Baltimore's Alley Houses

Homes for Working People Since the 1780s

Author: Mary Ellen Hayward

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Architecture

Page: 307

View: 6179

This pioneering study explains how one of America’s important early cities responded to the challenge of housing its poorer citizens. Where and how did the working poor live? How did builders and developers provide reasonably priced housing for lower-income groups during the city's growth? Having studied over 3,000 surviving alley houses in Baltimore through extensive land records and census research, Mary Ellen Hayward systematically reconstructs the lives, households, and neighborhoods that once thrived on the city's narrowest streets. In the past, these neighborhoods were sometimes referred to as "dilapidated," "blighted," or "poverty stricken." In Baltimore's Alley Houses, Hayward reveals the rich cultural and ethnic traditions that formed the African-American and immigrant Irish, German, Bohemian, and Polish communities that made their homes on the city's alley streets. Featuring more than one hundred historic images, Baltimore's Alley Houses documents the changing architectural styles of low-income housing over two centuries and reveals the complex lives of its residents.

The Baltimore Rowhouse

Author: Mary Ellen Hayward,Charles Belfoure

Publisher: Princeton Architectural Press

ISBN: 9781568982830

Category: Architecture

Page: 288

View: 5954

Perhaps no other American city is so defined by an indigenous architectural style as Baltimore is by the rowhouse, whose brick facades march up and down the gentle hills of the city. Why did the rowhouse thrive in Baltimore? How did it escape destruction here, unlike in many other historic American cities? What were the forces that led to the citywide renovation of Baltimore's rowhouses? The Baltimore Rowhouse is the fascinating 200-year story of this building type. It chronicles the evolution of the rowhouse from its origins as speculative housing for immigrants, through its reclamation and renovation by young urban pioneers thanks to local government sponsorship, to its current occupation by a new cadre of wealthy professionals. The Baltimore Rowhouse was winner of the 2000 Maryland Historical Trust Heritage Book Award for outstanding books of scholarly or general interest.

Everyday Architecture of the Mid-Atlantic

Looking at Buildings and Landscapes

Author: Gabrielle M. Lanier,Bernard L. Herman,Center for American Places

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801853258

Category: Architecture

Page: 407

View: 1403

From the eighteenth-century single-room "mansions" of Delaware's Cypress Swamp district to the early twentieth-century suburban housing around Philadelphia and Wilmington, the architectural landscape of the mid-Atlantic region is both rich and varied. In this pioneering field guide to the region's historic vernacular architecture, Gabrielle Lanier and Bernard Herman describe the remarkably diverse building traditions that have overlapped and influenced one another for generations. With more than 300 illustrations and photographs, Everyday Architecture of the Mid-Atlantic explores the character of pre-1940 domestic and agricultural buildings in the towns and rural landscapes of southern New Jersey, Delaware, and coastal Maryland and Virginia. Approaching their subject "archaeologically," the authors examine the "layers" of a structure's past to show how it has changed over time and to reveal telling details about its occupants and the community in which they lived. The book provides architectural information as well as a working methodology for anyone wanting to explore and learn from traditional architecture and landscapes. The authors conclude that, as a vital cultural artifact, the distinctive architecture of the mid-Atlantic needs to be identified, recorded, and preserved. Everyday Architecture of the Mid-Atlantic gives proof to the insights architecture offers into who we are culturally as a community, a region, and a nation.

A History of the Salley Family, 1690-1965

Author: Olin Jones Salley

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 136563079X

Category: History

Page: 349

View: 1774

Henry Salley (1690-1765) married Mariah Von Arx, and immigrated in 1735 from Switzerland to Orangeburg County, South Carolina. Descendants lived in South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Kentucky, New Jersey, Georgia, Louisiana and elsewhere.

The Architecture of Baltimore

An Illustrated History

Author: Mary Ellen Hayward,Frank R. Shivers, Jr.

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801878060

Category: Architecture

Page: 397

View: 5655

The eclectic and inspiring architecture of Baltimore is captured in this study that ranges from the city's eighteenth-century Georgian buildings to its Romantic stylings, including Greek and Gothic revivals, and the influx of industrial buildings and modernist structures.

Swing

Author: Kwame Alexander,Mary Rand Hess

Publisher: Blink

ISBN: 0310761875

Category: Young Adult Fiction

Page: 448

View: 9786

New York Times bestselling authors Kwame Alexander and Mary Rand Hess (Solo) tell a lyrical story about hope, courage, and love that will speak to anyone who’s struggled to find their voice. And the surprise ending shines a spotlight on the issues related to our current social divide, challenging perspectives and inspiring everyone to make their voice heard. When America is not so beautiful, or right, or just, it can be hard to know what to do. Best friends Walt and Noah decide to use their voices to grow more good in the world, but first they’ve got to find cool. Walt is convinced junior year is their year, and he has a plan to help them woo the girls of their dreams and become amazing athletes. Never mind that he and Noah failed to make the high school baseball team yet again, and Noah’s love interest since third grade, Sam, has him firmly in the friend zone. Noah soon finds himself navigating the worlds of jazz, batting cages, the strange advice of Walt’s Dairy Queen-employed cousin, as well as Walt’s “Hug Life” mentality. Status quo seems inevitable until Noah stumbles on a stash of old love letters. Each page contains the words he’s always wanted to say to Sam, and he begins secretly creating artwork using the lines that speak his heart. But when his private artwork becomes public, Noah has a decision to make: continue his life in the dugout and possibly lose the girl forever, or take a swing and finally speak out? At the same time, numerous American flags are being left around town. While some think it’s a harmless prank and others see it as a form of peaceful protest, Noah can’t shake the feeling something bigger is happening to his community. Especially after he witnesses events that hint divides and prejudices run deeper than he realized. As the personal and social tensions increase around them, Noah and Walt must decide what is really true when it comes to love, friendship, sacrifice, and fate.

Neighborhood Upgrading

A Realistic Assessment

Author: David P. Varady

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780887063008

Category: Political Science

Page: 184

View: 4129

Neighborhood Upgrading examines the effectiveness of government-subsidized housing rehabilitation programs in reversing patterns of neighborhood decline. Varady takes a realistic look at the dilemma facing policy planners attempting to effect changes on a local level. His is the first study to assess the impact of neighborhood ethnic and social class changes on mobility and investment decisions. There has been little empirical research on neighborhood upgrading where improvement results from the efforts of existing residents aides by government assistance. Varady’ study makes a major contribution in illuminating the variables of this process. Focusing on the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Urban Homesteading Demonstration (UHD), he presents disturbing findings that are applicable to other neighborhood preservation programs such as the Neighborhood Housing Service (NHS) and the Community Development Block Grant Program. He argues that the future success of such programs lies in the ability of planners and policy makers to develop and implement policies addressing the issues that cause neighborhood decline—poverty, crime, and discrimination.

Flickering Treasures

Rediscovering Baltimore's Forgotten Movie Theaters

Author: Amy Davis

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421422190

Category: Architecture

Page: 320

View: 1819

Baltimore has been home to hundreds of theaters since the first moving pictures flickered across muslin sheets. These monuments to popular culture, adorned with grandiose architectural flourishes, seemed an everlasting part of Baltimore's landscape. By 1950, when the city's population peaked, Baltimore's movie fans could choose from among 119 theaters. But by 2016, the number of cinemas had dwindled to only three. Today, many of the city's theaters are boarded up, even burned out, while others hang on with varying degrees of dignity as churches or stores. In Flickering Treasures, Amy Davis, an award-winning photojournalist for the Baltimore Sun, pairs vintage black-and-white images of opulent downtown movie palaces and modest neighborhood theaters with her own contemporary full-color photographs, inviting us to imagine Charm City's past as we confront today's neglected urban landscape. Punctuated by engaging stories and interviews with local moviegoers, theater owners, ushers, and cashiers, plus commentary from celebrated Baltimore filmmakers Barry Levinson and John Waters, the book brings each theater and decade vividly to life. From Electric Park, the Century, and the Hippodrome to the Royal, the Parkway, the Senator, and scores of other beloved venues, the book delves into Baltimore's history, including its troubling legacy of racial segregation. The descriptions of the technological and cultural changes that have shaped both American cities and the business of movie exhibition will trigger affectionate memories for many readers. A map and timeline reveal the one-time presence of movie houses in every corner of the city, and fact boxes include the years of operation, address, architect, and seating capacity for each of the 72 theaters profiled, along with a brief description of each theater's distinct character. Highlighting the emotional resonance of film and the loyalty of Baltimoreans to their neighborhoods, Flickering Treasures is a profound story of change, loss, and rebirth.

Charm City

A Walk Through Baltimore

Author: Madison Smartt Bell

Publisher: Crown

ISBN: 030740742X

Category: Travel

Page: 240

View: 1841

With a writer’s keen eye, a longtime resident’s familiarity, and his own sly wit, acclaimed novelist Madison Smartt Bell leads us on a walk through his adopted hometown of Baltimore, a city where crab cakes, Edgar Allan Poe, hair extensions, and John Waters movies somehow coexist. From its founding before the Revolutionary War to its place in popular culture—thanks to seminal films like Barry Levinson’s Diner, the television show Homicide, and bestselling books by George Pelecanos and Laura Lippman—Baltimore is America, and in Charm City, Bell brings its story to vivid life. First revealing how Baltimore received some of its nicknames—including “Charm City”—Bell sets off from his neighborhood of Cedarcroft and finds his way across the city’s crossroads, joined periodically by a host of fellow Baltimoreans. Exploring Baltimore’s prominent role in history (it was here that Washington planned the battle of Yorktown and Francis Scott Key witnessed the “bombs bursting in air”), Bell takes us to such notable spots as the Inner Harbor and Federal Hill, as well as many of the undiscovered corners that give Baltimore its distinctive character. All the while, Charm City sheds deserved light onto a sometimes overlooked, occasionally eccentric, but always charming place. From the Hardcover edition.

Cities and buildings

skyscrapers, skid rows, and suburbs

Author: Larry Ford

Publisher: Johns Hopkins Univ Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: Architecture

Page: 304

View: 706

Freedom's Port

The African American Community of Baltimore, 1790-1860

Author: Christopher Phillips

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252066184

Category: History

Page: 350

View: 8309

Baltimore Graffiti

The Definitive Charm City Style Collection

Author: Michael Sachse

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780764351549

Category:

Page: 208

View: 7306

This photo-documentary of Baltimore graffiti writers' tags, or specially styled signatures, features the widest range of such artwork ever compiled. In one of the most staggering local graffiti compendiums available, photos taken between 2011 and 2014 highlight the myriad variations of tags and throw-ups the most active Baltimore graffiti artists have produced. Discover what makes Maryland's largest city stand apart from other graffiti communities by having a close look at 126 artist collages and over 4,000 images total. Four years' worth of blood, sweat, and tears went into amassing a complete spectrum of Charm City's graffiti writers in active hotspots, reaching beyond the city's borders into Baltimore County. Experience this urban landscape as many graffiti artists have through collages crammed with as many as 40 or more tag examples, as well as some rare views of the decaying underbelly of the Baltimore area.

Hampden-Woodberry

Author: Mark Chalkley

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1439617449

Category: Photography

Page: 128

View: 1896

The urban Baltimore neighborhood of Hampden-Woodberry began as a mill village in rural Baltimore County, where the swift-flowing waters of Jones Falls provided the power for early gristmills. As the nearby city grew into a major international port, the flour mills gave way to cloth mills that turned out cotton duck for sails. At their peak, the mills of Hampden-Woodberry turned out 80 percent of the world's cotton duck. Thousands of men, women, and children were employed in what was, in the late 19th century, the United States' largest concentration of factory labor. Fortunes were made by such men as Robert Poole and the Hooper, Carroll, and Gambrill families, who owned the mills. When it was annexed to Baltimore in 1888, Hampden-Woodberry was a thriving industrial community. The last of the mills closed in 1972, but many of these historic structures are now being reused for a variety of purposes. More importantly, Hampden-Woodberry still survives as a community with deep roots in America's industrial past.

Homicide

A Year on the Killing Streets

Author: David Simon

Publisher: Holt Paperbacks

ISBN: 9781429900959

Category: True Crime

Page: 672

View: 3246

From the creator of HBO's The Wire, the classic book about homicide investigation that became the basis for the hit television show The scene is Baltimore. Twice every three days another citizen is shot, stabbed, or bludgeoned to death. At the center of this hurricane of crime is the city's homicide unit, a small brotherhood of hard men who fight for whatever justice is possible in a deadly world. David Simon was the first reporter ever to gain unlimited access to a homicide unit, and this electrifying book tells the true story of a year on the violent streets of an American city. The narrative follows Donald Worden, a veteran investigator; Harry Edgerton, a black detective in a mostly white unit; and Tom Pellegrini, an earnest rookie who takes on the year's most difficult case, the brutal rape and murder of an eleven-year-old girl. Originally published fifteen years ago, Homicide became the basis for the acclaimed television show of the same name. This new edition—which includes a new introduction, an afterword, and photographs—revives this classic, riveting tale about the men who work on the dark side of the American experience.

The Politics of Public Housing

Black Women's Struggles against Urban Inequality

Author: Rhonda Y. Williams

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198036036

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 3856

Black women have traditionally represented the canvas on which many debates about poverty and welfare have been drawn. For a quarter century after the publication of the notorious Moynihan report, poor black women were tarred with the same brush: "ghetto moms" or "welfare queens" living off the state, with little ambition or hope of an independent future. At the same time, the history of the civil rights movement has all too often succumbed to an idolatry that stresses the centrality of prominent leaders while overlooking those who fought daily for their survival in an often hostile urban landscape. In this collective biography, Rhonda Y. Williams takes us behind, and beyond, politically expedient labels to provide an incisive and intimate portrait of poor black women in urban America. Drawing on dozens of interviews, Williams challenges the notion that low-income housing was a resounding failure that doomed three consecutive generations of post-war Americans to entrenched poverty. Instead, she recovers a history of grass-roots activism, of political awakening, and of class mobility, all facilitated by the creation of affordable public housing. The stereotyping of black women, especially mothers, has obscured a complicated and nuanced reality too often warped by the political agendas of both the left and the right, and has prevented an accurate understanding of the successes and failures of government anti-poverty policy. At long last giving human form to a community of women who have too often been treated as faceless pawns in policy debates, Rhonda Y. Williams offers an unusually balanced and personal account of the urban war on poverty from the perspective of those who fought, and lived, it daily.

Baltimore Neighborhoods

Author: Marsha Wight Wise

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1439619417

Category: Travel

Page: 128

View: 1608

Baltimore’s rich diversity is represented by its many neighborhoods—95 at last count. Some neighborhoods meander for several city blocks while others claim only a few. This volume of vintage postcards provides unique glimpses into the past of many of Baltimore’s neighborhoods. Included are the elegant homes of Roland Park, Guildford, and Sherwood Gardens; the workingman’s Highlandtown, South Baltimore, and Locust Point; the streetcar suburbs of Mount Washington, Overlea, Ten Hills, and Hunting Ridge; and the city park–anchored communities of Patterson Park, Federal Hill, and Gwynns Falls. Readers will find no two communities alike.

Paradise Alley

Author: Kevin Baker

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0061748986

Category: Fiction

Page: 704

View: 5067

They came by boat from a starving land—and by the Underground Railroad from Southern chains—seeking refuge in a crowded, filthy corner of hell at the bottom of a great metropolis. But in the terrible July of 1863, the poor and desperate of Paradise Alley would face a new catastrophe—as flames from the war that was tearing America in two reached out to set their city on fire.

Not in My Neighborhood

How Bigotry Shaped a Great American City

Author: N.A

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781566639002

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 7126