Ancient and Medieval Dyes

Author: William F. Leggett

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 1930585896

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 80

View: 9576

Leggett's classic text, Ancient and Medieval Dyes, is an informative and easy-to-read introduction to the most common animal and vegetable dyes used before the introduction of synthetic chemical dyes.

Color in Ancient and Medieval East Asia

Author: Mary M. Dusenbury

Publisher: Other Distribution

ISBN: 9780300212990

Category: Art

Page: 288

View: 8601

With essays by Monica Bethe, Mary M Dusenbury, Shih-shan Susan Huang, Ikumi Kaminishi, Guolong Lai, Richard Laursen, Liu Jian and Zhao Feng, Chika Mouri, Park Ah-rim, Hillary Pedersen, Lisa Shekede and Su Bomin, Sim Yeon-ok and Lee Seonyong, Tanaka Yoko, and Zhao Feng and Long Bo Color was a critical element in East Asian life and thought, but its importance has been largely overlooked in Western scholarship. This interdisciplinary volume explores the fascinating roles that color played in the society, politics, thought, art, and ritual practices of ancient and medieval East Asia (ca. 1600 B.C.E.-ca. 1400 C.E.). While the Western world has always linked color with the spectrum of light, in East Asian civilizations colors were associated with the specific plant or mineral substances from which they were derived. Many of these substances served as potent medicines and elixirs, and their transformative powers were extended to the dyes and pigments they produced. Generously illustrated, this groundbreaking publication constitutes the first inclusive study of color in East Asia. It is the outcome of years of collaboration between chemists, conservators, archaeologists, historians of art and literature, and scholars of Buddhism and Daoism from the United States, East Asia, and Europe.

Discoveries: Colors

The Story of Dyes and Pigments

Author: François Delamare,Bernard Guineau

Publisher: Harry N Abrams Incorporated

ISBN: N.A

Category: Art

Page: 159

View: 8189

Chronicles the history of dyes and pigments and their related industries, discussing colors in the Middle Ages; the explosion of supply and demand in the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries; and advances in industrial chemistry.

Colour Design

Theories and Applications

Author: Janet Best

Publisher: Woodhead Publishing

ISBN: 0081018894

Category: Psychology

Page: 704

View: 3155

Colour Design: Theories and Applications, Second Edition, provides information on a broad spectrum of colour subjects written by seasoned industry professionals and academics. It is a multidisciplinary book that addresses the use of colour across a range of industries, with a particular focus on textile colouration. Part One deals with the human visual system, colour perception and colour psychology, while Part Two focuses on the practical application of colour in design, including specifically in textiles and fashion. Part Three covers cultural and historical aspects of colour, as well as recent developments, addressing areas such as dyes and pigments, architecture, colour theory, virtual reality games, colour printing, website development, and sustainability. This revised, expanded, and updated edition reflects recent technological developments, and new industry priorities. Bringing together the science of colouration and the more artistic elements of design, this book supports students, academics, and industry professionals in developing a deep knowledge of colour use. It will also be an important reference for those involved in textile dyeing, design and manufacture. Provides a comprehensive review of the issues surrounding the use of color in textiles Discusses the application of color across a wide range of industries, supporting interdisciplinary knowledge and research Offers a revised, expanded, and updated look that reflects the rise of new technology and industry priorities

The Chemical History of Color

Author: Mary Virginia Orna

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 3642326420

Category: Science

Page: 153

View: 2980

In this brief, Mary Virginia Orna details the history of color from the chemical point of view. Beginning with the first recorded uses of color and ending in the development of our modern chemical industry, this rich, yet concise exposition shows us how color pervades every aspect of our lives. Our consciousness, our perceptions, our useful appliances and tools, our playthings, our entertainment, our health, and our diagnostic apparatus – all involve color and are based in no small part on chemistry.

Transnationalism in Ancient and Medieval Societies

The Role of Cross-Border Trade and Travel

Author: Michael C. Howard

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786490330

Category: History

Page: 313

View: 6694

"This study of early transnational relations explores the routine interaction of people across the boundaries of empires, tribal confederacies, kingdoms, and city-states. It examines obstacles voyagers faced, relatively poor geographical knowledge, and dangers of a fragmented and shifting political landscape, and reveals the important political, economic, and cultural role cross-border trade and travel played in ancient society"--Provided by publisher.

The Dyer's Handbook

Memoirs of an 18th Century Master Colourist

Author: Dominique Cardon

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 1785702122

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 160

View: 7795

Persian blue, pomegranate flower, spiny lobster, wine soup, pale flesh, dove breast, golden wax, grass green, green sand, rotten olive, modest plum, agate, rich French gray, gunpowder of the English........just some of the colour names of old fabric to fire the imagination. Memoirs on Dyeing concerns a unique manuscript from the eighteenth century; a dyers memoirs from Languedoc, containing recipes for dyes with corresponding colour samples. It is an exceptional document, hugely rare and of great significance not only to textile historians but dyers and colourists today, as thanks to the information in the manuscript the colours can be reproduced exactly, with the same ingredients, or reproduced using modern techniques by matching the colour samples. To the English translation of the text, together with facsimile pages reproduced in colour from the original manuscript, are added essays meant to situate it in its historical, economic and technological contexts. For those historians who have long been fascinated by the change in scale and the amount of innovation that occurred in woollen cloth production in Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries, the Memoirs on Dyeing bring first-hand insight into the daily preoccupations and tasks of a key actor in the success story of the Languedocian broadcloth production specially devised for export to the Levant. Even non-specialists may be interested in understanding the clever management and technical organisation that made it possible for the author to produce, dye, finish, pack and export up to 1,375 pieces of superfine broadcloth per year, representing nearly 51 km of cloth.

Dyes in History and Archaeology 16/17

Author: Jo Kirby

Publisher: Archetype Publications

ISBN: 9781873132975

Category: Art

Page: 222

View: 9517

Interest in all aspects of dyestuffs has grown considerably since an informal meeting of researchers twenty years ago developed into the annual forum of Dyes in History and Archaeology. Collections of papers from the meetings, including this one, have been published under the same name. Analysis has revealed that the early 20th century clothing and textile designer, Mariano Fortuny, used natural dyes for his glorious silks and cottons. Natural indigo is still used in some parts of the world, but dyeing with it is harder, less pleasant work than is popularly supposed. Species of Coleus - one of which is the flame nettle, a popular houseplant in the West - are used as sources of red, blue, purple and green dyes in Papua New Guinea and other parts of Asia. Research into the history of dyestuffs covers many disciplines. Their chemistry is especially of fundamental interest: the development of synthetic dyes was a breakthrough for chemical technology and industrial processes. Analysis has enabled the identification of historical textiles dyestuffs and paintings pigments.

Colour

Making and Using Dyes and Pigments

Author: François Delamare,Bernard Guineau

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780500301029

Category: Color

Page: 159

View: 7848

Colour is all around us; we take it for granted as a naturally occurring element of all things. Yet colours are also manufactured, and the science of pigments, hues and dyes has an ancient and fascinating history. This book surveys the story of dyes and pigments, the invention of new colours and the industries that were fuelled by them. What were the colours of ancient Egypt? What did its artists use to paint their magnificent frescoes? Where do indigo and ochre come from? Why is purple the colour of royalty? What are pastels? How many colours are there? Why do we dye our food? Who invented ink? What is the symbolism of yellow? From cerise to crimson, from puce to periwinkle, this book is as rich, varied and delightful as a box of crayons.

Vegetable Dyes

Being a Book of Recipes and Other Information Useful to the Dyer

Author: Ethel M. Mairet

Publisher: Createspace Independent Pub

ISBN: 9781482745047

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 104

View: 2136

Vegetable Dyes: Being a book of Recipes and other information useful to the Dyer by Ethel M. Mairet. Natural dyes are dyes or colorants derived from plants, invertebrates, or minerals. The majority of natural dyes are vegetable dyes from plant sources -roots, berries, bark, leaves, and wood - and other organic sources such as fungi and lichens. Archaeologists have found evidence of textile dyeing dating back to the Neolithic period. In China, dyeing with plants, barks and insects has been traced back more than 5,000 years. The essential process of dyeing changed little over time. Typically, the dye material is put in a pot of water and then the textiles to be dyed are added to the pot, which is heated and stirred until the color is transferred. Textile fiber may be dyed before spinning ("dyed in the wool"), but most textiles are "yarn-dyed" or "piece-dyed" after weaving. Many natural dyes require the use of chemicals called mordants to bind the dye to the textile fibers; tannin from oak galls, salt, natural alum, vinegar, and ammonia from stale urine were used by early dyers. Many mordants, and some dyes themselves, produce strong odors, and large-scale dyeworks were often isolated in their own districts. Throughout history, people have dyed their textiles using common, locally available materials, but scarce dyestuffs that produced brilliant and permanent colors such as the natural invertebrate dyes, Tyrian purple and crimson kermes, became highly prized luxury items in the ancient and medieval world. Plant-based dyes such as woad (Isatis tinctoria), indigo, saffron, and madder were raised commercially and were important trade goods in the economies of Asia and Europe. Across Asia and Africa, patterned fabrics were produced using resist dyeing techniques to control the absorption of color in piece-dyed cloth. such as cochineal and logwood (Haematoxylum campechianum) were brought to Europe by the Spanish treasure fleets, and the dyestuffs of Europe were carried by colonists to America.

The Materiality of Color

The Production, Circulation, and Application of Dyes and Pigments, 1400-1800

Author: Andrea Feeser,Maureen Daly Goggin,Beth Fowkes Tobin

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9781409429159

Category: Art

Page: 333

View: 9822

The purpose of this essay collection is to recover color's complex and sometimes morally troubling past. By emphasising color's materiality, and how it was produced, exchanged and used, contributors draw attention to the disjuncture between the beauty of color and the blood, sweat, and tears that went into its production, circulation and application as well as to the complicated and varied social meanings attached to color within specific historical and social contexts.

Handbook of Natural Colorants

Author: Thomas Bechtold,Rita Mussak

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780470744963

Category: Science

Page: 434

View: 4746

Concentration on renewable resources, sustainability and replacement of oil based products are driving forces to reassess the potential of natural resources including natural colorants. The growing consumer interest in purchasing “green” products, which exhibit an improved environmental profile, can be seen as the break-through force needed to reintroduce natural colorants into the modern markets. Written by scientists with specialised knowledge in the field, Handbook of Natural Colorants provides a unique source of information, summarising the present knowledge of natural colorants in depth. Supporting researchers in this emerging field of sustainable chemistry, it provides easy access to the theory and practice of natural colorants from different viewpoints, including agricultural, economic and legislative aspects. Topics covered include: History of coloration technology Present position of natural colorants Regional plant source availability Specific application techniques Chemical properties that professional dyers and chemists have to consider Agricultural sourcing of dyes with an emphasis on renewable resources Discussions on energy and material balance issues arising from the sourcing of materials Production aspects of colorants, leading on to the key applications Environmental and economic aspects Also included are the pros and cons of natural dyestuffs, presenting some promising results and evaluating the potential use of vegetable dyes as alternatives to chemical-based ones with a focus on green chemistry

Natural Dyes

Aurantinidin, Betalain, Chica (Dye), Crimson, Curcumin, Haematoxylin, Juglone, Lawsone, Morindone, Mushroom Dye, Natural Dye, Orcein, Ph

Author: Source Wikipedia

Publisher: University-Press.org

ISBN: 9781230623269

Category:

Page: 40

View: 9306

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 22. Chapters: Aurantinidin, Betalain, Chica (dye), Crimson, Curcumin, Haematoxylin, Juglone, Lawsone, Morindone, Mushroom dye, Natural dye, Orcein, Phaeolus schweinitzii, Stil de grain yellow, Traditional dyes of the Scottish Highlands. Excerpt: Natural dyes are dyes or colorants derived from plants, invertebrates, or minerals. The majority of natural dyes are vegetable dyes from plant sources -roots, berries, bark, leaves, and wood - and other organic sources such as fungi and lichens. Archaeologists have found evidence of textile dyeing dating back to the Neolithic period. In China, dyeing with plants, barks and insects has been traced back more than 5,000 years. The essential process of dyeing changed little over time. Typically, the dye material is put in a pot of water and then the textiles to be dyed are added to the pot, which is heated and stirred until the color is transferred. Textile fiber may be dyed before spinning ("dyed in the wool"), but most textiles are "yarn-dyed" or "piece-dyed" after weaving. Many natural dyes require the use of chemicals called mordants to bind the dye to the textile fibers; tannin from oak galls, salt, natural alum, vinegar, and ammonia from stale urine were used by early dyers. Many mordants, and some dyes themselves, produce strong odors, and large-scale dyeworks were often isolated in their own districts. Throughout history, people have dyed their textiles using common, locally available materials, but scarce dyestuffs that produced brilliant and permanent colors such as the natural invertebrate dyes, Tyrian purple and crimson kermes, became highly prized luxury items in the ancient and medieval world. Plant-based dyes such as woad (Isatis tinctoria), indigo, saffron, and madder were raised commercially and were important trade goods in the economies of Asia and Europe. Across Asia...

Ancient Textiles

Production, Crafts and Society

Author: Marie-Louise Nosch,C. Gillis

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 1782974393

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 9451

An understanding of textiles and the role they played in the past is important for anyone interested in past societies. Textiles served and in fact still do as both functional and symbolic items. The evidence for ancient textiles in Europe is split quite definitely along a north-south divide, with an abundance of actual examples in the north, but precious little in the south, where indirect evidence comes from such things as vase painting and frescoes. This volume brings together these two schools to look in more detail at textiles in the ancient world, and is based on a conference held in Denmark and Sweden in March 2003. Section one, Production and Organisation takes a chronological look through more than four thousand years of history; from Syria in the mid-third millennium BC, to Seventeenth Century Germany. Section two, Crafts and Technology focuses on the relationship between the primary producer (the craftsman) and the secondary receiver (the archaeologist/conservator). The third section, Society, examines the symbolic nature of textiles, and their place within ancient societal groups. Throughout the book emphasis is placed on the universality of textiles, and the importance of information exchange between scholars from different disciplines. A small book on finds First Aid for the Excavation of Archaeological Textiles is included as an Appendix.