The Baltimore Rowhouse

Author: Mary Ellen Hayward,Charles Belfoure

Publisher: Princeton Architectural Press

ISBN: 9781568982830

Category: Architecture

Page: 288

View: 1306

Perhaps no other American city is so defined by an indigenous architectural style as Baltimore is by the rowhouse, whose brick facades march up and down the gentle hills of the city. Why did the rowhouse thrive in Baltimore? How did it escape destruction here, unlike in many other historic American cities? What were the forces that led to the citywide renovation of Baltimore's rowhouses? The Baltimore Rowhouse is the fascinating 200-year story of this building type. It chronicles the evolution of the rowhouse from its origins as speculative housing for immigrants, through its reclamation and renovation by young urban pioneers thanks to local government sponsorship, to its current occupation by a new cadre of wealthy professionals. The Baltimore Rowhouse was winner of the 2000 Maryland Historical Trust Heritage Book Award for outstanding books of scholarly or general interest.

A History of the Salley Family, 1690-1965

Author: Olin Jones Salley

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 136563079X

Category: History

Page: 349

View: 8012

Henry Salley (1690-1765) married Mariah Von Arx, and immigrated in 1735 from Switzerland to Orangeburg County, South Carolina. Descendants lived in South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Kentucky, New Jersey, Georgia, Louisiana and elsewhere.

The Politics of Public Housing

Black Women's Struggles against Urban Inequality

Author: Rhonda Y. Williams

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198036036

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 7707

Black women have traditionally represented the canvas on which many debates about poverty and welfare have been drawn. For a quarter century after the publication of the notorious Moynihan report, poor black women were tarred with the same brush: "ghetto moms" or "welfare queens" living off the state, with little ambition or hope of an independent future. At the same time, the history of the civil rights movement has all too often succumbed to an idolatry that stresses the centrality of prominent leaders while overlooking those who fought daily for their survival in an often hostile urban landscape. In this collective biography, Rhonda Y. Williams takes us behind, and beyond, politically expedient labels to provide an incisive and intimate portrait of poor black women in urban America. Drawing on dozens of interviews, Williams challenges the notion that low-income housing was a resounding failure that doomed three consecutive generations of post-war Americans to entrenched poverty. Instead, she recovers a history of grass-roots activism, of political awakening, and of class mobility, all facilitated by the creation of affordable public housing. The stereotyping of black women, especially mothers, has obscured a complicated and nuanced reality too often warped by the political agendas of both the left and the right, and has prevented an accurate understanding of the successes and failures of government anti-poverty policy. At long last giving human form to a community of women who have too often been treated as faceless pawns in policy debates, Rhonda Y. Williams offers an unusually balanced and personal account of the urban war on poverty from the perspective of those who fought, and lived, it daily.

Maryland Law Reporter

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law reports, digests, etc

Page: N.A

View: 9009

The Huguenots in America

a refugee people in new world society

Author: Jon Butler

Publisher: Harvard Univ Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 8844

In this first modern history of the Huguenots' New World experience, Jon Butler traces the Huguenot diaspora across late seven-teenth-century Europe, explores the causes and character of their American emigration, and reveals the Huguenots' secular and religious assimilation in three remarkably different societies--Boston, New York, and South Carolina.

Ebony

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: African Americans

Page: N.A

View: 6126

Gettysburg--Culp's Hill and Cemetery Hill

Author: Harry W. Pfanz

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807869740

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 7519

In this companion to his celebrated earlier book, Gettysburg--The Second Day, Harry Pfanz provides the first definitive account of the fighting between the Army of the Potomac and Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia at Cemetery Hill and Culp's Hill--two of the most critical engagements fought at Gettysburg on 2 and 3 July 1863. Pfanz provides detailed tactical accounts of each stage of the contest and explores the interactions between--and decisions made by--generals on both sides. In particular, he illuminates Confederate lieutenant general Richard S. Ewell's controversial decision not to attack Cemetery Hill after the initial southern victory on 1 July. Pfanz also explores other salient features of the fighting, including the Confederate occupation of the town of Gettysburg, the skirmishing in the south end of town and in front of the hills, the use of breastworks on Culp's Hill, and the small but decisive fight between Union cavalry and the Stonewall Brigade.

Homicide

Ein Jahr auf mörderischen Straßen

Author: David Simon

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783453676350

Category:

Page: 828

View: 4685

Editor & Publisher

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Journalism

Page: N.A

View: 3978

Special features, such as syndicate directories, annual newspaper linage tabulations, etc., appear as separately paged sections of regular issues.

Racism in the Nation's Service

Government Workers and the Color Line in Woodrow Wilson's America

Author: Eric S. Yellin

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469607212

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 7605

Between the 1880s and 1910s, thousands of African Americans passed civil service exams and became employed in the executive offices of the federal government. However, by 1920, promotions to well-paying federal jobs had nearly vanished for black workers. Eric S. Yellin argues that the Wilson administration's successful 1913 drive to segregate the federal government was a pivotal episode in the age of progressive politics. Yellin investigates how the enactment of this policy, based on Progressives' demands for whiteness in government, imposed a color line on American opportunity and implicated Washington in the economic limitation of African Americans for decades to come. Using vivid accounts of the struggles and protests of African American government employees, Yellin reveals the racism at the heart of the era's reform politics. He illuminates the nineteenth-century world of black professional labor and social mobility in Washington, D.C., and uncovers the Wilson administration's progressive justifications for unraveling that world. From the hopeful days following emancipation to the white-supremacist "normalcy" of the 1920s, Yellin traces the competing political ideas, politicians, and ordinary government workers who created "federal segregation."

Historic Amusement Parks of Baltimore

An Illustrated History

Author: John P. Coleman

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 1476616485

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 252

View: 5287

This book presents the rich history of the old amusement parks and beach resorts frequented by Baltimoreans beginning in the 1870s and stretching into the late 20th century. Readers may recognize such popular amusement parks as Gwynn Oak, Carlin’s, and Tolchester Beach, and will learn about some of the more obscure places like Frederick Road Park and Hollywood Park. Each of the major parks is documented here, complete with a detailed history of the sites they were built on, the creative owners behind the parks’ inceptions, the individuals and companies who provided the rides and attractions, and, the people that happily traveled by boat, streetcar, train and automobile to reach their favorite park or resort.