Abraham Lincoln and the Illinois Central Railroad

main line of mid-America; its organization, financing, and subsequent simplification of debt and capital structure through May 1955

Author: Edwin Sherwood Stowell Sunderland

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 117

View: 6385

Abraham Lincoln and the Illinois Central Railroad, Main Line of Mid-America

Its Organization, Financing, and Subsequent Simplification of Debt and Capital Structure Through May 1955 (Classic Reprint)

Author: Edwin Sherwood Stowell Sunderland

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 9781391983172

Category: Reference

Page: 140

View: 5305

Excerpt from Abraham Lincoln and the Illinois Central Railroad, Main Line of Mid-America: Its Organization, Financing, and Subsequent Simplification of Debt and Capital Structure Through May 1955 Appendix C. Credit Given to Carlton I. Corliss, Author Main Line of M id-america, Published by the Creative Age Press at the Time of the Railroad's Centennial. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Lincoln's Greatest Case: The River, the Bridge, and the Making of America

Author: Brian McGinty

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 087140785X

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 8262

The untold story of how one sensational trial propelled a self-taught lawyer and a future president into the national spotlight. In May of 1856, the steamboat Effie Afton barreled into a pillar of the Rock Island Bridge, unalterably changing the course of American transportation history. Within a year, long-simmering tensions between powerful steamboat interests and burgeoning railroads exploded, and the nation’s attention, absorbed by the Dred Scott case, was riveted by a new civil trial. Dramatically reenacting the Effie Afton case—from its unlikely inception, complete with a young Abraham Lincoln’s soaring oratory, to the controversial finale—this “masterful” (Christian Science Monitor) account gives us the previously untold story of how one sensational trial propelled a self-taught lawyer and a future president into the national spotlight.

Abraham Lincoln as Attorney for the Illinois Central Railroad Company

Author: Illinois Central Railroad Company

Publisher: Andesite Press

ISBN: 9781296759629

Category:

Page: 46

View: 737

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Nothing Like It In the World

The Men Who Built the Transcontinental Railroad 1863-1869

Author: Stephen E. Ambrose

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780743203173

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 431

View: 2432

Chronicles the race to finish the transcontinental railroad in the 1860s and the exploits, sacrifices, triumphs, and tragedies of the individuals who made it happen.

Chicago and the Illinois Central Railroad

Author: Clifford J. Downey

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738550749

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 3104

Headquartered in Chicago, the Illinois Central Railroad was known as the "Main Line of Mid-America," as it was a major railroad cutting through the middle section of the United States with two major routes: the Main Line, which ran south out of Chicago toward New Orleans, and the Western Lines, which ran west toward Iowa. The Illinois Central Railroad had eight major freight yards in Chicago, which in 1937 handled nearly two million freight cars. It was also well known for its passenger service and operated some of the finest passenger trains: the Green Diamond, the all-Pullman Panama Limited, and the City of New Orleans. Chicago and the Illinois Central Railroad covers the railroad's operations within the city of Chicago, plus the outlying suburbs, from the late 1800s to 1960. It explores, through vintage photographs, the passenger and freight trains, suburban trains, locomotives, shops and repair facilities, and people that made the railroad function.

Abraham Lincoln

As Attorney for the Illinois Central Railroad Company (Classic Reprint)

Author: Illinois Central Railroad Company

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 9780365350842

Category: Reference

Page: 46

View: 3689

Excerpt from Abraham Lincoln: As Attorney for the Illinois Central Railroad Company He was attorney for the Illinois Central Railroad Company in the early 505. The negative from which this photograph was taken is from an original print, in the possession. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Lincoln and McClellan at War

A Novel

Author: Chester G. Hearn

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 0807145548

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 5286

At the beginning of the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln and his highest-ranking general, George B. McClellan, agreed that the United States must preserve the Union. Their differing strategies for accomplishing that goal, however, created constant conflict. In Lincoln and McClellan at War, Chester G. Hearn explores this troubled relationship, revealing its complexity and showing clearly why the two men -- both inexperienced with war -- eventually parted ways. A staunch Democrat who never lost his acrimony toward Republicans -- including the president -- McClellan first observed Lincoln as an attorney representing the Illinois Central Railroad and immediately disliked him. This underlying bias followed thirty-five-year-old McClellan into his role as general-in-chief of the Union army. Lincoln, a man without military training, promoted McClellan on the advice of cabinet members and counted on "Little Mac" to whip the army into shape and end the war quickly. McClellan comported himself with great confidence and won Lincoln's faith by brilliantly organizing the Army of the Potomac. Later, however, he lost Lincoln's trust by refusing to send what he called "the best army on the planet" into battle. The more frustrated Lincoln grew with McClellan's inaction, the more Lincoln studied authoritative works on military strategy and offered strategic combat advice to the general. McClellan resented the president's suggestions and habitually deflected them. Ultimately, Lincoln removed McClellan for what the president termed "the slows." According to Hearn, McClellan's intransigence stemmed largely from his reluctance to fight offensively. Thoroughly schooled in European defensive tactics, McClellan preferred that approach to fighting the war. His commander-in-chief, on the other hand, had a preference for using offensive tactics. This compelling study of two important and diverse figures reveals how personality and politics prolonged the Civil War.

The Real Lincoln

A Portrait

Author: Jesse William Weik

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803298224

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 453

View: 3660

Originally published in 1922, The Real Lincoln is an in-depth look at Abraham Lincoln the man, not the public figure. Acclaimed at the time as an excellent, impartial source book, The Real Lincoln was compiled by Jesse W. Weik through a series of letters and interviews with people who knew the sixteenth president personally as well as their descendents. This is an examination of Lincoln without the weight of history, looking at him as a dynamic figure and illuminating aspects of his life before his presidency. His childhood, his marriage to Mary Todd, his law practice, the way he spent his free time, and his introduction to politics are just some of the subjects covered. In this latest edition of The Real Lincoln, Michael Burlingame has included dozens of original letters and interviews received by Weik between 1892 and 1922 that went into creating this work. Occasionally lighthearted and always insightful, this revealing book will enthrall anyone curious about the human side of the man too often viewed as a monument.

An Honest Calling

The Law Practice of Abraham Lincoln

Author: Mark E. Steiner

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780875806266

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 2164

Abraham Lincoln practiced law for nearly 25 years, five times longer than he served as president. Nonetheless, this aspect of his life was known only in the broadest outlines until the Lincoln Legal Papers project set to work gathering the surviving documentation of more than 5,600 of his cases. One of the first scholars to work in this vast collection, Mark E. Steiner goes beyond the hasty sketches of previous biographers to paint a detailed portrait of Lincoln the lawyer. This portrait not only depicts Lincoln's work for the railroads and the infamous case in which he defended the claims of a slaveholder; it also illustrates his more typical cases involving debt and neighborly disputes. Steiner describes Lincoln's legal education, the economics of the law office, and the changes in legal practice that Lincoln himself experienced as the nation became an industrial, capitalist society. Most important, Steiner highlights Lincoln's guiding principles as a lawyer. In contrast to the popular caricature of the lawyer as a scoundrel, Lincoln followed his personal resolve to be “honest at all events,” thus earning the nickname “Honest Abe.” For him, honesty meant representing clients to the best of his ability, regardless of his own beliefs about the justice of their cause. Lincoln also embraced a professional ideal that cast the lawyer as a guardian of order. He was as willing to mediate a dispute outside the courtroom in the interest of maintaining peace as he was eager to win cases before a jury. Over the course of his legal career, however, Lincoln's dedication to the community and his clients' personal interests became outmoded. As a result of the rise of powerful, faceless corporate clients and the national debate over slavery, Lincoln the lawyer found himself in an increasingly impersonal, morally ambiguous world.

Lincoln and McClellan

The Troubled Partnership between a President and His General

Author: John C. Waugh

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 9780230106765

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 7863

There was no more remarkable pair in the Civil War than Abraham Lincoln and George McClellan. At only 35 years old, McClellan commanded the Ohio troops early in the war, and won skirmishes for the Union in western Virginia. After the disastrous Union defeat at Bull Run in the summer of 1861, Lincoln sent word for McClellan to come to Washington, and soon elevated him to commander-in-chief of the Union army. But in the late summer and fall of 1861, things took a turn for the worst. Meticulous in his planning and preparations, McClellan began to delay attacking the enemy and developed a penchant for vastly overestimating the Confederate forces he faced. All of this hampered his ability to lead an aggressive force in a fast-moving battlefield environment. Finally losing his patience, Lincoln was famously quoted as saying, "If General McClellan does not want to use the army, I would like to borrow it for a time." Lincoln and McClellan takes an in-depth look at this fascinating relationship, from the early days of the Civil War to the 1864 presidential election when McClellan ran against Lincoln on an anti-war platform and lost. Here, award-winning author John C. Waugh weaves a tale of hubris, paranoia, failure, and triumph, illuminating as never before this unique and complicated alliance.

Hell Gate of the Mississippi

The Effie Afton Trial and Abraham Lincoln's Role in it

Author: Larry A. Riney

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780979152801

Category: History

Page: 323

View: 9111

Step back into what was then the wild-and-woolly Far West of 1857 and the trial that helped make Abraham Lincoln a household name. Get a juryman's front-row view of the Illinois courtroom battle that defined the economic war fought between St. Louis steamboat men and women and their hated foes, the Chicago and New York railroad tycoons. Hell Gate of the Mississippi is the first book that covers this explosive chapter in our early history.

Railroader

The Unfiltered Genius and Controversy of Four-Time CEO Hunter Harrison

Author: Howard Green

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781989025048

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 7582

Hunter Harrison, the revolutionary railroader from Memphis, dramatically turned four publicly traded companies into cash machines. Starting as a laborer when he was a wayward teenager, Harrison spent a half century in the rail business and nearly two decades running Illinois Central, Canadian National, Canadian Pacific, and CSX. Never accepting the status quo, Harrison not only renovated established railroads, he forced an industry to shape up. As the pre-eminent proponent of Precision Scheduled Railroading, Harrison created approximately $50 billion in shareholder value. Charming, profane, and not afraid to make enemies, the no-bullshit CEO let nothing get in his way. At the same time, he was a talent scout and coach to thousands, and a devoted father and husband for more than fifty years. Railroader offers insights into running all businesses. Howard Green's unauthorized, highly personal biography is deeply researched, based on conversations with Harrison over several years. It also includes candid stories from Harrison's family and colleagues--those who admired him and those who criticized him. Green's access and decades of experience give him the unparalleled ability to tell the story of this uncompromising leader who both inspired and infuriated.

Lincoln and the Indians

Civil War Policy and Politics

Author: David Allen Nichols

Publisher: Minnesota Historical Society Press

ISBN: 0873518764

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 223

View: 2314

Lincoln and the Indians is the only thorough treatment of Lincoln's Indian policy during the Civil War and the corrupt "Indian System" of government aid that mainly benefitted ambitious whites.

The Northern Railroads In The Civil War, 1861-1865

Author: Thomas Weber

Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing

ISBN: 1786254395

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 9400

“Time has been very good to Thomas Weber’s Northern Railroads in the Civil War, 1861-1865. First published by Columbia University Press in 1952, it has been out of print since the 1970s, but never out of demand. It has emerged as the premier account of the impact of the railroads on the American Civil War and vice versa. Not only did the railroads materially help the north to victory through movement of troops and materiel, but the war materially changed the way railroads were built, run, financed, and organized in the crucial years following the war.”-Print ed. “...eminently worthy of study by those interested in either railroads or the Civil War.” - Robert Selph Henry, New York Times Book Review “Thomas Weber’s study of northern railroads during the Civil War remains the obvious treatment of an important topic. His analysis rests on solid research and leaves no doubt that the North’s excellent use of railroads contributed significantly to Union victory.”—Gary W. Gallagher “Thomas Weber’s... analysis rests on solid research and leaves no doubt that the North’s excellent use of railroads contributed significantly to Union victory.”—Gary W. Gallagher

Looking for Lincoln in Illinois

A Guide to Lincoln's Eighth Judicial Circuit

Author: Guy C. Fraker

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 0809336162

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 136

View: 5277

"This guidebook allows readers to drive (or just read about) the Eighth Judicial Circuit during Lincoln's era. It contains detailed directions, brief stories about Lincoln locations and events, and a significant collection of photographs, including images of all the court houses in which Lincoln practiced"--