America Observed

On an International Anthropology of the United States

Author: Virginia R. Dominguez,Jasmin Habib

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1785333615

Category: Social Science

Page: 188

View: 5631

There is surprisingly little fieldwork done on the United States by anthropologists from abroad. America Observed fills that gap by bringing into greater focus empirical as well as theoretical implications of this phenomenon. Edited by Virginia Dominguez and Jasmin Habib, the essays collected here offer a critique of such an absence, exploring its likely reasons while also illustrating the advantages of studying fieldwork-based anthropological projects conducted by colleagues from outside the U.S. This volume contains an introduction written by the editors and fieldwork-based essays written by Helena Wulff, Jasmin Habib, Limor Darash, Ulf Hannerz, and Moshe Shokeid, and reflections on the broad issue written by Geoffrey White, Keiko Ikeda, and Jane Desmond. Suitable for introductory and mid-level anthropology courses, America Observed will also be useful for American Studies courses both in the U.S. and elsewhere.

Sociolinguistics

An International Handbook of the Science of Language and Society

Author: Ulrich Ammon

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 9783110141894

Category: Sociolinguistics

Page: N.A

View: 9608

An Anthropology of Biomedicine

Author: Margaret Lock,Vinh-Kim Nguyen

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1405110724

Category: Medical

Page: 506

View: 4933

"By convincingly articulating critical medical anthropology and social studies of science, analyzing questions emerging from the most recent technologies in medicine and reflecting on public health issues in developing countries, this book will become a reference for social scientists and more broadly for all those interested in contemporary changes and challenges." Didier Fassin, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, and Ecole des Hautes Eludes en Sciences Sociales, Paris "An Anthropology of Biomedicine is a magisterial review of the knowledge claims of biomedicine that establishes the salience of local biologies in the field of global health. Original and compelling - it is a stunning achievement." Veena Das, Johns Hoplcins University "Because Lock and Nguyen take seriously the ongoing co-constitution of diverse biological and social bodies-human, microbial, and more-they have written a timely, densely ethnographic, theoretically astute, and necessary book. This book proposes an anthropology of biomedicine as technology that can better contribute to actually realizing health as a basic human right globally." Donna Haraway, University of California, Santa cruz "An Anthropology of Biomedicine introduces biomedicine from an anthropological perspective, exploring the entanglement of material bodies with history, environment, culture, and politics. Focusing on the ways in which the application of biomedical technologies bring about radical changes to societies at large, medical anthropologist Margaret Lock and physician and medical anthropologist Vinh-Kim Nguyen advance the theory that the human body in health and illness is not an ontological given but a moveable, malleable entity that is the elusive product of nature and culture. Tracking the historic global application of biomedical technologies, the authors reveal the intended and unintended local consequences and the exacerbation of global inequalities and health disparities that such technologies bring about.

American Indian Medicine

Author: Virgil J. Vogel

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806189770

Category: Social Science

Page: 622

View: 4340

The purpose of this book, says the author, is to show the effect of Indian medicinal practices on white civilization. Actually it achieves far more. It discusses Indian theories of disease and methods of combating disease and even goes into the question of which diseases were indigenous and which were brought to the Indian by the white man. It also lists Indian drugs that have won acceptance in the Pharmacopeia of the United States and the National Formulary. The influence of American Indian healing arts on the medicine and healing and pharmacology of the white man was considerable. For example, such drugs as insulin and penicillin were anticipated in rudimentary form by the aborigines. Coca leaves were used as narcotics by Peruvian Indians hundreds of years before Carl Koller first used cocaine as a local anesthetic in 1884. All together, about 170 medicines, mostly botanical, were contributed to the official compendia by Indians north of the Rio Grande, about 50 more coming from natives of the Latin-American and Caribbean regions. Impressions and attitudes of early explorers, settlers, physicians, botanists, and others regarding Indian curative practices are reported by geographical regions, with British, French, and Spanish colonies and the young United States separately treated. Indian theories of disease—sorcery, taboo violation, spirit intrusion, soul loss, unfulfilled dreams and desires, and so on -and shamanistic practices used to combat them are described. Methods of treating all kinds of injuries-from fractures to snakebite-and even surgery are included. The influence of Indian healing lore upon folk or domestic medicine, as well as on the "Indian doctors" and patent medicines, are discussed. For the convenience of the reader, an index of botanical names is provided, together with a wide variety of illustrations. The disproportionate attention that has been given to the superstitious and unscientific features of aboriginal medicine has tended to obscure its real contributions to American civilization.

Indigenous Peoples of North America

A Concise Anthropological Overview

Author: Robert J. Muckle

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442604166

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 7414

Most books dealing with North American Indigenous peoples are exhaustive in coverage. They provide in-depth discussion of various culture areas which, while valuable, sometimes means that the big picture context is lost. This book offers a corrective to that trend by providing a concise, thematic overview of the key issues facing Indigenous peoples in North America, from prehistory to the present. It integrates a culture area analysis within a thematic approach, covering archaeology, traditional lifeways, the colonial era, and contemporary Indigenous culture. Muckle also explores the history of the relationship between Indigenous peoples and anthropologists with rigor and honesty. The result is a remarkably comprehensive book that provides a strong grounding for understanding Indigenous cultures in North America.

Scrambling for Africa

AIDS, Expertise, and the Rise of American Global Health Science

Author: Johanna Tayloe Crane

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801469058

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 4559

Countries in sub-Saharan Africa were once dismissed by Western experts as being too poor and chaotic to benefit from the antiretroviral drugs that transformed the AIDS epidemic in the United States and Europe. Today, however, the region is courted by some of the most prestigious research universities in the world as they search for “resource-poor” hospitals in which to base their international HIV research and global health programs. In Scrambling for Africa, Johanna Tayloe Crane reveals how, in the space of merely a decade, Africa went from being a continent largely excluded from advancements in HIV medicine to an area of central concern and knowledge production within the increasingly popular field of global health science. Drawing on research conducted in the U.S. and Uganda during the mid-2000s, Crane provides a fascinating ethnographic account of the transnational flow of knowledge, politics, and research money—as well as blood samples, viruses, and drugs. She takes readers to underfunded Ugandan HIV clinics as well as to laboratories and conference rooms in wealthy American cities like San Francisco and Seattle where American and Ugandan experts struggle to forge shared knowledge about the AIDS epidemic. The resulting uncomfortable mix of preventable suffering, humanitarian sentiment, and scientific ambition shows how global health research partnerships may paradoxically benefit from the very inequalities they aspire to redress. A work of outstanding interdisciplinary scholarship, Scrambling for Africa will be of interest to audiences in anthropology, science and technology studies, African studies, and the medical humanities.

Culture and International Relations

Narratives, Natives and Tourists

Author: Julie Reeves

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134367198

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 4858

Culture and International Relations contextually re-examines the history of international relations in order to explore how the discipline has imported and employed the concept of culture. The author challenges the notion that IR has only been interested in culture since the end of the Cold War by tracing different understandings of culture throughout its history.

American Anthropology, 1888-1920

Papers from the American Anthropologist

Author: Frederica De Laguna,Alfred Irving Hallowell

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803280083

Category: Social Science

Page: 838

View: 5233

The formative years of American anthropology were characterized by intellectual energy and excitement, the identification of key interpretive issues, and the beginnings of a prodigious amount of fieldwork and recording. The American Anthropological Association (AAA) was born as anthropology emerged as a formal discipline with specialized subfields; fieldwork among Native communities proliferated across North America, yielding a wealth of ethnographic information that began to surface in the flagship journal, the American Anthropologist; and researchers increasingly debated and probed deeper into the roots and significance of ritual, myth, language, social organization, and the physical make-up and prehistory of Native Americans. The fifty-five selections in this volume represent the interests of and accomplishments in American anthropology from the establishment of the American Anthropologist through World War I. The articles in their entirety showcase the state of the subfields of anthropology?archaeology, linguistics, physical anthropology, and cultural anthropology?as they were imagined and practiced at the dawn of the twentieth century. Examples of important ethnographic accounts and interpretive debates are also included. Introducing this collection is a historical overview of the beginnings of American anthropology by A. Irving Hallowell, a former president of the AAA.

Understanding Tolowa Histories

Western Hegemonies and Native American Responses

Author: James Collins

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415912075

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 1888

The Native Tolowa of Northern California were displaced and nearly destroyed in the nineteenth century, but they have since struggled to reclaim their language and collective identity. Today they are emerging as a cohesive cultural and political group. In Understanding Tolowa Histories, James Collins presents a complex historical inquiry into the Tolowa, Native American responses to U.S. domination, and Enlightenment political legacies. He incisively analyzes the relation between cultural otherness and political-economic subjugation, the complexities of history and identity, and the discursive dynamics of claiming a place and resisting displacement. In the process, he situates the Tolowa in the larger context of U.S. and Indian histories while developing a critique of contemporary anthropology.

Closing the Achievement Gap from an International Perspective

Transforming STEM for Effective Education

Author: Julia V. Clark

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9400743572

Category: Science

Page: 324

View: 1372

In a changing world that demands new skills, a vital concern of public education is the gap in academic performance between low- and high-achieving students. There is no excuse for the achievement gaps that persist among poor and minority students in schools today. All students can succeed at high levels, regardless of race, ethnicity and economic background. Several countries have successfully confronted inequities in achievement, demonstrating that any school can close achievement gaps regardless of the community they serve, and that all students can achieve at high levels when they are provided with the right opportunities. This book is about understanding what factors selected countries have applied to promote progress and what factors contribute to progress in the closing of achievement gaps. It is about creating opportunities for all students. Closing the Achievement Gap from an International Perspective: Transforming STEM for Effective Education is written in response to rising concern for the improvement of quality education – especially in mathematics and science – provided to all students. The contributors take a systematic view of the subject, beginning with a cross-national analysis of teacher qualifications and the achievement gap that spans 50 countries. The content of the book is organized in sections describing education around the globe: North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia. Individual chapters offer close-up analysis of efforts to close achievement gaps in the U.S. and Canada, Mexico, England, Turkey, China, South Africa and Australia among many others. The contributors provide information on the achievement gap in mathematics and science, review current research, and present strategies for fostering improvement and raising performance with a focus on school-related variables that adversely affect educational outcomes among poor and minority students. The authors of the various chapters looked at how students’ data correlated with classroom practices, teacher instruction and academic programming, as part of their efforts to measure student growth. Qualitative and quantitative data are provided to provide evidence not only of the problem, but also for the solution. The book concludes with a chapter on promoting equality and equity to shrink the achievement gap worldwide.

SIUSA news

Author: N.A

Publisher: Survival International

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 2072

Human Adaptation in the Asian Palaeolithic

Hominin Dispersal and Behaviour during the Late Quaternary

Author: Ryan J. Rabett

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139560808

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 8181

This book examines the first human colonization of Asia and particularly the tropical environments of Southeast Asia during the Upper Pleistocene. In studying the unique character of the Asian archaeological record, it reassesses long-accepted propositions about the development of human 'modernity.' Ryan J. Rabett reveals an evolutionary relationship between colonization, the challenges encountered during this process – especially in relation to climatic and environmental change – and the forms of behaviour that emerged. This book argues that human modernity is not something achieved in the remote past in one part of the world, but rather is a diverse, flexible, responsive and ongoing process of adaptation.

Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women

Global Women's Issues and Knowledge

Author: Cheris Kramarae,Dale Spender

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135963150

Category: Reference

Page: 2050

View: 5578

For a full list of entries and contributors, sample entries, and more, visit the Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women website. Featuring comprehensive global coverage of women's issues and concerns, from violence and sexuality to feminist theory, the Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women brings the field into the new millennium. In over 900 signed A-Z entries from US and Europe, Asia, the Americas, Oceania, and the Middle East, the women who pioneered the field from its inception collaborate with the new scholars who are shaping the future of women's studies to create the new standard work for anyone who needs information on women-related subjects.

Japanese Lessons

A Year in a Japanese School Through the Eyes of An American Anthropologist and Her Children

Author: Gail R. Benjamin

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814723403

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 3739

Gail R. Benjamin reaches beyond predictable images of authoritarian Japanese educators and automaton schoolchildren to show the advantages and disadvantages of a system remarkably different from the American one... --The New York Times Book Review Americans regard the Japanese educational system and the lives of Japanese children with a mixture of awe and indignance. We respect a system that produces higher literacy rates and superior math skills, but we reject the excesses of a system that leaves children with little free time and few outlets for creativity and self-expression. In Japanese Lessons, Gail R. Benjamin recounts her experiences as a American parent with two children in a Japanese elementary school. An anthropologist, Benjamin successfully weds the roles of observer and parent, illuminating the strengths of the Japanese system and suggesting ways in which Americans might learn from it. With an anthropologist's keen eye, Benjamin takes us through a full year in a Japanese public elementary school, bringing us into the classroom with its comforting structure, lively participation, varied teaching styles, and non-authoritarian teachers. We follow the children on class trips and Sports Days and through the rigors of summer vacation homework. We share the experiences of her young son and daughter as they react to Japanese schools, friends, and teachers. Through Benjamin we learn what it means to be a mother in Japan--how minute details, such as the way mothers prepare lunches for children, reflect cultural understandings of family and education. Table of Contents Acknowledgments 1. Getting Started 2. Why Study Japanese Education? 3. Day-to-Day Routines 4. Together at School, Together in Life 5. A Working Vacation and Special Events 6. The Three R's, Japanese Style 7. The Rest of the Day 8. Nagging, Preaching, and Discussions 9. Enlisting Mothers' Efforts 10. Education in Japanese Society 11. Themes and Suggestions 12. Sayonara Appendix. Reading and Writing in Japanese References Index

Elite Communication in Samoa

A Study of Leadership

Author: Felix Maxwell Keesing,Marie Margaret Keesing

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Acculturation

Page: 318

View: 8722

Martha Brae's Two Histories

European Expansion and Caribbean Culture-building in Jamaica

Author: Jean Besson

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9780807854099

Category: Social Science

Page: 393

View: 4265

Based on historical research and more than thirty years of anthropological fieldwork, this wide-ranging study underlines the importance of Caribbean cultures for anthropology, which has generally marginalized Europe's oldest colonial sphere. Located at

Gender and Women's Studies in Canada

Critical Terrain

Author: Margaret Helen Hobbs

Publisher: Canadian Scholars’ Press

ISBN: 0889614849

Category: Feminism

Page: 724

View: 6069

With essays from some of the most influential contemporary feminist writers, such as Jessica Valenti, bell hooks, Afua Cooper, Gloria Steinem, and Kim Anderson, and covering topics as diverse as women with disabilities, transgender rights, abortion, ageism, and Tyra Banks, this collection goes beyond the Canadian context to form an ideal introductory-level textbook for the contemporary gender studies classroom. Reflecting the intersectional nature of feminist thought today, these essays incorporate voices from across multiple marginalities, discussing gender, race, class, Aboriginality, ability, age, sexuality, and weight. A unique combination of scholarly articles, news clips, fact sheets, blog posts, poetry, short fiction, and personal narratives keep the collection engaging and varied. Editors Margaret Hobbs and Carla Rice have compiled a comprehensive introduction to the past, present, and future of gender and women's studies in Canada. Features: includes feminist theory and scholarship stemming from multiple disciplines such as sociology, psychology, Indigenous studies, cultural studies, health studies, Canadian studies, political economy, and anthropology provides a strong foundation in the history of the field, while also offering fresh perspectives that point toward the future direction of this meaningful area of inquiry contains rich pedagogy, including critical thinking questions, statistics, and activist insights

Anthropologies of Medicine

A Colloquium on West European and North American Perspectives

Author: Beatrix Pfleiderer,Gilles Bibeau

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 3322878597

Category: Social Science

Page: 275

View: 5050

Society and History

Essays in Honor of Karl August Wittfogel

Author: G. L. Ulman

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 3110814455

Category: Social Science

Page: 527

View: 5444