Eric Sloane's An Age of Barns

Author: Eric Sloane

Publisher: Voyageur Press

ISBN: 9780896585652

Category: Architecture

Page: 94

View: 5953

This is a re-issue of Sloane's classic folksy history of barn folklore, architecture, and history, which has been out of print for twenty years. "Eric Sloane's An Age of Barns" is filled with fabulous black-and-white illustrations from this great American artist. Covering all types of American and Canadian barns and everything associated with them-implements and tools, hex signs, silos, out buildings, hinges, barn raising, and more-"Eric Sloane's An Age of Barns" is a spectacular album tribute to this important facet of our architecture and agriculture. This book is sure to once again become a collector's item.

Round Barns of New York

Author: Richard Triumpho

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815607960

Category: History

Page: 113

View: 3217

This book begins with an overview of the first five round barns built across America, including one in New York State Elliott Stewart, who built the first octagon barn in the Empire State in 1874, is revealed to be a passionate original whose vigorous editorial campaign led to the construction of a dozen such barns. The author next introduces John McArthur who constructed a polygonal (sixteen-sided, double octagon) barn so huge it was the biggest in the state and second largest in the nation! Case histories document five other singular New York barns of varying configurations. Abundant photos make these bygone barns spring to life. Floor plans of the earliest barns show why the round shape engaged farmers at the turn of the century. The book also explains why true-round barns, born of silos, surpassed octagon barns in popularity. data and rare anecdotes by present owners. This fascinating chronicle shows how these eccentric barns rose to fashion, why so few survived in New York State, and why the remaining are worth studying - and preserving - as legitimate architecture and as a record of agricultural progress in New York.

Barns of Wisconsin (Revised Edition)

Author: Jerry Apps

Publisher: Wisconsin Historical Society

ISBN: 0870205196

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 6459

In this new edition of his classic book, award-winning author Jerry Apps shares a unique perspective on the great barns of rural Wisconsin. Digging deep as both an enthusiast and a farmer, Apps reaps a story of change: from the earliest pioneer structures to the low steel buildings of modern dairy farms, barns have adapted to meet the needs of each generation. They’ve housed wheat, tobacco, potatoes, and dairy cows, and they display the optimism, ingenuity, hard work, and practicality of the people who tend land and livestock. Featuring more than 100 stunning full-color photographs by Steve Apps, plus dozens of historic images, Barns of Wisconsin illuminates a vanishing way of life. The book explores myriad barn designs—from rectangular to round, from gable roof to gambrel, from fieldstone to wood—always with an eye to the history and craftsmanship of the Norwegians, Germans, Swiss, Finns, and others who built and used them. Barns of Wisconsin captures both the iconic and the unique, including historic and noteworthy barns, and discusses the disappearance of barns from our landscape and preservation efforts to save these important symbols of American agriculture.

The Age of the Aviator

Author: James Crawford

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 1411698096

Category: Fiction

Page: 396

View: 4727

THE AGE OF THE AVIATOR is the story of a unique period in history. It was a time when no one was yet certain of the potential of flight and when the task of testing its limits fell to a handful of eccentric and ingenious daredevils. This sweeping novel describes the century-long life of one such adventurer: someone who loved danger more than safety; a man of common origins who rose to uncommon heights and lifted up a generation of people with him.

Texas Log Buildings

A Folk Architecture

Author: Terry G. Jordan

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292780516

Category: Architecture

Page: 240

View: 6333

Once too numerous to attract attention, the log buildings of Texas now stand out for their rustic beauty. This book preserves a record of the log houses, stores, inns, churches, schools, jails, and barns that have already become all too few in the Texas countryside. Terry Jordan explores the use of log buildings among several different Texas cultural groups and traces their construction techniques from their European and eastern American origins.

Encyclopedia of the Age of Political Revolutions and New Ideologies, 1760-1815

Author: Gregory Fremont-Barnes

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0313049513

Category: History

Page: 944

View: 7293

Covered in this encyclopedia are the people, events, and ideas that shaped the transformative political ideologies arising from the American and French Revolutions of the late eighteenth century.

The New World Dutch Barn

The Evolution, Forms, and Structure of a Disappearing Icon

Author: John Fitchen,Gregory D. Huber

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815606901

Category: Architecture

Page: 224

View: 6197

This architectural study updates John Fitchen's original with extensive new material. Added to Fitchen's descriptions of barn types, framing style and exterior appearance is research information that relates to the form, fabric and essence of each Dutch barn in the United States.

Architecture of Regionalism in the Age of Globalization

Peaks and Valleys in the Flat World

Author: Liane Lefaivre,Alexander Tzonis

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0415575788

Category: Architecture

Page: 221

View: 551

The definitive introductory book on the theory and history of regionalist architecture in the context of globalization, this text addresses issues of identity, community, and sustainability along with a selection of the most outstanding examples of design from all over the world. Alex Tzonis and Liane Lefaivre give a readable, vivid, scholarly account of this major conflict as it relates to the design of the human-made environment. Demystifying the reasons behind how globalization enabled creativity and brought about unprecedented wealth but also produced new wastefulness and ecological destruction, the book also looks at how regionalism has also tended to confine, tearing apart societies and promoting destructive consumerist tourism.

Religion and Society in the Age of St. Augustine

Author: Peter Brown

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 1556351747

Category: Religion

Page: 352

View: 1676

Peter Brown, author of the celebrated 'Augustine of Hippo', has here gathered together his seminal articles and papers on the rapidly changing world of Saint Augustine. The collection is wide-ranging, dealing with political theory, social history, church history, historiography, theology, history of religions, and social anthropology. Saint Augustine is, of course, the central figure; and in an important introduction Peter Brown explains how the preoccupations of these essays led him to write the prize-winning biography. Brown then goes on to explore the heart of Augustine's political theory, not only showing how it factors in Augustine's thought, but also pointing to what is different from and similar to twentieth-century political thought.

The Fiction of Julian Barnes

Author: Vanessa Guignery

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 1137201010

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 176

View: 1181

Julian Barnes's work has been marked by great variety, ranging not only from conventional fiction to postmodernist experimentation in such well-known novels as Flaubert's Parrot (1984) and A History of the World in 10 1⁄2 Chapters (1989), but also from witty essays to deeply touching short stories. The responses of readers and critics have likewise varied, from enthusiasm to scepticism, as the substantial volume of critical analysis demonstrates. This Readers' Guide provides a comprehensive and accessible overview of the essential criticism on Barnes's work, drawing from a selection of reviews, interviews, essays and books. Through the presentation and assessment of key critical interpretations, Vanessa Guignery provides the most wide-ranging examination of his fiction and non-fiction so far, considering key issues such as his use of language, his treatment of history, obsession, love, and the relationship between fact and fiction. Covering all of the novels to date, from Metroland (1981) to Arthur and George (2005), this is an invaluable introduction to the work of one of Britain's most exciting and popular contemporary writers.

The Old South's Modern Worlds

Slavery, Region, and Nation in the Age of Progress

Author: L. Diane Barnes,Brian Schoen,Frank Towers

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195384016

Category: History

Page: 331

View: 4032

Before the Civil War, America's slave states were enmeshed in the modernizing trends of their time but that history has been obscured by a deeply ingrained view of the Old South as an insular society with few outward connections. The Old South's Modern Worlds looks beyond this myth of an isolated and backward-looking South to identify some of the many ways that the modern world shaped antebellum southern society. Removing the screen of southern traditionalism turns up new stories about slaves as religious missionaries, Native Americans as hard-driving capitalists, cotton cultivators as genetic scientists, proslavery politicians as nationalists, and planters as experimenters in sexuality. The essays gathered in this volume not only tell these jarringly modern tales of the Old South, they also explore the compatibility of slavery - the defining feature of antebellum southern life - and cultural and material markers of modernity such as moral reform, cities, and industry. The Old South emerges from this volume in a new relationship to national and global histories. Considered as proponents of American manifest destiny, antebellum southern politicians look more like nationalists and less like separatists. Southerners' enthusiasm for humanitarian missions and their debates with moral reformers across the Atlantic bring out the global currents that cut against the localism of southern life. The roles that cities played in marketing, policing, and leasing slaves counteracted the erosion of slave discipline in urban settings. The turmoil that changes in Asian and European agriculture wrought among southern staple producers show the interconnections between seemingly isolated southern farms and markets in distant lands. Diverse and riddled with contradictory impulses, antebellum southerners encounters with modernity reveal the often discomforting legacies left by the Old South on the future of America and the world.

The Age of Lincoln and the Art of American Power, 1848-1876

Author: William Nester

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN: 1612346596

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 7387

Although Abraham Lincoln was among seven presidents who served during the tumultuous years between the end of the Mexican War and the end of the Reconstruction era, history has not been kind to the others: Zachary Taylor, Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, Andrew Johnson, and Ulysses S. Grant. In contrast, history sees Abraham Lincoln as a giant in character and deeds. During his presidency, he governed brilliantly, developed the economy, liberated four million people from slavery, reunified the nation, and helped enact the Homestead Act, among other accomplishments. He proved to be not only an outstanding commander in chief but also a skilled diplomat, economist, humanist, educator, and moralist. Lincoln achieved that and more because he was a master of the art of American power. He understood that the struggle for hearts and minds was the essence of politics in a democracy. He asserted power mostly by appealing to peopleÆs hopes rather than their fears. All along he tried to shape rather than reflect prevailing public opinions that differed from his own. To that end, he was brilliant at bridging the gap between progressives and conservatives by reining in the former and urging on the latter. His art of power ultimately reflected his unswerving devotion to the Declaration of IndependenceÆs principles and the ConstitutionÆs institutions, or as he so elegantly expressed it, ôto a government of the people, by the people, and for the people.ö

The Late Age of Print

Everyday Book Culture from Consumerism to Control

Author: Ted Striphas

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231519648

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 4374

Ted Striphas argues that, although the production and propagation of books have undoubtedly entered a new phase, printed works are still very much a part of our everyday lives. With examples from trade journals, news media, films, advertisements, and a host of other commercial and scholarly materials, Striphas tells a story of modern publishing that proves, even in a rapidly digitizing world, books are anything but dead. From the rise of retail superstores to Oprah's phenomenal reach, Striphas tracks the methods through which the book industry has adapted (or has failed to adapt) to rapid changes in twentieth-century print culture. Barnes & Noble, Borders, and Amazon.com have established new routes of traffic in and around books, and pop sensations like Harry Potter and the Oprah Book Club have inspired the kind of brand loyalty that could only make advertisers swoon. At the same time, advances in digital technology have presented the book industry with extraordinary threats and unique opportunities. Striphas's provocative analysis offers a counternarrative to those who either triumphantly declare the end of printed books or deeply mourn their passing. With wit and brilliant insight, he isolates the invisible processes through which books have come to mediate our social interactions and influence our habits of consumption, integrating themselves into our routines and intellects like never before.

Writing Dancing in the Age of Postmodernism

Author: Sally Banes

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 9780819562685

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 412

View: 4163

A leading critic traces three decades of contemporary dance from Balanchine to breakdancing

Public Economics in an Age of Austerity

Author: Tony Atkinson,Anthony Barnes Atkinson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781138018150

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 112

View: 4349

Governments all round the world are facing problems with their public finances. At a time of austerity, how much should spending be cut and how much should taxes be raised? Does the national debt represent a burden for future generations? Should taxes on the rich be raised? This book examines how the tools of public economics can be applied to answer such key questions and to suggest alternatives to the austerity policies currently being pursued. The fiscal problems faced are not simply the result of the post-2008 economic crisis but reflect a deep-seated fault line in modern economies. There has to be fiscal consolidation to provide for an ageing population, increased investment in education, and climate change. The book describes how public economics can help us think about alternative ways of meeting this challenge. It casts doubt on conventionally held views, such as those concerned with top tax rates, the undesirability of taxing capital income, the targeting of child benefits, and the merging of income tax and social security contributions. The final part goes beyond national boundaries and considers global public economics, focusing on the pressing problem of financing development. The conclusion of the book is that there are significant choices to be made. Not all austerity packages are the same: there are alternatives. It would be possible to raise taxes more and to cut spending less. It is important to consider the full range of possible policies. In considering these alternatives, modern public economics provides a useful framework, but it has major limitations. Economists are too often prisoners within the theoretical walls they have erected and fail to see that important considerations are missing. Economists have paid too little attention to the ethical basis underlying their policy recommendations.

Mobile Media Making in an Age of Smartphones

Author: M. Berry,M. Schleser

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137469811

Category: Social Science

Page: 164

View: 6054

With the rise of smartphones and the proliferation of applications, the ways everyday media users and creative professionals represent, experience, and share the everyday is changing. This collection reflects on emergent creative practices and digital ethnographies of new socialities associated with smartphone cameras in everyday life.

English Common Law in the Age of Mansfield

Author: James Oldham

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807864005

Category: Law

Page: 448

View: 9967

In the eighteenth century, the English common law courts laid the foundation that continues to support present-day Anglo-American law. Lord Mansfield, Chief Justice of the Court of King's Bench, 1756-1788, was the dominant judicial force behind these developments. In this abridgment of his two-volume book, The Mansfield Manuscripts and the Growth of English Law in the Eighteenth Century, James Oldham presents the fundamentals of the English common law during this period, with a detailed description of the operational features of the common law courts. This work includes revised and updated versions of the historical and analytical essays that introduced the case transcriptions in the original volumes, with each chapter focusing on a different aspect of the law. While considerable scholarship has been devoted to the eighteenth-century English criminal trial, little attention has been given to the civil side. This book helps to fill that gap, providing an understanding of the principal body of substantive law with which America's founding fathers would have been familiar. It is an invaluable reference for practicing lawyers, scholars, and students of Anglo-American legal history.

Refiguring Modernism: Postmodern feminist readings of Woolf, West, and Barnes

Author: Bonnie Kime,Bonnie Kime Scott

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253210029

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 217

View: 8312

"... an invaluable aid to the reconfiguration of literary modernism and of the history of the fiction of the first three decades of the twentieth century." —Novel "... her readings of texts are quite smart and eminently readable." —Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature "... a challenging and discerning study of the modernist period." —James Joyce Broadsheet (note: review of volume 1 only) "... highly important and beautifully written, constructing a contextually rich cultural history of Anglo-American modernism. It wears its meticulous erudition lightly, synthesizing an enormous amount of research, much of it original archival work." —Signs "Through her thoughtful exploration of the lives and work of these three female modernists, Scott shapes a new feminist literary history that successfully reconfigures modernism." —Woolf Studies Annual In this revisionary study of modernism, Bonnie Kime Scott focuses on the literary and cultural contexts that shaped Virginia Woolf, Rebecca West, and Djuna Barnes. Her reading is based upon fresh archival explorations, combining postmodern with feminist theory.