A Time to Risk All

The incredible untold story of Mary Elmes, the Irish woman who saved hundreds of children from Nazi Concentration Camps

Author: Clodagh Finn

Publisher: Gill & Macmillan Ltd

ISBN: 071717560X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 313

Clodagh Finn has travelled throughout Europe to piece together the story of this remarkable, unknown Irish woman, meeting many of those children Mary Elmes saved. Here, in a book packed with courage, heroism, adventure and tragedy, her story is finally remembered. The children called her ‘Miss Mary’, and they remember her kindness still. She gave them food and shelter and later risked her life to help them escape the convoys bound for Auschwitz. Turning her back on a brilliant academic career, Mary Elmes ventured into a war zone to help children in the Spanish Civil War. In 1939, she fled Franco’s forces but continued to work with refugees in France when the Second World War broke out. In 1942, when it became evident that Jews were being deported to their deaths, she smuggled children to safety in the boot of her car. She was arrested and imprisoned by the Gestapo, but went straight back to work after her release. When the war was over, Mary married and settled down, never speaking about what she had done. Her story was forgotten. In A Time to Risk All her remarkable story is finally remembered as it should be. 'A compelling portrait of an unsung Irish heroine of two wars' Madeleine Keane, Literary Editor, Sunday Independent ‘Brings to light the life of Mary Elmes, showing a remarkable, independent and courageous woman whose compassion knew no borders.’ Yvonne Altman O’Connor, Culture and Education Director, Irish Jewish Museum

A Time to Risk All

The Incredible Untold Story of Mary Elmes, the Irish Woman who Saved Children from Nazi Concentration Camps

Author: Clodagh Finn

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780717175611

Category: Jewish children in the Holocaust

Page: 288

View: 6882

'I am truly grateful to Mary Elmes for the life I might not have had, had it not been for her brave actions to save us and many others. She was truly a heroine.' Michael Freund Mary Elmes was an extraordinary woman. Sometimes known as the 'Irish Schindler', she was born in Cork in 1908 and educated at Trinity College Dublin. She won a scholarship to study at the London School of Economics and travelled to Europe in the 1930s. There, she volunteered to help refugees during the Spanish Civil War. Nothing could have prepared her for the horrific suffering she would witness, but she was determined to aid as many people as she could. When Barcelona fell to Franco's forces, she followed the Spanish refugees to southern France and continued to help them in the camps where they were interned. Soon, she found herself in the middle of another conflict, the Second World War, and was helping refugees of all nationalities. By 1942, it became evident that Jews, who were also held in the camps by the collaborationist Vichy authorities, were in danger of being deported to their death. Mary Elmes risked her life to help children and adults escape. She smuggled children out in the boot of her car and succeeded in getting a number of adults off the convoys going to the Nazi death camps. She was arrested and imprisoned by the Gestapo on suspicion of espionage and carrying out a series of hostile acts against Germany. When the war was over, she married a Frenchman and settled down in Perpignan, never speaking about what she had done in either conflict. When the French government offered her its highest honour, the Legion d'Honneur, she turned it down, preferring instead to try put the war behind her. In 2013, she became the first Irish person to be named 'Righteous Among the Nations' at Yad Vashem, Israel's official memorial to Jewish victims of the Holocaust. Now, finally, her story has come to light and a forgotten heroine will be remembered as she deserves. 'A compelling biography of an unsung hero' The Irish Independent 'A truly amazing and uplifting story, I'd recommend it to anybody.' Marian Finucane 'This is the Irish Schindler story - remarkable' Ivan Yates

The Extraordinary Story of Mary Elmes

The Irish Oskar Schindler

Author: Paddy Butler

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781786050441

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 176

View: 8161

The gripping story of one woman's heroism during the twentieth century's bloodiest conflicts. Includes photographs and a wealth of archival material about the woman credited with saving over 200 children from death camps.

Folk Devils and Moral Panics

Author: Stanley Cohen

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1136807047

Category: Social Science

Page: 328

View: 1617

'Richly documented and convincingly presented' -- New Society Mods and Rockers, skinheads, video nasties, designer drugs, bogus asylum seeks and hoodies. Every era has its own moral panics. It was Stanley Cohen’s classic account, first published in the early 1970s and regularly revised, that brought the term ‘moral panic’ into widespread discussion. It is an outstanding investigation of the way in which the media and often those in a position of political power define a condition, or group, as a threat to societal values and interests. Fanned by screaming media headlines, Cohen brilliantly demonstrates how this leads to such groups being marginalised and vilified in the popular imagination, inhibiting rational debate about solutions to the social problems such groups represent. Furthermore, he argues that moral panics go even further by identifying the very fault lines of power in society. Full of sharp insight and analysis, Folk Devils and Moral Panics is essential reading for anyone wanting to understand this powerful and enduring phenomenon. Professor Stanley Cohen is Emeritus Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics. He received the Sellin-Glueck Award of the American Society of Criminology (1985) and is on the Board of the International Council on Human Rights. He is a member of the British Academy.

British Women and the Spanish Civil War

Author: Angela Jackson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134471076

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 5655

Through oral and written narratives, this book examines the interaction between women and the war in Spain, their motivation, the distinctive form of their involvment and the effect of the war on their individual lives. These themes are related to wider issues, such as the nature of memory and the role of women within the public sphere. The extent to which women engaged with this cause surpasses by far other instances of female mobilization in peace-time Britain. Such a phenomenon therefore can offer lessons to those who would wish to encourage a greater degree of interest amongst women in political activities today.

Irena's Children

The Extraordinary Story of the Woman Who Saved 2,500 Children from the Warsaw Ghetto

Author: Tilar J. Mazzeo

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1476778515

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 2383

The "extraordinary and gripping account of Irena Sendler--the "female Oskar Schindler"--who took staggering risks to save 2,500 children from death and deportation in Nazi-occupied Poland during World War II"--Dust jacket.

The Choice

Embrace the Possible

Author: Edith Eva Eger

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501130811

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 5394

Winner of the 2017 National Jewish Book Award and 2018 Christopher Award “Edith’s strength and courage are remarkable…her life and work are an incredible example of forgiveness, resilience, and generosity.”—Sheryl Sandberg It’s 1944 and sixteen-year-old ballerina and gymnast Edith Eger is sent to Auschwitz. Separated from her parents on arrival, she endures unimaginable experiences, including being made to dance for the infamous Josef Mengele. When the camp is finally liberated, she is pulled from a pile of bodies, barely alive. The horrors of the Holocaust didn’t break Edith. In fact, they helped her learn to live again with a life-affirming strength and a truly remarkable resilience. The Choice is her unforgettable story.

5001 Nights at the Movies

Author: Pauline Kael

Publisher: Holt Paperbacks

ISBN: 1250033578

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 960

View: 4461

The intelligent person's guide to the movies, with more than 2,800 reviews Look up a movie in this guide, and chances are you'll find yourself reading on about the next movie and the next. Pauline Kael's reviews aren't just provocative---they're addictive. These brief, informative reviews, written for the "Goings On About Town" section of The New Yorker, provide an immense range of listings---a masterly critical history of American and foreign film. This is probably the only movie guide you'll want to read for the sheer pleasure of it.

Children of Nazis

The Sons and Daughters of Himmler, Göring, Höss, Mengele, and Others— Living with a Father’s Monstrous Legacy

Author: Tania Crasnianski

Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing Inc.

ISBN: 1628728086

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 9704

In 1940, the German sons and daughters of great Nazi dignitaries Himmler, Göring, Hess, Frank, Bormann, Speer, and Mengele were children of privilege at four, five, or ten years old, surrounded by affectionate, all-powerful parents. Although innocent and unaware of what was happening at the time, they eventually discovered the extent of their father’s occupations: These men—their fathers who were capable of loving their children and receiving love in return—were leaders of the Third Reich, and would later be convicted as monstrous war criminals. For these children, the German defeat was an earth-shattering source of family rupture, the end of opulence, and the jarring discovery of Hitler’s atrocities. How did the offspring of these leaders deal with the aftermath of the war and the skeletons that would haunt them forever? Some chose to disown their past. Others did not. Some condemned their fathers; others worshipped them unconditionally to the end. In this enlightening book, Tania Crasnianski examines the responsibility of eight descendants of Nazi notables, caught somewhere between stigmatization, worship, and amnesia. By tracing the unique experiences of these children, she probes at the relationship between them and their fathers and examines the idea of how responsibility for the fault is continually borne by the descendants.

History of Brighthelmston

Author: John Ackerson Erredge

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780952175711

Category: Brighton (England)

Page: 408

View: 4907

Beyond Holy Russia

The Life and Times of Stephen Graham

Author: Michael Hughes

Publisher: Open Book Publishers

ISBN: 1783740124

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 369

View: 3232

This biography examines the long life of the traveller and author Stephen Graham. Graham walked across large parts of the Tsarist Empire in the years before 1917, describing his adventures in a series of books and articles that helped to shape attitudes towards Russia in Britain and the United States. In later years he travelled widely across Europe and North America, meeting some of the best known writers of the twentieth century, including H.G.Wells and Ernest Hemingway. Graham also wrote numerous novels and biographies that won him a wide readership on both sides of the Atlantic. This book traces Graham’s career as a world traveller, and provides a rich portrait of English, Russian and American literary life in the first half of the twentieth century. It also examines how many aspects of his life and writing coincide with contemporary concerns, including the development of New Age spirituality and the rise of environmental awareness. Beyond Holy Russia is based on extensive research in archives of private papers in Britain and the USA and on the many works of Graham himself. The author describes with admirable tact and clarity Graham’s heterodox and convoluted spiritual quest. The result is a fascinating portrait of a man who was for many years a significant literary figure on both sides of the Atlantic.

Survivors Club

The True Story of a Very Young Prisoner of Auschwitz

Author: Michael Bornstein,Debbie Bornstein Holinstat

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (Byr)

ISBN: 0374305714

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 352

View: 4621

"The incredible true story of Michael Bornstein--who at age 4 was one of the youngest children to be liberated from Auschwitz--and of his family"--

A CHILD OF THE JAGO (Modern Classics Series)

A Tale from the Old London Slum

Author: Arthur Morrison

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN: 8026853601

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 622

This carefully crafted ebook: äóìA CHILD OF THE JAGO (Modern Classics Series)äó� is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. A Child of the Jago recounts the brief life of Dicky Perrott, a child growing up in the "Old Jago", a fictionalization of the Old Nichol, a slum located between Shoreditch High Street and Bethnal Green Road in the East End of London. The Jago is a London slum where crime and violence are the only way of life, and from which there is no escape for the inhabitants. At the start of the novel Dicky Perrott is about 8 years old, undernourished and roaming the streets, forced to do whatever it takes in order to survive. Dickyäó»s affectionate nature and willingness to work provides a glimmer of hope that he can escape from the corruption of the Jago, but this hope is cynically thwarted by the avaricious Weech. The criminalizing of innocence in an environment of poverty and crime echoes the predicament of Oliver Twist. Arthur Morrison (1863-1945) was an English writer and journalist known for his realistic novels and stories about working-class life in London's East End, A Child of the Jago being the best known. Morrison is also known for his detective stories, featuring the detective Martin Hewitt, low-key, realistic, lower class answer to Sherlock Holmes. Martin Hewitt stories are similar in style to those of Conan Doyle, cleverly plotted and very amusing, while the character himself is a bit less arrogant and a bit more charming than Holmes.

Safe Management of Wastes from Health-Care Activities

Author: World Health Organization

Publisher: World Health Organization

ISBN: 9241548568

Category: Medical

Page: 308

View: 1893

This is the second edition of the World Health Organization (WHO) handbook on the safe, sustainable and affordable management of health-care waste - commonly known as "the Blue Book". The original Blue Book was a comprehensive publication used widely in health-care centres and government agencies to assist in the adoption of national guidance. It also provided support to committed medical directors and managers to make improvements and presented practical information on waste-management techniques for medical staff and waste workers. In many countries, knowledge about the potential for harm from health-care wastes has now become more prominent to governments, medical practitioners and civil society. Increasingly, managers and medical staff are expected to take more responsibility for the wastes they produce from their medical care and related activities. The indiscriminate and erratic handling and disposal of waste within health-care facilities is now widely recognized as a source of avoidable infection, and is synonymous with public perception of poor standards of health care.

Memorials of Old London

Author: Peter Hampson Ditchfield

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: London (England)

Page: N.A

View: 4079

Beyond the Witch Trials

Witchcraft and Magic in Enlightenment Europe

Author: Owen Davies,Willem De Blécourt

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719066603

Category: History

Page: 211

View: 4647

Beyond the witch trials provides an important collection of essays on the nature of witchcraft and magic in European society during the Enlightenment. The book is innovative not only because it pushes forward the study of witchcraft into the eighteenth century, but because it provides the reader with a challenging variety of different approaches and sources of information. The essays, which cover England, Netherlands, Spain, Italy, Germany, Scotland, Finland and Sweden, examine the experience of and attitudes towards witchcraft from both above and below. While they demonstrate the continued widespread fear of witches amongst the masses, they also provide a corrective to the notion that intellectual society lost interest in the question of witchcraft. While witchcraft prosecutions were comparatively rare by the mid-eighteenth century, the intellectual debate did no disappear; it either became more private or refocused on such issues as possession. The contributors come from different academic disciplines, and by borrowing from literary theory, archaeology and folklore they move beyond the usual historical perspectives and sources. They emphasise the importance of studying such themes as the aftermath of witch trials, the continued role of cunning-folk in society, and the nature of the witchcraft discourse in different social contexts. This book will be essential reading for those interested in the decline of the European witch trials and the continued importance of witchcraft and magic during the Enlightenment. More generally it will appeal to those with a lively interest in the cultural history of the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. This is the first of a two-volume set of books looking at the phenomenon of witchcraft, magic and the occult in Europe since the seventeenth century.

'By the Banks of the Neva'

Chapters from the Lives and Careers of the British in Eighteenth-Century Russia

Author: Anthony Glenn Cross

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521552936

Category: History

Page: 474

View: 2950

An investigation into the lives and careers of the British in eighteenth-century Russia, first published in 1996.

Helga's Diary: A Young Girl's Account of Life in a Concentration Camp

A Young Girl’s Account of Life in a Concentration Camp

Author: Helga Weiss

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393089746

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 240

View: 2513

“A sacred reminder of what so many millions suffered, and only a few survived.”—Adam Kirsch, New Republic In 1939, Helga Weiss was a young Jewish schoolgirl in Prague. Along with some 45,000 Jews living in the city, Helga’s family endured the first wave of the Nazi invasion: her father was denied work; she was forbidden from attending regular school. As Helga witnessed the increasing Nazi brutality, she began documenting her experiences in a diary. In 1941, Helga and her parents were sent to the concentration camp of Terezín. There, Helga continued to write with astonishing insight about her daily life: the squalid living quarters, the cruel rationing of food, and the executions—as well as the moments of joy and hope that persisted in even the worst conditions. In 1944, Helga and her family were sent to Auschwitz. Before she left, Helga’s uncle, who worked in the Terezín records department, hid her diary and drawings in a brick wall. Miraculously, he was able to reclaim them for her after the war. Of the 15,000 children brought to Terezín and later deported to Auschwitz, only 100 survived. Helga was one of them. Reconstructed from her original notebooks, the diary is presented here in its entirety. With an introduction by Francine Prose, a revealing interview between translator Neil Bermel and Helga, and the artwork Helga made during her time at Terezín, Helga's Diary stands as a vivid and utterly unique historical document.

The Children's Train

Author: Jana Zinser

Publisher: BQB Publishing

ISBN: 1939371864

Category: Fiction

Page: 368

View: 5706

In November 1938 on The Night of the Broken Glass, the Jewish people of Germany are terrified as Hitler's men shatter their store windows, steal and destroy their belongings, and arrest many Jewish fathers and brothers. Parents fear for their own lives but their focus is on protecting their children. When England arranges to take the children out of Germany by train, the Kindertransport is organized and parents scramble to get places on the trains for their young family members, worried about what the future will hold. Soon, trains filled with Jewish children escaping the Nazis chug over the border into Holland, where they are ferried across the English Channel to England and to freedom. But for Peter, the shy violin player, his sister Becca, and his friends Stephen and Hans, life in England holds challenges as well. Peter’s friend Eva, who did not get a seat on the Kindertransport, is left to the evil plans of Hitler. Peter, working his musician’s hands raw at a farm in Coventry, wonders if they should have stayed and fought back instead of escaping. When the Coventry farm is bombed and Nazis have reached England, Peter feels he has nothing left. He decides it’s time to stand and fight Hitler. Peter returns to Germany to join the Jewish underground resistance, search for the mother and sister he left behind in Berlin, and rescue his childhood friend Eva.