Americans in Occupied Belgium, 1914-1918

Accounts of the War from Journalists, Tourists, Troops and Medical Staff

Author: Ed Klekowski,Libby Klekowski

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 1476614873

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 8633

Belgium in the First World War--the first country invaded, the longest occupied, and when the war finally ended, the first forgotten. In 1914, Belgium was home to a large American colony which included representatives of American companies, artists, writers and diplomats with the American Legation. After the invasion, American journalists and adventurers flocked there to follow the action; military restrictions on travel were less stringent than in England or France. As the most industrialized country in Europe, Belgium depended upon trade and food imports to support its economy. The war isolated Belgium and wholesale starvation was imminent by the fall of 1914. Herbert Hoover and his Commission for Relief in Belgium raised funds to purchase and import food to sustain Belgium and, eventually, Occupied France as well. Idealistic American volunteers (including some Rhodes scholars) supervised food distribution in the occupation zone. Along the Western Front in Belgium, hundreds of Americans served (illegally) in the British and Canadian armies. This book tells the story of the German invasion, occupation and retreat from the perspective of Americans who were there.

Reporting the First World War in the Liminal Zone

British and American Eyewitness Accounts from the Western Front

Author: Sara Prieto

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319685945

Category: History

Page: 199

View: 4974

This book deals with an aspect of the Great War that has been largely overlooked: the war reportage written based on British and American authors’ experiences at the Western Front. It focuses on how the liminal experience of the First World War was portrayed in a series of works of literary journalism at different stages of the conflict, from the summer of 1914 to the Armistice in November 1918. Sara Prieto explores a number of representative texts written by a series of civilian eyewitness who have been passed over in earlier studies of literature and journalism in the Great War. The texts under discussion are situated in the ‘liminal zone’, as they were written in the middle of a transitional period, half-way between two radically different literary styles: the romantic and idealising ante bellum tradition, and the cynical and disillusioned modernist school of writing. They are also the product of the various stages of a physical and moral journey which took several authors into the fantastic albeit nightmarish world of the Western Front, where their understanding of reality was transformed beyond anything they could have anticipated.

Eyewitnesses to the Great War

American Writers, Reporters, Volunteers and Soldiers in France, 1914-1918

Author: Ed Klekowski,Libby Klekowski

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786492007

Category: History

Page: 261

View: 4676

Beginning with the novelist Edith Wharton, who toured the front in her Mercedes in 1915, this book describes the wartime experiences of American idealists (and a few rogues) on the Western Front and concludes with the doughboys' experiences under General Pershing. Americans were "over there" from the war's beginning in August 1914, and because America was neutral until April 1917, they saw the war from both the French and German lines. Since most of the Americans who served, regardless of which side they were on, were in Champagne and Lorraine, this sector is the focus. Excerpts from.

America and the Great War

1914 - 1920

Author: D. Clayton James,Anne Sharp Wells

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118822935

Category: History

Page: 120

View: 6028

In America and the Great War, 1914-1920, the accomplished writing team of D. Clayton James and Anne Sharp Wells provides a succinct account of the principal military, political, and social developments in United States History as the nation responded to, and was changed by, a world in crisis. A forthright examination of America's unprecedented military commitment and actions abroad, America and the Great War includes insights into the personalities of key Allied officers and civilian leaders as well as the evolution of the new American "citizen soldier." Full coverage is given to President Wilson's beleaguered second term, the experience of Americans-including women, minorities, and recent arrivals-on the home front, and the lasting changes left in the Great War's wake.

War beyond Words

Languages of Remembrance from the Great War to the Present

Author: Jay Winter

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108293476

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 7847

What we know of war is always mediated knowledge and feeling. We need lenses to filter out some of its blinding, terrifying light. These lenses are not fixed; they change over time, and Jay Winter's panoramic history of war and memory offers an unprecedented study of transformations in our imaginings of war, from 1914 to the present. He reveals the ways in which different creative arts have framed our meditations on war, from painting and sculpture to photography, film and poetry, and ultimately to silence, as a language of memory in its own right. He shows how these highly mediated images of war, in turn, circulate through language to constitute our 'cultural memory' of war. This is a major contribution to our understanding of the diverse ways in which men and women have wrestled with the intractable task of conveying what twentieth-century wars meant to them and mean to us.

Headquarters Nights

A Record of Conversations and Experiences at the Headquarters of the German Army in France and Belgium

Author: Vernon Lyman Kellogg

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Belgium

Page: 116

View: 2899

The Women of Royaumont

A Scottish Women's Hospital on the Western Front

Author: Eileen Crofton

Publisher: John Donald

ISBN: 9781862320321

Category: History

Page: 348

View: 3094

This story relates the wartime experiences of a group of women who ran a hospital near the trenches during World War I, often under conditions of great hardship. Told largely through letters home and diaries, this book throws light on wartime conditions a

The Victory at Sea

Author: William Sowden Sims,Burton Jesse Hendrick

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Admirals

Page: 410

View: 9077

The Great War and American Foreign Policy, 1914-24

Author: Robert E. Hannigan

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812293282

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 2534

World War I constituted a milestone in the development of the United States as a world power. As the European powers exhausted themselves during the conflict, the U.S. government deployed its growing economic leverage, its military might, and its diplomacy to shape the outcome of the war and to influence the future of international relations. In The Great War and American Foreign Policy, 1914-1924, Robert E. Hannigan challenges the conventional belief that the United States entered World War I only because its hand was forced, and he disputes the claim that Washington was subsequently driven by a desire to make the world "safe for democracy." Democratic President Woodrow Wilson's rhetoric emphasized peace, self-determination, and international cooperation. But his foreign policy, Hannigan claims, is better understood if analyzed against the backdrop of American policy—not only toward Europe, but also toward East Asia and the rest of the western hemisphere—as it had been developing since the turn of the twentieth century. On the broadest level, Wilson sought to shore up and stabilize an international order promoted and presided over by London since the early 1800s, this in the conviction that under such conditions the United States would inevitably ascend to a global position comparable to, if not eclipsing, that of Great Britain. Hannigan argues, moreover, that these fundamental objectives continued to guide Wilson's Republican successors in their efforts to stabilize the postwar world. The book reexamines the years when the United States was ostensibly neutral (1914-17), the subsequent period of American military involvement (1917-18), the Paris Peace Conference of 1919, the ensuing battle for ratification of the Treaty of Versailles (in 1919-20), and the activities of Wilson's successors—culminating with the Dawes Plan of 1924.

Justice in War Time

Author: Bertrand Russell

Publisher: Haskell House Pub Limited

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 229

View: 3402

Bertrand Russell's theories on war & pacifism up to the time of the First World War. The author deals with the question of war atrocities, war & non-resistance, the future of Anglo-German rivalry, the entente policy of 1904-1915, & the ethics of war.

Killing Time

Archaeology and the First World War

Author: Nicholas Saunders

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 0752476181

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 5869

At the dawn of the twenty-first century, the Great War stands at the furthest edge of living memory. There are a handful of men alive who fought in the trenches of the Somme and Flanders. Within their own lifetimes, their memories have become epic history. Hardly a month passes without some dramatic and sometimes tragic discovery being made along the killing fields of the Western Front. Poignant remains of British soldiers buried during battle and then forgotten - lying in rows arm in arm, or found crouching at the entrance to a dugout. Whole 'underground cities' of trenches, dugouts, and shelters, preserved in the mud of Flanders - with newspapers and blankets scattered where they were left. There are field hospitals carved out of the chalk country of the Somme, tunnels marked with graffiti by long dead hands, and tons of volatile bombs and gas canisters waiting to explode. Yet, while there are innumerable books on the history of the war, there is not a single book on its archaeology. Nicholas J. Saunders' new book is therefore unique. In an authoritative and accessible way, it would bring together widely scattered discoveries, and offer fresh insights into the human dimension of the war.

The Book Publishing Industry

Author: Albert N. Greco

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136850341

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 504

View: 4115

The Book Publishing Industry focuses on consumer books (adult, juvenile, and mass market paperbacks) and reviews all major book categories to present a comprehensive overview of this diverse business. In addition to the insights and portrayals of the U.S. publishing industry, this book includes an appendix containing historical data on the industry from 1946 to the end of the twentieth century. The selective bibliography includes the latest literature, including works in marketing and economics that has a direct relationship with this dynamic industry. This third edition features a chapter on e-books and provides an overview of the current shift toward digital media in the US book publishing industry.

America and the Armenian Genocide of 1915

Author: Jay Winter

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139450188

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 5213

Before Rwanda and Bosnia, and before the Holocaust, the first genocide of the twentieth century happened in Turkish Armenia in 1915, when approximately one million people were killed. This volume is an account of the American response to this atrocity. The first part sets up the framework for understanding the genocide: Sir Martin Gilbert, Vahakn Dadrian and Jay Winter provide an analytical setting for nine scholarly essays examining how Americans learned of this catastrophe and how they tried to help its victims. Knowledge and compassion, though, were not enough to stop the killings. A terrible precedent was born in 1915, one which has come to haunt the United States and other Western countries throughout the twentieth century and beyond. To read the essays in this volume is chastening: the dilemmas Americans faced when confronting evil on an unprecedented scale are not very different from the dilemmas we face today.

Combat Motivation

The Behaviour of Soldiers in Battle

Author: A. Kellett

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9401539650

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 362

View: 6605

"What men will fight for seems to be worth looking into," H. L. Mencken noted shortly after the close of the First World War. Prior to that war, although many military commanders and theorists had throughout history shown an aptitude for devising maxims concerning esprit de corps, fighting spirit, morale, and the like, military organizations had rarely sought either to understand or to promote combat motivation. For example, an officer who graduated from the Royal Military College (Sandhurst) at the end of the nineteenth century later commented that the art of leadership was utterly neglected (Charlton 1931, p. 48), while General Wavell recalled that during his course at the British Staff College at Camberley (1909-1 0) insufficient stress was laid "on the factor of morale, or how to induce it and maintain it'' (quoted in Connell1964, p. 63). The First World War forced commanders and staffs to take account of psychological factors and to anticipate wideJy varied responses to the combat environment because, unlike most previous wars, it was not fought by relatively small and homogeneous armies of regulars and trained reservists. The mobilization by the belligerents of about 65 million men (many of whom were enrolled under duress), the evidence of fairly widespread psychiatric breakdown, and the postwar disillusion (- xiii xiv PREFACE emplified in books like C. E. Montague's Disenchantment, published in 1922) all tended to dispel assumptions and to provoke questions about mo tivation and morale.

France Under Fire

German Invasion, Civilian Flight and Family Survival During World War II

Author: Nicole Dombrowski Risser

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 110702532X

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 5257

A social, military and political history of the French refugee crisis tracing the impact of government responses upon civilian lives.

The Myth of the Good War

America in the Second World War, revised edition

Author: Jacques R. Pauwels

Publisher: James Lorimer & Company

ISBN: 145940873X

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 7985

In the spirit of historians Howard Zinn, Gwynne Dyer, and Noam Chomsky, Jacques Pauwels focuses on the big picture. Like them, he seeks to find the real reasons for the actions of great powers and great leaders. Familiar Second World War figures from Adolf Hitler to Franklin D. Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin are portrayed in a new light in this book. The decisions of Hitler and his Nazi government to go to war were not those of madmen. Britain and the US were not allies fighting shoulder to shoulder with no motive except ridding the world of the evils of Nazism. In Pauwels' account, the actions of the United States during the war years were heavily influenced by American corporations -- IBM, GM, Ford, ITT, and Standard Oil of New Jersey (now called Exxon) -- who were having a very profitable war selling oil, armaments, and equipment to both sides, with money gushing everywhere. Rather than analyzing Pearl Harbor as an unprovoked attack, Pauwels notes that US generals boasted of their success in goading Japan into a war the Americans badly wanted. One chilling account describes why President Truman insisted on using nuclear bombs against Japan when there was no military need to do so. Another reveals that Churchill instructed his bombers to flatten Dresden and kill thousands when the war was already won, to demonstrate British-American strength to Stalin. Leaders usually cast in a heroic mould in other books about this war look quite different here. Nations that claimed a higher purpose in going to war are shown to have had far less idealistic motives. The Second World War, as Jacques Pauwels tells it, was a good war only in myth. The reality is far messier -- and far more revealing of the evils that come from conflicts between great powers and great leaders seeking to enrich their countries and dominate the world.

The History of the Studebaker Corporation

(1918)

Author: Albert Erskine

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 3845711876

Category: Transportation

Page: 100

View: 6477

In diesem Buch aus dem Jahre 1918 beschreibt Albert Erskine kurz und prägnant die Geschichte des wohl fortschrittlichsten Automobilbauers seiner Zeit, Henry Studebaker. In den Jahren 1852 bis 1966 widmete sich der passionierte Wagenhersteller dem technischen Fortschritt, stellte zunächst Metallteile her, um sich später den Motorfahrzeugen zu widmen.

The Iron Cage

The Story of the Palestinian Struggle for Statehood

Author: Rashid Khalidi

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 9780807003091

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 3369

A timely and compelling examination of the Palestinian dilemma, named one of the 100 best books of the year by Publishers Weekly This story of the Palestinian search to establish a state begins in the era of British control over Palestine and stretches between the two world wars and into the present, offering much-needed perspective for anyone concerned about peace in the Middle East. "Rashid Khalidi is a historian's historian. The Iron Cage is his most accomplished effort to date . . . Magisterial in scope, meticulous in its attention to detail, and decidedly dispassionate in its analysis, The Iron Cage is destined to be a benchmark of its genre." -Joel Schalit, Tikkun "At heart a historical essay, an effort to decide why the Palestinians . . . have failed to achieve an independent state." -Steven Erlanger, New York Times "Khalidi, tackling 'historical amnesia,'brilliantly analyses the structural handicap which hobbled the Palestinians throughout 30 years of British rule . . . Khalidi restores the Palestinians to something more than victims, acknowledging that for all their disadvantages, they have played their role and can (and must) still do so to determine their own fate." -Ian Black, Guardian "Khalidi uses history to provide a clear-eyed view of the region and assess the prospects for peace. He strives successfully for even-handedness." -Anthony Lewis, author of Gideon's Trumpet and Make No Law