A History of American Magazines: 1741-1850

Author: Frank Luther Mott

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674395503

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 934

View: 9867

"The five volumes of A History of American Magazines constitute a unique cultural history of America, viewed through the pages and pictures of her periodicals from the publication of the first monthly magazine in 1741 through the golden age of magazines in the twentieth century"--Page 4 of cover.

The Oxford History of Popular Print Culture

Author: Christine Bold

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 019923406X

Category: Books and reading

Page: 716

View: 4517

Planned nine-volume series devoted to the exploration of popular print culture in English from the beginning of the sixteenth century to the present.

Writing Celebrity

Stein, Fitzgerald, and the Modern(ist) Art of Self-Fashioning

Author: T. Galow

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230119492

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 235

View: 8956

Writing Celebrity is divided into three major sections. The first part traces the rise of a national celebrity culture in the United States and examines the impact that this culture had on "literary" writing in the decades before World War II. The second two sections of the book demonstrate the relevance of celebrity for literary scholarship by re-evaluating the careers of two major American authors, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein.

Eça de Queirós and the Victorian Press

Author: Teresa Pinto Coelho

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd

ISBN: 185566268X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 227

View: 8031

Focusses on the years that Eça de Queirós lived in Paris and shows how the periodicals he conceived and edited were modeled on dozens of Victorian and American publications.

Mariana Griswold Van Rensselaer

A Landscape Critic in the Gilded Age

Author: Judith K. Major

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813934559

Category: Architecture

Page: 304

View: 5041

Mariana Griswold Van Rensselaer (1851–1934) was one of the premier figures in landscape writing and design at the turn of the twentieth century, a moment when the amateur pursuit of gardening and the increasingly professionalized landscape design field were beginning to diverge. This intellectual biography—the first in-depth study of the versatile critic and author—reveals Van Rensselaer’s vital role in this moment in the history of landscape architecture. Van Rensselaer was one of the new breed of American art and architecture critics, closely examining the nature of her profession and bringing a disciplined scholarship to the craft. She considered herself a professional, leading the effort among women in the Gilded Age to claim the titles of artist, architect, critic, historian, and journalist. Thanks to the resources of her wealthy mercantile family, she had been given a sophisticated European education almost unheard of for a woman of her time. Her close relationship with Frederick Law Olmsted influenced her ideas on landscape gardening, and her interest in botany and geology shaped the ideas upon which her philosophy and art criticism were based. She also studied the works of Charles Darwin, Alexander von Humboldt, Henry David Thoreau, and many other nineteenth-century scientists and nature writers, which influenced her general belief in the relationship between science and the imagination. Her cosmopolitan education and elevated social status gave her, much like her contemporary Edith Wharton, access to the homes and gardens of the upper classes. This allowed her to mingle with authors, artists, and affluent patrons of the arts and enabled her to write with familiarity about architecture and landscape design. Identifying over 330 previously unattributed editorials and unsigned articles authored by Van Rensselaer in the influential journal Garden and Forest—for which she was the sole female editorial voice—Judith Major offers insight into her ideas about the importance of botanical nomenclature, the similarities between landscape gardening and idealist painting, design in nature, and many other significant topics. Major’s critical examination of Van Rensselaer’s life and writings—which also includes selections from her correspondence—details not only her influential role in the creation of landscape architecture as a discipline but also her contribution to a broader public understanding of the arts in America.

A History of Early American Magazines 1741-1789

Author: Lyon Norman Richardson

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 414

View: 571

First Published in 1967. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Art Crusade

An Analysis of American Drawing Manuals, 1820-1860

Author: Peter C. Marzio

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Drawing

Page: 94

View: 6594

The Ordeal of the Reunion

A New History of Reconstruction

Author: Mark Wahlgren Summers

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469617587

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 2936

For a generation, scholarship on the Reconstruction era has rightly focused on the struggles of the recently emancipated for a meaningful freedom and defined its success or failure largely in those terms. In The Ordeal of the Reunion, Mark Wahlgren Summers goes beyond this vitally important question, focusing on Reconstruction's need to form an enduring Union without sacrificing the framework of federalism and republican democracy. Assessing the era nationally, Summers emphasizes the variety of conservative strains that confined the scope of change, highlights the war's impact and its aftermath, and brings the West and foreign policy into an integrated narrative. In sum, this book offers a fresh explanation for Reconstruction's demise and a case for its essential successes as well as its great failures. Indeed, this book demonstrates the extent to which the victors' aims in 1865 were met--and at what cost. Summers depicts not just a heroic, tragic moment with equal rights advanced and then betrayed but a time of achievement and consolidation, in which nationhood and emancipation were placed beyond repeal and the groundwork was laid for a stronger, if not better, America to come.

Writing Reconstruction

Race, Gender, and Citizenship in the Postwar South

Author: Sharon D. Kennedy-Nolle

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469621088

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 428

View: 6022

After the Civil War, the South was divided into five military districts occupied by Union forces. Out of these regions, a remarkable group of writers emerged. Experiencing the long-lasting ramifications of Reconstruction firsthand, many of these writers sought to translate the era's promise into practice. In fiction, newspaper journalism, and other forms of literature, authors including George Washington Cable, Albion Tourgee, Constance Fenimore Woolson, and Octave Thanet imagined a new South in which freedpeople could prosper as citizens with agency. Radically re-envisioning the role of women in the home, workforce, and marketplace, these writers also made gender a vital concern of their work. Still, working from the South, the authors were often subject to the whims of a northern literary market. Their visions of citizenship depended on their readership's deference to conventional claims of duty, labor, reputation, and property ownership. The circumstances surrounding the production and circulation of their writing blunted the full impact of the period's literary imagination and fostered a drift into the stereotypical depictions and other strictures that marked the rise of Jim Crow. Sharon D. Kennedy-Nolle blends literary history with archival research to assess the significance of Reconstruction literature as a genre. Founded on witness and dream, the pathbreaking work of its writers made an enduring, if at times contradictory, contribution to American literature and history.

Jay Cooke's Gamble

The Northern Pacific Railroad, the Sioux, and the Panic of 1873

Author: M. John Lubetkin

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 080614503X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 9894

In 1869, Jay Cooke, the brilliant but idiosyncratic American banker, decided to finance the Northern Pacific, a transcontinental railroad planned from Duluth, Minnesota, to Seattle. M. John Lubetkin tells how Cooke’s gamble reignited war with the Sioux, rescued George Armstrong Custer from obscurity, created Yellowstone Park, pushed frontier settlement four hundred miles westward, and triggered the Panic of 1873. Staking his reputation and wealth on the Northern Pacific, Cooke was soon whipsawed by the railroad’s mismanagement, questionable contracts, and construction problems. Financier J. P. Morgan undermined him, and the Crédit Mobilier scandal ended congressional support. When railroad surveyors and army escorts ignored Sioux chief Sitting Bull’s warning not to enter the Yellowstone Valley, Indian attacks—combined with alcoholic commanders—led to embarrassing setbacks on the field, in the nation’s press, and among investors. Lubetkin’s suspenseful narrative describes events played out from Wall Street to the Yellowstone and vividly portrays the soldiers, engineers, businessmen, politicians, and Native Americans who tried to build or block the Northern Pacific.

The Enduring Vision: A History of the American People, Volume 2: From 1865, Concise

Author: Paul Boyer,Clifford Clark,Sandra Hawley,Joseph Kett,Andrew Rieser

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 0547222785

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 3890

Like its corresponding full-size version, THE ENDURING VISION, CONCISE, is an engaging, elegantly written narrative that emphasizes political, social, and cultural history within a chronological framework. THE ENDURING VISION is known for sustained attention to cultural history, and for innovative coverage of the environment, and the West. The Sixth Edition of THE ENDURING VISION, CONCISE, features a new co-author, Andrew Rieser, new pedagogy, and a beautiful new design. Available in the following split options: THE ENDURING VISION, CONCISE Sixth Edition Complete (Chapters 1-32), ISBN: 0547222807; Volume A: To 1877 (Chapters 1-16), ISBN: 0547222815; Volume B: Since 1865 (Chapters 16-32), ISBN: 0547222785. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

The Peasant Prince

Thaddeus Kosciuszko and the Age of Revolution

Author: Alex Storozynski

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9781429966078

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 1012

Thaddeus Kosciuszko, a Polish-Lithuanian born in 1746, was one of the most important figures of the modern world. Fleeing his homeland after a death sentence was placed on his head (when he dared court a woman above his station), he came to America one month after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, literally showing up on Benjamin Franklin's doorstep in Philadelphia with little more than a revolutionary spirit and a genius for engineering. Entering the fray as a volunteer in the war effort, he quickly proved his capabilities and became the most talented engineer of the Continental Army. Kosciuszko went on to construct the fortifications for Philadelphia, devise battle plans that were integral to the American victory at the pivotal Battle of Saratoga, and designed the plans for Fortress West Point—the same plans that were stolen by Benedict Arnold. Then, seeking new challenges, Kosciuszko asked for a transfer to the Southern Army, where he oversaw a ring of African-American spies. A lifelong champion of the common man and woman, he was ahead of his time in advocating tolerance and standing up for the rights of slaves, Native Americans, women, serfs, and Jews. Following the end of the war, Kosciuszko returned to Poland and was a leading figure in that nation's Constitutional movement. He became Commander in Chief of the Polish Army and valiantly led a defense against a Russian invasion, and in 1794 he led what was dubbed the Kosciuszko Uprising—a revolt of Polish-Lithuanian forces against the Russian occupiers. Captured during the revolt, he was ultimately pardoned by Russia's Paul I and lived the remainder of his life as an international celebrity and a vocal proponent for human rights. Thomas Jefferson, with whom Kosciuszko had an ongoing correspondence on the immorality of slaveholding, called him "as pure a son of liberty as I have ever known." A lifelong bachelor with a knack for getting involved in doomed relationships, Kosciuszko navigated the tricky worlds of royal intrigue and romance while staying true to his ultimate passion—the pursuit of freedom for all. This definitive and exhaustively researched biography fills a long-standing gap in historical literature with its account of a dashing and inspiring revolutionary figure.

Achtzig Jahre und mehr

Author: Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Publisher: ein-FACH-verlag

ISBN: 3928089587

Category:

Page: 410

View: 3109

The Chautauqua Moment

Protestants, Progressives, and the Culture of Modern Liberalism, 1874-1920

Author: Andrew Chamberlin Rieser

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231501137

Category: Religion

Page: 416

View: 1319

This book traces the rise and decline of what Theodore Roosevelt once called the "most American thing in America." The Chautauqua movement began in 1874 on the shores of Chautauqua Lake in western New York. More than a college or a summer resort or a religious assembly, it was a composite of all of these—completely derivative yet brilliantly innovative. For five decades, Chautauqua dominated adult education and reached millions with its summer assemblies, reading clubs, and traveling circuits. Scholars have long struggled to make sense of Chautauqua's pervasive yet disorganized presence in American life. In this critical study, Andrew Rieser weaves the threads of Chautauqua into a single story and places it at the vital center of fin de siècle cultural and political history. Famous for its commitment to democracy, women's rights, and social justice, Chautauqua was nonetheless blind to issues of class and race. How could something that trumpeted democracy be so undemocratic in practice? The answer, Rieser argues, lies in the historical experience of the white, Protestant middle classes, who struggled to reconcile their parochial interests with radically new ideas about social progress and the state. The Chautauqua Moment brings color to a colorless demographic and spins a fascinating tale of modern liberalism's ambivalent but enduring cultural legacy.

Old Abe the War Eagle

A True Story of the Civil War And Reconstruction

Author: Richard Zeitlin

Publisher: Wisconsin Historical Society

ISBN: 0870206273

Category: History

Page: 120

View: 8857

The story of Old Abe, the bald eagle that became the mascot of the Eighth Regiment of Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. It is also the story of the men among whom Old Abe lived: the farmers, loggers, clerks, and immigrants who flocked to the colors in 1861.