A Room of One's Own

And Three Guineas

Author: Virginia Woolf

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199642214

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 294

View: 5870

'Intellectual freedom depends on material things. Poetry depends on intellectual freedom. And women have always been poor...'In these two classic essays of feminist literature, Woolf argues passionately for women's intellectual freedom and their role in challenging the drive towards fascism and conflict. In A Room of One's Own she explores centuries of limitations placed on women, as well as celebrating the creativeachievements of the women writers who overcame these obstacles.In this first history of women's writing, she describes the importance of education, financial independence, and equality of opportunity to creative freedom. ThreeGuineas was written under the threat of fascism and impending war. A radical articulation of Woolf's pacifist politics, it investigates the causes of gender inequalities and the ways in which women's historic outsider position make them crucial in the prevention of war. Both these works started life as talks to groups of young women, and their engaging wit and informality establish Woolf as one of the twentieth-century's greatest essayists. Their argumentscontinue to reverberate in feminist discourse to this day.

A Room of One's Own and Three Guineas

Author: Virginia Woolf

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1448139090

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 2796

WITH AN INTRODUCTION, PLUS EXTENSIVE NOTES AND REFERENCES BY HERMIONE LEE This volume combines two books which were among the greatest contributions to feminist literature this century. Together they form a brilliant attack on sexual inequality. A Room of One's Own, first published in 1929, is a witty, urbane and persuasive argument against the intellectual subjection of women, particularly women writers. The sequel, Three Guineas, is a passionate polemic which draws a startling comparison between the tyrannous hypocrisy of the Victorian patriarchal system and the evils of fascism.

Renaissance Women Poets

Author: Aemilia Lanyer,Isabella Whitney,Mary Sidney

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141958936

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 464

View: 3833

Whitney's two volumes of verse miscellany, 'Sweet Nosegay' (1573) and 'The Copy of a Letter' (1567), were part of a literary trend of combining classical and Biblical references with popular and vernacular sources, and reflect the growing literary appetites of the urban population. As well a selection of her original poetry, this volume includes Sidney's version of the Psalms of David and Petrach's 'Triumph of Death'. Lanyer's poetry is devotional and is the most single-minded and explicit inits advocacy of female spirituality and virtue. Included here are 'Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum' and 'The Description of Cooke-ham'.

Encyclopedia of Feminist Literature

Author: Kathy J. Whitson

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313327315

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 300

View: 1538

Presents the lives and works of approximately seventy feminist writers, including Emily Brontèe, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Virginia Woolf.

A Room of One's Own

Author: Tim Smith-Laing

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 1351350064

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 5652

A Room of One's Own is a very clear example of how creative thinkers connect and present things in novel ways. Based on the text of a talk given by Virginia Woolf at an all-female Cambridge college, Room considers the subject of 'women and fiction.' Woolf's approach is to ask why, in the early 20th century, literary history presented so few examples of canonically 'great' women writers. The common prejudices of the time suggested this was caused by (and proof of) women's creative and intellectual inferiority to men. Woolf argued instead that it was to do with a very simple fact: across the centuries, male-dominated society had systematically prevented women from having the educational opportunities, private spaces and economic independence to produce great art. At a time when 'art' was commonly considered to be a province of the mind that had no relation to economic circumstances, this was a novel proposal. More novel, though, was Woolf's manner of arguing and proving her contentions: through a fictional account of the limits placed on even the most privileged women in everyday existence. An impressive early example of cultural materialism, A Room of One's Own is an exemplary encapsulation of creative thinking.

Room of One's Own

Author: Virginia Woolf

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781847497888

Category:

Page: 256

View: 5334

Based on two lectures given at Cambridge colleges and first published by the Hogarth Press in 1929, A Room of One's Own is an extended essay about the predicament of female writers and a stirring call for autonomy and recognition. As well as settling scores with reactionary critics and laying the foundations of a history of women's literature, the text is also a triumph of imagination, with a celebrated passage envisaging the fate of a fictional sister of Shakespeare's.A seminal, widely studied feminist polemic that touches on both literature and politics, A Room of One's Own is essential reading for those wishing to understand the progress that has been made in women's rights and the struggles that still lie ahead. This edition also includes the 1938 essay Three Guineas, which reprises similar ideas in the context of the looming threat of war.

Walter Scott and the Limits of Language

Author: Alison Lumsden

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748687297

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 307

Scott's startlingly contemporary approach to theories of language and the creative impact of this on his work are explored in this new study.

The Years

Author: Virginia Woolf

Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc

ISBN: 1291550186

Category: Fiction

Page: N.A

View: 6089

Published in 1937 by Hogarth Press, The Years was the last novel released during Woolf’s lifetime. It was also the longest in development, having gone through a steady flow of refinements since it was first conceived as a novel-essay in 1931. Much like the previous novel, The Waves, this is as much or more about structure than it is about plot, following the progress or otherwise of the Pargiter family from 1880 up to ‘the present’. Again like The Waves, the stages of narrative presented as brief snapshots are interspersed with poetic vistas of British weather. That the dates coincide with Woolf’s life are not coincidence, writing to Hugh Walpole in 1932 she declared that, “ ... only autobiography is literature – novels are what we peel off ...” This can be taken in two ways: that a writer is obliged to get through the novels before coming to the more worthy autobiography; or that what’s presented as a novel is no more than the thin outer skin covering up the autobiography underneath.

A Room of One's Own

And, Three Guineas

Author: Virginia Woolf

Publisher: Penguin Classics

ISBN: 9780140185607

Category: English literature

Page: 364

View: 6525

In a lengthy essay, the narrator explores how the different educational experiences privilege men over women. Spending a day in the British Museum Library perusing the scholarship on women, she concludes that most of it -if not all- had been written by men in anger and hostility. The study of history was of no help. So she constructs in her own imagination what she imagines was the plight of women; to this effort she explains the impediments Judith Shakespeare -Shakespeare's sister- would have encountered. She then analyzes the achievements of the major women novelists of the nineteenth century, reflecting on the importance of tradition to an aspiring writer. Following up with living writers, she takes a close look at a novel by one of the narrator's contemporaries. Using a curious metaphor: "a spot the size of a shilling at the back of the head," she urges women to be original, and to write about what others don't see and miss; and that the writing must be smooth and clear: "Not a wheel must grate, not a light glimmer." In one word: writing that is incandescent. The problem as Woof sees it is that to accomplish that fine writing a woman must first achieve intellectual freedom as granted by having a room of one's own and five hundred a year in income. This edition has been re-paraphrased to lighten the density of the heavy paragraphs one finds in the original version. In addition, the work has been subdivided into chapters with appropriate headings. In other words, this is a version for the contemporary reader in the early 21st Century.

Thoughts on Peace in an Air Raid

Author: Virginia Woolf

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141957050

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 128

View: 6289

'The Germans were over this house last night and the night before that. Here they are again. It is a queer experience, lying in the dark and listening to the zoom of a hornet, which may at any moment sting you to death. It is a sound that interrupts cool and consecutive thinking about peace. Yet it is a sound - far more than prayers and anthems - that should compel one to think about peace. Unless we can think peace into existence we - not this one body in this one bed but millions of bodies yet to be born - will lie in the same darkness and hear the same death rattle overhead.' Throughout history, some books have changed the world. They have transformed the way we see ourselves - and each other. They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution. They have enlightened, outraged, provoked and comforted. They have enriched lives - and destroyed them. Now Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose ideas shook civilization and helped make us who we are.

Early Modern Women's Writing : An Anthology 1560-1700

An Anthology 1560-1700

Author: Paul Salzman

Publisher: Oxford University Press, UK

ISBN: 9780191563669

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 496

View: 7864

In a famous passage in A Room of One's Own, Virginia Woolf asked 'why women did not write poetry in the Elizabethan age'. She went on to speculate about an imaginary Judith Shakespeare who might have been destined for a career as illustrious as that of her brother William, except that she had none of his chances. The truth is that many women wrote during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and this collection will serve to introduce modern readers to the full variety of women's writing in this period - from poems, prose and fiction to prophecies, letters, tracts and philosophy. Here are examples of the work of twelve women writers, from aristocrats such as Mary Wroth, Anne Clifford and Margaret Cavendish to women of obscure background caught up in the religious ferment of the mid seventeenth century like Hester Biddle, Pricscilla Cotton and Mary Cole. The collection includes three plays, and a generous selection of poetry, letters, diary, prose fiction, religious polemic, prophecy and science. - ;In a famous passage in A Room of One's Own, Virginia Woolf asked 'why women did not write poetry in the Elizabethan age'. She went on to speculate about an imaginary Judith Shakespeare who might have been destined for a career as illustrious as that of her brother William, except that she had none of his chances. The truth is that many women wrote during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and this collection will serve to introduce modern readers to the full variety of women's writing in this period from poems, prose and fiction to prophecies, letters, tracts and philosophy. The collection begins with the poetry of Isabella Whitney, who worked in a gentlewoman's household in London in the late 1560s, and ends with Aphra Behn who was employed as a spy in Amsterdam by Charles II. Here are examples of the work of twelve women writers, allowing the reader to sample the diverse and lively output of all classes and opinions, from artistcrats such as Mary Wroth, Anne Clifford and Margaret Cavendish to women of obscure background caught up in the religious ferment of the mid seventeenth century like Hester Biddle, Pricscilla Cotton and Mary Cole. The collection includes three plays, and a generous selection of poetry, letters, diary, prose fiction, religious polemic, prohecy and scienticficic speculation, offering the reader the possibilility of tracing patterns through the works collected and some sense of historical shifts and changes. All the extracts are edited afresh from original sources and the anthology includes comprehensive notes, both explanatory and textual. -

Shakespeare's Sister

Author: Virginia Woolf

Publisher: Perfection Learning

ISBN: 9780789153333

Category:

Page: 36

View: 6925

Virginia Woolf. The third chapter of Woolf's essay "A Room of One's Own," based on two lectures the author gave to female students at Cambridge in 1928 on the topic of women and fiction. 36 pages. Tale Blazers.

Encounters in World History: From 1500

Author: Stephen Morillo,Samuel H. Nelson,Nancy Ellenberger

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities Social

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 520

View: 3811

History is an encounter with the past, and the past is a history of encounters. Encounters in World History is designed to introduce students to both of these sorts of encounters. Using primary and visual sources, the authors employ the encounter theme as a fundamental organizing principle. By nesting sources in thematically integrated chapters, comparison and analysis of sources can be more substantive, while also providing more internal structure for instructors. At the same time, this is a world history reader, and it follows a chronological format. The material has been presented in such a way that instructors can craft their own courses, emphasizing the aspects they think most important. Chapters are organized so that the general theme is presented in a chapter introduction and then revisited in the separate introductions to specific readings. The readers can be used to highlight preferred eras, cultural zones, or themes, or a unique mixture of all three.

Regarding the Pain of Others

Author: Susan Sontag

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 1466853573

Category: Social Science

Page: 144

View: 1298

A brilliant, clear-eyed new consideration of the visual representation of violence in our culture--its ubiquity, meanings, and effects Watching the evening news offers constant evidence of atrocity--a daily commonplace in our "society of spectacle." But are viewers inured -or incited--to violence by the daily depiction of cruelty and horror? Is the viewer's perception of reality eroded by the universal availability of imagery intended to shock? In her first full-scale investigation of the role of imagery in our culture since her now-classic book On Photography defined the terms of the debate twenty-five years ago, Susan Sontag cuts through circular arguments about how pictures can inspire dissent or foster violence as she takes a fresh look at the representation of atrocity--from Goya's The Disasters of War to photographs of the American Civil War, lynchings of blacks in the South, and Dachau and Auschwitz to contemporary horrific images of Bosnia, Sierra Leone, Rwanda, and New York City on September 11, 2001. As John Berger wrote when On Photography was first published, "All future discussions or analysis of the role of photography in the affluent mass-media societies is now bound to begin with her book." Sontag's new book, a startling reappraisal of the intersection of "information", "news," "art," and politics in the contemporary depiction of war and disaster, will be equally essential. It will forever alter our thinking about the uses and meanings of images in our world.

Good Morning, Midnight

Author: Jean Rhys

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393303940

Category: Fiction

Page: 189

View: 9043

"No one who reads Good Morning, Midnight will ever forget it." - New York Times

The Interpretation of Cultures

Author: Clifford Geertz

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465093566

Category: Social Science

Page: 576

View: 867

In The Interpretation of Cultures, the most original anthropologist of his generation moved far beyond the traditional confines of his discipline to develop an important new concept of culture. This groundbreaking book, winner of the 1974 Sorokin Award of the American Sociological Association, helped define for an entire generation of anthropologists what their field is ultimately about.

A room of one's own

women writers and the politics of creativity

Author: Ellen Bayuk Rosenman

Publisher: Twayne Pub

ISBN: 9780805785944

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 133

View: 3580

Written in an easy-to-read, accessible style by teachers with years of classroom experience, Masterwork Studies are guides to the literary works most frequently studied in high school. Presenting ideas that spark imaginations, these books help students to gain background knowledge on great literature useful for papers and exams. The goal of each study is to encourage creative thinking by presenting engaging information about each work and its author. This approach allows students to arrive at sound analyses of their own, based on in-depth studies of popular literature.Each volume: -- Illuminates themes and concepts of a classic text-- Uses clear, conversational language-- Is an accessible, manageable length from 140 to 170 pages-- Includes a chronology of the author's life and era-- Provides an overview of the historical context-- Offers a summary of its critical reception-- Lists primary and secondary sources and index