotland and back, seemingly partly to fulfil a wager, and partly to see the land of his forebears. He travelled in Europe as tutor to the mischievous son of Sir Walter Ralegh, who 'caused him to be drunken and dead drunk' and wheeled provocatively through the streets of Paris. During his later years he presided over a sociable club in the Apollo Room in Fleet Street, mixed with the most learned scholars of his day, and viewed with keen interest the political, religious, and scientific controversies of the day. Ian Donaldson's new biography draws on freshly discovered writings by and about Ben Jonson, and locates his work within the social and intellectual contexts of his time. Jonson emerges from this study as a more complex and volatile character than his own self-declarations (and much modern scholarship) would allow, and as a writer whose work strikingly foresees - and at times pre-emptively satirizes - the modern age.

Will in der Welt

Wie Shakespeare zu Shakespeare wurde

Author: Stephen Greenblatt

Publisher: Pantheon Verlag

ISBN: 3641156149

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 512

View: 6295

Shakespeare ist wohl der bekannteste Dramatiker aller Zeiten, doch über sein Leben wissen wir so gut wie nichts. Kein Brief blieb von ihm erhalten, wir kennen nur ein paar dürre Lebensdaten, vereinzelte Schriftsätze aus Prozessen, die er betrieb – und ein überaus nüchternes Testament, in dem er seiner Frau sein zweitbestes Bett vermacht. In seiner hochgelobten Biographie versucht Stephen Greenblatt mit detektivischem Scharfsinn, die Lücken dieser Lebensgeschichte zu füllen und hinter das Geheimnis zu kommen, wie aus einem talentierten Jungen aus einer englischen Kleinstadt der größte Dramatiker aller Zeiten werden konnte, kurz: wie Shakespeare zu Shakespeare wurde.

Adapting King Lear for the Stage

Author: Dr Lynne Bradley

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409476162

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 280

View: 2968

Questioning whether the impulse to adapt Shakespeare has changed over time, Lynne Bradley argues for restoring a sense of historicity to the study of adaptation. Bradley compares Nahum Tate's History of King Lear (1681), adaptations by David Garrick in the mid-eighteenth century, and nineteenth-century Shakespeare burlesques to twentieth-century theatrical rewritings of King Lear, and suggests latter-day adaptations should be viewed as a unique genre that allows playwrights to express modern subject positions with regard to their literary heritage while also participating in broader debates about art and society. In identifying and relocating different adaptive gestures within this historical framework, Bradley explores the link between the critical and the creative in the history of Shakespearean adaptation. Focusing on works such as Gordon Bottomley's King Lear's Wife (1913), Edward Bond's Lear (1971), Howard Barker's Seven Lears (1989), and the Women's Theatre Group's Lear's Daughters (1987), Bradley theorizes that modern rewritings of Shakespeare constitute a new type of textual interaction based on a simultaneous double-gesture of collaboration and rejection. She suggests that this new interaction provides constituent groups, such as the feminist collective who wrote Lear's Daughters, a strategy to acknowledge their debt to Shakespeare while writing against the traditional and negative representations of femininity they see reflected in his plays.

1606

William Shakespeare and the Year of Lear

Author: James Shapiro

Publisher: Faber & Faber

ISBN: 0571283853

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 352

View: 1971

1606: William Shakespeare and the Year of Lear traces Shakespeare's life and times from the autumn of 1605, when he took an old and anonymous Elizabethan play, The Chronicle History of King Leir, and transformed it into his most searing tragedy, King Lear. 1606 proved to be an especially grim year for England, which witnessed the bloody aftermath of the Gunpowder Plot, divisions over the Union of England and Scotland, and an outbreak of plague. But it turned out to be an exceptional one for Shakespeare, unrivalled at identifying the fault-lines of his cultural moment, who before the year was out went on to complete two other great Jacobean tragedies that spoke directly to these fraught times: Macbeth and Antony and Cleopatra. Following the biographical style of 1599, a way of thinking and writing that Shapiro has made his own, 1606: William Shakespeare and the Year of Lear promises to be one of the most significant and accessible works on Shakespeare in the decade to come.

All That Matters

Author: Ross Fraser

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1473617308

Category: Social Science

Page: 104

View: 1573

Get to the heart of the most talked about topics of our time. All That Matters runs the gamut of the most exciting, interesting and topical subjects of today. To provide a flavour of the All That Matters series, this exclsuive sampler provides the opening chapters from nine notable books including the following: God by Mark Vernon Love by Mark Vernon Water by Paul L. Younger Space Exploration by David Ashford Modern China by Jonanthan Clements Shakespeare's Comedies by Michael Scott Cyber Crime and Warfare by Peter Warren and Michel Streeter Philosophy by Julian Baggini Future Cities by Camilla Ween All That Matters books are written by the world's leading experts, introducing to the quick-minded and curious reader the most important topics and hottest areas of debate on the subjects that really matter.

Butterfly Economics

Author: Paul Ormerod

Publisher: Faber & Faber

ISBN: 0571266134

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 240

View: 9172

What do insects, the weather and chaos theory have to do with the economy? According to Paul Ormerod, everything. The economy is like society itself, he argues: a complex system living on the edge of chaos. Conventional economics has always failed to predict and manage its fluctuations. Governments and businesses need to adopt quite different mindsets and less heavy-handed approaches. Hence 'Butterfly Economics'. 'A fascinating and entertaining introduction to the economics of the 21st century.' New Statesman

Male Friendship in Shakespeare and his Contemporaries

Author: Thomas MacFaul

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139464418

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: N.A

View: 7243

Renaissance Humanism developed a fantasy of friendship in which men can be absolutely equal to one another, but Shakespeare and other dramatists quickly saw through this rhetoric and developed their own ideas about friendship more firmly based on a respect for human difference. They created a series of brilliant and varied fictions for human connection, as often antagonistic as sympathetic, using these as a means for individuals to assert themselves in the face of social domination. Whilst the fantasy of equal and permanent friendship shaped their thinking, dramatists used friendship most effectively as a way of shaping individuality and its limitations. Dealing with a wide range of Shakespeare's plays and poems, and with many works of his contemporaries, this study gives readers a deeper insight into a crucial aspect of Shakespeare's culture and his use of it in art.

Shakespeare Unbound

Decoding a Hidden Life

Author: René Weis

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 1466855096

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 496

View: 4591

At last—a key that unlocks the secrets of Shakespeare's life Intimacies with Southampton and Marlowe, entanglements in London with the elusive dark lady, the probable fathering of an illegitimate son—these are among the mysteries of Shakespeare's rich and turbulent life that have proven tantalizingly obscure. Despite an avalanche of recent scholarship, René Weis, an acknowledged authority on the Elizabethan period, believes the links between the bard's life and the poems and plays have been largely ignored. Armed with a wealth of new archival research and his own highly regarded interpretations of the literature, the author finds provocative parallels between Shakespeare's early experiences in the bustling market town of Stratford—including a dangerous poaching incident and contacts with underground Catholics—and the plays. Breaking with tradition, Weis reveals that it is the plays and poems themselves that contain the richest seam of clues about the details of Shakespeare's personal life, at home in Stratford and in the shadowy precincts of theatrical London—details of a code unbroken for four hundred years.

Young Shakespeare’s Young Hamlet

Print, Piracy, and Performance

Author: T. Bourus

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137465646

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 289

View: 3981

The different versions of Hamlet constitute one of the most vexing puzzles in Shakespeare studies. In this groundbreaking work, Shakespeare scholar Terri Bourus argues that this puzzle can only be solved by drawing on multiple kinds of evidence and analysis, including book and theatre history, biography, performance studies, and close readings.

The Elizabethans

Author: A. N. Wilson

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 1466816198

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 8140

"In Wilson's hands these familiar stories make for gripping reading."—The New York Times Book Review New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice Author of Dante in Love A sweeping panorama of the Elizabethan age, a time of remarkable, strange personages and great political and social change, by one of our most renowned historians A time of exceptional creativity, wealth creation, larger-than-life royalty and political expansion, the Elizabethan age was also more remarkable than any other for the Technicolor personalities of its royals and subjects. Apart from the complex character of the Virgin Queen herself, A. N. Wilson's The Elizabethans follows the stories of Francis Drake, a privateer who not only defeated the Spanish Armada but also circumnavigated the globe with a drunken, mutinous crew and without reliable navigational instruments; political intriguers like William Cecil and Francis Walsingham; and Renaissance literary geniuses from Sir Philip Sidney to Christopher Marlowe and William Shakespeare. Most crucially, this was the age when modern Britain was born and established independence from mainland Europe—both in its resistance to Spanish and French incursions and in its declaration of religious liberty from the pope—and laid the foundations for the explosion of British imperial power and eventual American domination. An acknowledged master of the all-encompassing single-volume history, Wilson tells the exhilarating story of the Elizabethan era with all the panoramic sweep of his bestselling The Victorians, and with the wit and iconoclasm that are his trademarks.

Hamlet

Third Series

Author: William Shakespeare

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1408142899

Category: Drama

Page: 640

View: 4752

The core of the ground-breaking, three text edition, this self-contained, free-standing volume gives readers the Second Quarto text (1604-5) and includes in its Introduction, notes and Appendices all the reader might expect to find in any standard Arden edition. As well as a full Introduction to the play's historical, cultural and performance contexts and a thorough survey of critical approaches to the play, an appendix contains the additional passages found only in the 1623 text."The new Arden Hamlet is a pathbreaking edition, one that promises to change irrevocably our understanding of Shakespeare's greatest play."- Professor James Shapiro, author of 1599: A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare'Hamlet's latest editors have undertaken a heroic task with great skill and thoroughnesss.' - Stanley Wells, The Observer"(The) new Arden Hamlet is quite simply the most comprehensive edition of the play currently available, a status I suspect it will enjoy for many years to come" - The British Theatre Guide"Stunning! There is absolutely no doubt about this being the text to buy if you are studying the play at A Level. And the same stands for those students who will be studying the play at university. This critical edition gives the reader the Second Quarto Text (1604-1605), annotated with intelligence and care, a wealth of historical and cultural references and a survey of different critical approaches to the play."- The Use of English, The English Association

Elizabeth's Bedfellows

An Intimate History of the Queen's Court

Author: Anna Whitelock

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408833638

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 941

Elizabeth I acceded to the throne in 1558, restoring the Protestant faith to England. At the heart of the new queen's court lay Elizabeth's bedchamber, closely guarded by the favoured women who helped her dress, looked after her jewels and shared her bed. Elizabeth's private life was of public, political concern. Her bedfellows were witnesses to the face and body beneath the make-up and elaborate clothes, as well as to rumoured illicit dalliances with such figures as Robert Dudley. Their presence was for security as well as propriety, as the kingdom was haunted by fears of assassination plots and other Catholic subterfuge. For such was the significance of the queen's body: it represented the very state itself. This riveting, revealing history of the politics of intimacy uncovers the feminized world of the Elizabethan court. Between the scandal and intrigue the women who attended the queen were the guardians of the truth about her health, chastity and fertility. Their stories offer extraordinary insight into the daily life of the Elizabethans, the fragility of royal favour and the price of disloyalty.

The Elizabethan Top Ten

Defining Print Popularity in Early Modern England

Author: Dr Andy Kesson,Dr Emma Smith

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1472405870

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 284

View: 662

Engaging with histories of the book and of reading, as well as with studies of material culture, this volume explores ‘popularity’ in early modern English writings. Is ‘popular’ best described as a theoretical or an empirical category in this period? How can we account for the gap between modern canonicity and early modern print popularity? How might we weight the evidence of popularity from citations, serial editions, print runs, reworkings, or extant copies? Is something that sells a lot always popular, even where the readership for print is only a small proportion of the population, or does popular need to carry something of its etymological sense of the public, the people? Four initial chapters sketch out the conceptual and evidential issues, while the second part of the book consists of ten short chapters-a ‘hit parade’- in which eminent scholars take a genre or a single exemplar - play, romance, sermon, or almanac, among other categories-as a means to articulate more general issues. Throughout, the aim is to unpack and interrogate assumptions about the popular, and to decentre canonical narratives about, for example, the sermons of Donne or Andrewes over Smith, or the plays of Shakespeare over Mucedorus. Revisiting Elizabethan literary culture through the lenses of popularity, this collection allows us to view the subject from an unfamiliar angle-in which almanacs are more popular than sonnets and proclamations more numerous than plays, and in which authors familiar to us are displaced by names now often forgotten.