America is In the Heart

A Personal History

Author: Carlos Bulosan

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 9780295952895

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 351

View: 1295

First published in 1946, this autobiography of the well-known Filipino poet describes his boyhood in the Philippines, his voyage to America, and his years of hardship and despair as an itinerant laborer following the harvest trail in the rural West.

America Is Not the Heart

A Novel

Author: Elaine Castillo

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0735222436

Category: Fiction

Page: 416

View: 6579

"A saga rich with origin myths, national and personal . . . Castillo is part of a younger generation of American writers instilling literature with a layered sense of identity." --Vogue How many lives fit in a lifetime? When Hero De Vera arrives in America--haunted by the political upheaval in the Philippines and disowned by her parents--she's already on her third. Her uncle gives her a fresh start in the Bay Area, and he doesn't ask about her past. His younger wife knows enough about the might and secrecy of the De Vera family to keep her head down. But their daughter--the first American-born daughter in the family--can't resist asking Hero about her damaged hands. An increasingly relevant story told with startling lucidity, humor, and an uncanny ear for the intimacies and shorthand of family ritual, America Is Not the Heart is a sprawling, soulful debut about three generations of women in one family struggling to balance the promise of the American dream and the unshakeable grip of history. With exuberance, grit, and sly tenderness, here is a family saga; an origin story; a romance; a narrative of two nations and the people who leave one home to grasp at another.

The Americas of Asian American Literature

Gendered Fictions of Nation and Transnation

Author: Rachel C. Lee

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400823208

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 6689

Drawing on a wide array of literary, historical, and theoretical sources, Rachel Lee addresses current debates on the relationship among Asian American ethnic identity, national belonging, globalization, and gender. Lee argues that scholars have traditionally placed undue emphasis on ethnic-based political commitments--whether these are construed as national or global--in their readings of Asian American texts. This has constrained the intelligibility of stories that are focused less on ethnicity than on kinship, family dynamics, eroticism, and gender roles. In response, Lee makes a case for a reconceptualized Asian American criticism that centrally features gender and sexuality. Through a critical analysis of select literary texts--novels by Carlos Bulosan, Gish Jen, Jessica Hagedorn, and Karen Yamashita--Lee probes the specific ways in which some Asian American authors have steered around ethnic themes with alternative tales circulating around gender and sexual identity. Lee makes it clear that what has been missing from current debates has been an analysis of the complex ways in which gender mediates questions of both national belonging and international migration. From anti-miscegenation legislation in the early twentieth century to poststructuralist theories of language to Third World feminist theory to critical studies of global cultural and economic flows, The Americas of Asian American Literature takes up pressing cultural and literary questions and points to a new direction in literary criticism.

All the Conspirators

Author: Carlos Bulosan

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 9780295984971

Category: Fiction

Page: 161

View: 503

At the end of WWII, American Gar Stanley, returns to his native Phillippines to help a good friend try to find her lost husband. His search will take him from one island to another and put him in contact with all levels of humanity. He finds he must move quickly to stay ahead of all the deadly conspirators before they can kill his friend.

The Cry and the Dedication

Author: Carlos Bulosan

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 9781566392969

Category: Fiction

Page: 305

View: 3290

This previously unpublished novel by the author of America Is in the Heart dramatizes the resourcefulness, cunning, and pain of the Filipino peasants' struggle against a heritage of colonization, first by Spain and later by the United States. Set during the political upheavals of the 1940s and 1950s, seven underground rebels-old and young, male and female, intellectual and peasant-set off across the Philippine countryside fueled by their outrage over continued U.S. domination. They combat both internal foes from their past memories and experiences and visible enemies who view their clandestine work as a destructive force of communism. As they confront danger and face physical and emotional sacrifices along the way, their sense of mission conveys a profound vision of democracy and self-determination.Bulosan's exceptional narrative, at once an allegorical and a psychological critique of the West's racism and delusion of supremacy, portrays an armed rebellion that can represent many Third World peoples. Literary and political, Bulosan's work embodies his personal dream of equality and freedom. When asked what impelled him to write, Bulosan replied, "To give literate voices to the voiceless...to translate the desires and aspirations of the whole Filipino people in the Philippines and abroad in terms relevant to contemporary history." Author note: Born in 1911 in the Philippines to a peasant family, Carlos Bulosan was one of the first wave of Filipino immigrants to come to the United States in the 1930s. After several arduous years as a farmworker in California, Bulosan became involved with radical intellectuals and started editing the workers' magazine The New Tide.While hospitalized for three years for tuberculosis and kidney problems, Bulosan began writing poetry and short stories. Despite having little formal education, he saw his talent for writing as a means to give a voice to Filipino struggles, both in the Philippines and in the United States. He went on to publish three volumes of poetry, a best-selling collection of stories, The Laughter of My Father, and America Is in the Heart, the much acclaimed chronicle based on his family's battle to overcome poverty, violence, and racism in the United States. The Cry and the Dedication carries on Bulosan's passionate, satirical style. >P>E. San Juan, Jr. is Fellow of the Center for the Humanities and Visiting Professor of English, Wesleyan University, and Director of the Philippines Cultural Studies Center. He was recently chair of the Department of Comparative American Cultures, Washington University, and Professor of Ethnic Studies at Bowling Green State University, Ohio. He received the 1999 Centennial Award for Literature from the Philippines Cultural Center. His most recent books are Beyond Postcolonial Theory, From Exile to Diaspora, After Postcolonialism, and Racism and Cultural Studies.

Filipinos in Stockton

Author: Dawn B. Mabalon, Ph.D.,Rico Reyes,Filipino American National Historical So

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738556246

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 1306

The first Filipino settlers arrived in Stockton, California, around 1898, and through most of the 20th century, this city was home to the largest community of Filipinos outside the Philippines. Because countless Filipinos worked in, passed through, and settled here, it became the crossroads of Filipino America. Yet immigrants were greeted with signs that read "Positively No Filipinos Allowed" and were segregated to a four-block area centered on Lafayette and El Dorado Streets, which they called "Little Manila." In the 1970s, redevelopment and the Crosstown Freeway decimated the Little Manila neighborhood. Despite these barriers, Filipino Americans have created a vibrant ethnic community and a rich cultural legacy. Filipino immigrants and their descendants have shaped the history, culture, and economy of the San Joaquin Delta area.

Filipino American Lives

Author: Yen Le Espiritu,Yen Espiritu

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 9781439905579

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 240

View: 6017

First person narratives by Filipino Americans reveal the range of their experiences-before and after immigration.

Little Manila Is in the Heart

The Making of the Filipina/o American Community in Stockton, California

Author: Dawn Bohulano Mabalon

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822395746

Category: Social Science

Page: 458

View: 9114

In the early twentieth century—not long after 1898, when the United States claimed the Philippines as an American colony—Filipinas/os became a vital part of the agricultural economy of California's fertile San Joaquin Delta. In downtown Stockton, they created Little Manila, a vibrant community of hotels, pool halls, dance halls, restaurants, grocery stores, churches, union halls, and barbershops. Little Manila was home to the largest community of Filipinas/os outside of the Philippines until the neighborhood was decimated by urban redevelopment in the 1960s. Narrating a history spanning much of the twentieth century, Dawn Bohulano Mabalon traces the growth of Stockton's Filipina/o American community, the birth and eventual destruction of Little Manila, and recent efforts to remember and preserve it. Mabalon draws on oral histories, newspapers, photographs, personal archives, and her own family's history in Stockton. She reveals how Filipina/o immigrants created a community and ethnic culture shaped by their identities as colonial subjects of the United States, their racialization in Stockton as brown people, and their collective experiences in the fields and in the Little Manila neighborhood. In the process, Mabalon places Filipinas/os at the center of the development of California agriculture and the urban West.

Yokohama, California

Author: Toshio Mori

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295806427

Category: Fiction

Page: 201

View: 604

Yokohama, California, originally released in 1949, is the first published collection of short stories by a Japanese American. Set in a fictional community, these linked stories are alive with the people, gossip, humor, and legends of Japanese America in the 1930s and 1940s.

The Making of Asian America

A History

Author: Erika Lee

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1476739412

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 5422

"The definitive history of Asian Americans by one of the nation's preeminent scholars on the subject. In the past fifty years, Asian Americans have helped change the face of America and are now the fastest growing group in the United States. But as award-winning historian Erika Lee reminds us, Asian Americans also have deep roots in the country. The Making of Asian America tells the little-known history of Asian Americans and their role in American life, from the arrival of the first Asians in the Americas to the present-day. An epic history of global journeys and new beginnings, this book shows how generations of Asian immigrants and their American-born descendants have made and remade Asian American life in the United States: sailors who came on the first trans-Pacific ships in the 1500s; indentured "coolies" who worked alongside African slaves in the Caribbean; and Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, and South Asian immigrants who were recruited to work in the United States only to face massive racial discrimination, Asian exclusion laws, and for Japanese Americans, incarceration during World War II. Over the past fifty years, a new Asian America has emerged out of community activism and the arrival of new immigrants and refugees. No longer a "despised minority," Asian Americans are now held up as America's "model minorities" in ways that reveal the complicated role that race still plays in the United States. Published to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the passage of the United States' Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 that has remade our "nation of immigrants," this is a new and definitive history of Asian Americans. But more than that, it is a new way of understanding America itself, its complicated histories of race and immigration, and its place in the world today"--

Growing Up Brown

Memoirs of a Filipino American

Author: Peter M. Jamero, Sr.

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295802146

Category: Social Science

Page: 348

View: 1697

"I may have been like other boys, but there was a major difference -- my family included 80 to 100 single young men residing in a Filipino farm-labor camp. It was as a �campo� boy that I first learned of my ancestral roots and the sometimes tortuous path that Filipinos took in sailing halfway around the world to the promise that was America. It was as a campo boy that I first learned the values of family, community, hard work, and education. As a campo boy, I also began to see the two faces of America, a place where Filipinos were at once welcomed and excluded, were considered equal and were discriminated against. It was a place where the values of fairness and freedom often fell short when Filipinos put them to the test.�"-- Peter Jamero Peter Jamero�s story of hardship and success illuminates the experience of what he calls the �bridge generation� -- the American-born children of the Filipinos recruited as farm workers in the 1920s and 30s. Their experiences span the gap between these early immigrants and those Filipinos who owe their U.S. residency to the liberalization of immigration laws in 1965. His book is a sequel of sorts to Carlos Bulosan�s America Is in the Heart, with themes of heartbreaking struggle against racism and poverty and eventual triumph. Jamero describes his early life in a farm-labor camp in Livingston, California, and the path that took him, through naval service and graduate school, far beyond Livingston. A longtime community activist and civic leader, Jamero describes decades of toil and progress before the Filipino community entered the sociopolitical mainstream. He shares a wealth of anecdotes and reflections from his career as an executive of health and human service programs in Sacramento, Washington, D.C., Seattle, and San Francisco.

This Is All I Choose to Tell

History and Hybridity in Vietnamese American Literature

Author: Isabelle Thuy Pelaud

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 9781439902165

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 216

View: 3482

In the first book-length study of Vietnamese American literature, Isabelle Thuy Pelaud probes the complexities of Vietnamese American identity and politics. She provides an analytical introduction to the literature, showing how generational differences play out in genre and text. In addition, she asks, can the term Vietnamese American be disassociated from representations of the war without erasing its legacy? Pelaud delineates the historical, social, and cultural terrains of the writing as well as the critical receptions and responses to them. She moves beyond the common focus on the Vietnam war to develop an interpretive framework that integrates post-colonialism with the multi-generational refugee, immigrant, and transnational experiences at the center of Vietnamese American narratives. Her readings of key works, such as Andrew Pham's Catfish and Mandala and Lan Cao's Monkey Bridge show how trauma, racism, class and gender play a role in shaping the identities of Vietnamese American characters and narrators.

No-no Boy

Author: John Okada

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 9780295955254

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 260

View: 9523

In the aftermath of World War II, Ichiro, a Japanese American, returns home to Seattle to make a new start after two years in an internment camp and two years in prison for refusing to be drafted

Flippin'

Filipinos on America

Author: Luis Francia,Eric Gamalinda

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 377

View: 5514

The Philippines, America's "showcase democracy and its only former colony in Asia, remains enigmatic to most Americans. What we know of this archipelago is very often condensed, filtered, or distorted by Western preconceptions and interpretations. Here, for the first time, are Filipino and Filipino American writers telling their lives in their own words. Here are stories of passion and betrayal, home and exile, the politics of the self and a nation in search of itself. Here are poems of such power and beauty that can rank among the best in the world. In these pages the reader will find familiar figures-the greedy Marcoses, teenage gangs, game shows, rock star clones-as well as characters and themes of every stripe and hue, from gay youngsters checking out surfer jocks in Hawai'i to Westernized girls coming out of convent school, from a searing recollection of gang rape to meditations on the spirit. Altogether, these works provide a deeper image of the Philippines and of Filipinos in America, as seen by some of the best writers from both sides of the world. Ultimately, it gives a unique and vivid perspective of America as well.

Nisei Daughter

Author: Monica Itoi Sone

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 9780295956886

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 238

View: 604

Tells the story of a Japanese-American woman growing up in Seattle in the 1930s who was subjected to relocation during World War II

A New History of Asian America

Author: Shelley Sang-Hee Lee

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135071063

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 3312

A New History of Asian America is a fresh and up-to-date history of Asians in the United States from the late eighteenth century to the present. Drawing on current scholarship, Shelley Lee brings forward the many strands of Asian American history, highlighting the distinctive nature of the Asian American experience while placing the narrative in the context of the major trajectories and turning points of U.S. history. Covering the history of Filipinos, Koreans, Asian Indians, and Southeast Indians as well as Chinese and Japanese, the book gives full attention to the diversity within Asian America. A robust companion website features additional resources for students, including primary documents, a timeline, links, videos, and an image gallery. From the building of the transcontinental railroad to the celebrity of Jeremy Lin, people of Asian descent have been involved in and affected by the history of America. A New History of Asian America gives twenty-first-century students a clear, comprehensive, and contemporary introduction to this vital history.

Turtles All the Way Down

Author: John Green

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0525555358

Category: Young Adult Fiction

Page: 304

View: 2185

“Wrenching and revelatory.” An instant #1 bestseller, the widely acclaimed Turtles All the Way Down is John Green's brilliant and shattering new novel. “A tender story about learning to cope when the world feels out of control.” – People Sixteen-year-old Aza never intended to pursue the mystery of fugitive billionaire Russell Pickett, but there’s a hundred-thousand-dollar reward at stake and her Best and Most Fearless Friend, Daisy, is eager to investigate. So together, they navigate the short distance and broad divides that separate them from Russell Pickett’s son, Davis. Aza is trying. She is trying to be a good daughter, a good friend, a good student, and maybe even a good detective, while also living within the ever-tightening spiral of her own thoughts. In his long-awaited return, John Green, the acclaimed, award-winning author of Looking for Alaska and The Fault in Our Stars, shares Aza’s story with shattering, unflinching clarity in this brilliant novel of love, resilience, and the power of lifelong friendship.

The Cambridge Companion to Literature of the American West

Author: Steven Frye

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107095379

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 284

View: 8331

This Companion provides a comprehensive introduction to the literature of the American West, one of the most vibrant and diverse literary traditions.