Black Baltimore

A New Theory of Community

Author: Harold Mcdougall

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 1566391938

Category: History

Page: 334

View: 6725

Through extensive neighborhood interviews and a compelling assessment of the problems of unraveling communities in urban America, Harold McDougall reveals how, in sections of Baltimore, a "New Community" is developing. Relying more on vernacular culture, personal networking, and mutual support than on private wealth or public subsidy, the communities of black Baltimore provide an example of self-help and civic action that could and should be occurring in other inner-city areas. In this political history of Old West Baltimore, McDougall describes how "base communities"—small peer groups that share similar views, circumstances, and objectives—have helped neighborhoods respond to the failure of both government and the market to create conditions for a decent quality of life for all. Arguing for the primacy of church leadership within the black community, the author describes how these small, flexible groups are creating the foundation of what he calls a New Community, where community-spirited organizers, clergy, public interest advocates, business people, and government workers interact and build relationships through which Baltimore's urban agenda is being developed.

The Black Book: Reflections From the Baltimore Grassroots

Author: Dayvon Love,Lawrence Grandpre

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 1312512474

Category: Reference

Page: 246

View: 8732

The Black Book: Reflections from the Baltimore grassroots, is a collection of essays that describe important issues that face grassroots activist and organizers in Baltimore. We hope that those who are genuinely interested in advancing racial justice in our society will use this resource to guide your thinking and action around issues of justice.

Black Baltimore, 1820-1870

Author: Ralph Clayton

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 199

View: 7205

The Effect of Immigration on the Negro in Baltimore 1850-1860 describes the effects of predominantly non-Black immigration into the city on the lives of the free and slave Blacks before the Civil War. Slaveholders of Baltimore, 1860 discusses the social history of the slaves, and provides a listing of all slaveholders enumerated in the 1860 Federal Census. Slaves by Name. Notices of runaway slaves were routinely published in the newspapers and now provide an important resource for family historians. This article provides an index to such notices in the Baltimore Sun for the years 1837-1864. Baltimore Free Black Households with Slaves, 1820-1840. In a city like Baltimore not all slaves were required to live on the premises of their master, and they frequently appear in the households of other Blacks who often were friends or relations. In addition, a surprising number of free Blacks were themselves slave holders. Black Families of East Baltimore, 1870. This first census after Emancipation is the first to identify all Blacks by name, age, birthplace, etc. and is of great value to family historians and sociologists. This article provides a listing of every Black in Wards 1 to 6 of East Baltimore. Laurel Cemetery, 1852-1958 gives a brief history of the cemetery and a partial reconstruction of interments there.

The Baltimore Afro-American, 1892-1950

Author: Hayward Farrar

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313305177

Category: History

Page: 220

View: 2521

Examines the Baltimore Afro-American from its founding in 1892 to the dawn of the Civil Rights Era in 1950.

Baltimore

A Political History

Author: Matthew A. Crenson

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421422077

Category: History

Page: 632

View: 3966

Charm City or Mobtown? People from Baltimore glory in its eccentric charm, small-town character, and North-cum-South culture. But for much of the nineteenth century, violence and disorder plagued the city. More recently, the 2015 death of Freddie Gray in police custody has prompted Baltimoreans—and the entire nation—to focus critically on the rich and tangled narrative of black–white relations in Baltimore, where slavery once existed alongside the largest community of free blacks in the United States. Matthew A. Crenson, a distinguished political scientist and Baltimore native, examines the role of politics and race throughout Baltimore’s history. From its founding in 1729 up through the recent past, Crenson follows Baltimore’s political evolution from an empty expanse of marsh and hills to a complicated city with distinct ways of doing business. Revealing how residents at large engage (and disengage) with one another across an expansive agenda of issues and conflicts, Crenson shows how politics helped form this complex city’s personality. Crenson provocatively argues that Baltimore’s many quirks are likely symptoms of urban underdevelopment. The city’s longtime domination by the general assembly—and the corresponding weakness of its municipal authority—forced residents to adopt the private and extra-governmental institutions that shaped early Baltimore. On the one hand, Baltimore was resolutely parochial, split by curious political quarrels over issues as minor as loose pigs. On the other, it was keenly attuned to national politics: during the Revolution, for instance, Baltimoreans were known for their comparative radicalism. Crenson describes how, as Baltimore and the nation grew, whites competed with blacks, slave and free, for menial and low-skill work. He also explores how the urban elite thrived by avoiding, wherever possible, questions of slavery vs. freedom—just as, long after the Civil War and emancipation, wealthier Baltimoreans preferred to sidestep racial controversy. Peering into the city’s 300-odd neighborhoods, this fascinating account holds up a mirror to Baltimore, asking whites in particular to re-examine the past and accept due responsibility for future racial progress.

"Brown" in Baltimore

School Desegregation and the Limits of Liberalism

Author: Howell S. Baum

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801457106

Category: Education

Page: N.A

View: 2338

In the first book to present the history of Baltimore school desegregation, Howell S. Baum shows how good intentions got stuck on what Gunnar Myrdal called the "American Dilemma." Immediately after the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision, the city's liberal school board voted to desegregate and adopted a free choice policy that made integration voluntary. Baltimore's school desegregation proceeded peacefully, without the resistance or violence that occurred elsewhere. However, few whites chose to attend school with blacks, and after a few years of modest desegregation, schools resegregated and became increasingly segregated. The school board never changed its policy. Black leaders had urged the board to adopt free choice and, despite the limited desegregation, continued to support the policy and never sued the board to do anything else. Baum finds that American liberalism is the key to explaining how this happened. Myrdal observed that many whites believed in equality in the abstract but considered blacks inferior and treated them unequally. School officials were classical liberals who saw the world in terms of individuals, not races. They adopted a desegregation policy that explicitly ignored students' race and asserted that all students were equal in freedom to choose schools, while their policy let whites who disliked blacks avoid integration. School officials' liberal thinking hindered them from understanding or talking about the city's history of racial segregation, continuing barriers to desegregation, and realistic change strategies. From the classroom to city hall, Baum examines how Baltimore's distinct identity as a border city between North and South shaped local conversations about the national conflict over race and equality. The city's history of wrestling with the legacy of Brown reveals Americans' preferred way of dealing with racial issues: not talking about race. This avoidance, Baum concludes, allows segregation to continue.

Small Town Baltimore

An Album of Memories

Author: Gilbert Sandler

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801870699

Category: History

Page: 226

View: 2450

"This "album of memories" introduces the reader to the people and places - neighborhoods, restaurants, department stores, parks, hotels, night clubs, racetracks, and theaters - that once put the charm in Charm City."--BOOK JACKET.

The Baltimore Elite Giants

Sport and Society in the Age of Negro League Baseball

Author: Bob Luke

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 0801891167

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 6944

One of the best-known teams in the old Negro Leagues, the Elite Giants of Baltimore featured some of the outstanding African American players of the day. Sociologist and baseball writer Bob Luke narrates the untold story of the team and its interaction with the city and its people during the long years of segregation. To convey a sense of the action on the field and the major events in the team’s history, Luke highlights important games, relives the standout performances of individual players, and discusses key decisions made by management. He introduces the team’s eventual major league stars: Roy Campanella, who went on to a ten-year Hall of Fame career with the Brooklyn Dodgers; Joe Black, the first African American pitcher to win a World Series game; and James "Junior" Gilliam, a player and coach with the Dodgers for twenty-five years. Luke also describes the often contentious relationship between the team and major league baseball before, during, and after the major leagues were integrated. The Elite Giants did more than provide entertainment for Baltimore’s black residents; the team and its star players broke the color barrier in the major leagues, giving hope to an African American community still oppressed by Jim Crow. In recounting the history of the Elite Giants, Luke reveals how the team, its personalities, and its fans raised public awareness of the larger issues faced by blacks in segregation-era Baltimore. Based on interviews with former players and Baltimore residents, articles from the black press of the time, and archival documents, and illustrated with previously unpublished photographs, The Baltimore Elite Giants recounts a barrier-breaking team’s successes, failures, and eventual demise.

Freedom's Port

The African American Community of Baltimore, 1790-1860

Author: Christopher Phillips

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252066184

Category: History

Page: 350

View: 7385

Homicide

A Year on the Killing Streets

Author: David Simon

Publisher: Holt Paperbacks

ISBN: 9781429900959

Category: True Crime

Page: 672

View: 1013

From the creator of HBO's The Wire, the classic book about homicide investigation that became the basis for the hit television show The scene is Baltimore. Twice every three days another citizen is shot, stabbed, or bludgeoned to death. At the center of this hurricane of crime is the city's homicide unit, a small brotherhood of hard men who fight for whatever justice is possible in a deadly world. David Simon was the first reporter ever to gain unlimited access to a homicide unit, and this electrifying book tells the true story of a year on the violent streets of an American city. The narrative follows Donald Worden, a veteran investigator; Harry Edgerton, a black detective in a mostly white unit; and Tom Pellegrini, an earnest rookie who takes on the year's most difficult case, the brutal rape and murder of an eleven-year-old girl. Originally published fifteen years ago, Homicide became the basis for the acclaimed television show of the same name. This new edition—which includes a new introduction, an afterword, and photographs—revives this classic, riveting tale about the men who work on the dark side of the American experience.

Black Firsts

4,000 Ground-Breaking and Pioneering Historical Events

Author: Jessie Carney Smith

Publisher: Visible Ink Press

ISBN: 1578594251

Category: Social Science

Page: 848

View: 7252

Achievement engenders pride, and the most significant accomplishments involving people, places, and events in black history are gathered in Black Firsts: 4,000 Ground-Breaking and Pioneering Events.

Killing the Black Body

Race, Reproduction, and the Meaning of Liberty

Author: Dorothy Roberts

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0804152594

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 923

The image of the “Welfare Queen” still dominates white America’s perceptions of Black women. It is an image that also continues to shape our government’s policies concerning Black women’s reproductive decisions. Proposed legislation to alleviate poverty focuses on plans to deny benefits to children born to welfare mothers and to require insertion of birth control implants as a condition of receiving aid. Meanwhile a booming fertility industry serves primarily infertile white couples. In Killing the Black Body, Northwestern University professor Dorothy Roberts exposes America’s systemic abuse of Black women’s bodies, from slave masters’ economic stake in bonded women’s fertility to government programs that coerced thousands of poor Black women into being sterilized as late as the 1970s. These abuses, Roberts argues, point not only to the degradation of Black motherhood but to the exclusion of Black women’s reproductive needs from the feminist agenda. Groundbreaking, authoritative, and timely, Killing the Black Body is both a powerful legal argument and a valuable aid for teachers, activists, and policy makers in creating a vision of reproductive freedom that respects each and every American.

Journeys to the Heart of Baltimore

Author: Michael Olesker

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801867545

Category: History

Page: 346

View: 9410

In this text, veteran journalist Michael Olesker writes of the American melting pot - particularly Baltimore's - in all its rollicking, sentimental, good-natured and chaotic essence.

Born along the Color Line

The 1933 Amenia Conference and the Rise of a National Civil Rights Movement

Author: Eben Miller

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199913463

Category: Social Science

Page: 368

View: 7139

In August, 1933, dozens of people gathered amid seven large, canvas tents in a field near Amenia, in upstate New York. Joel Spingarn, president of the board of the NAACP, had called a conference to revitalize the flagging civil rights organization. In Amenia, such old lions as the 65 year-old W.E.B. DuBois would mingle with "the coming leaders of Negro thought." It was a fascinating encounter that would transform the civil rights movement. With elegant writing and piercing insight, historian Eben Miller narrates how this little-known conference brought together a remarkable young group of African American activists, capturing through the lives of five extraordinary participants--youth activist Juanita Jackson, diplomat Ralph Bunche, economist Abram Harris, lawyer Louis Redding, and Harlem organizer Moran Weston--how this generation shaped the ongoing movement for civil rights during the Depression, World War II, and beyond. Miller describes how Jackson, Bunche, Harris, and the others felt that, amidst the global crisis of the 1930s, it was urgent to move beyond the NAACP's legal and political focus to build an economic movement that reached across the racial divide to challenge the capitalist system that had collapsed so devastatingly. They advocated alliances with labor groups, agitated for equal education, and campaigned for anti-lynching legislation and open access to the ballot and employment--spreading their influential ideas through their writings and by mass organizing in African American communities across the country, North and South. In their arguments and individual awakenings, they formed a key bridge between the turn-of-the-century Talented Tenth and the postwar civil rights generation, broadening and advancing the fight for racial equality through the darkest economic times the country has ever faced. In Born along the Color Line, Miller vividly captures the emergence of a forgotten generation of African American leaders, a generation that made Brown v. Board of Education and all that followed from it possible. It is an illuminating portrait of the "long civil rights movement," not the movement that began in the 1950s, but the one that took on new life at Amenia in 1933

The Integration of Major League Baseball

A Team by Team History

Author: Rick Swaine

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786453346

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 279

View: 7116

This book is a record of the men and events, team by team, during Major League Baseball’s integration. It focuses especially on the owners, executives and managers who were the heroes, villains or spectators of integration, and it sheds new light on the unheralded champions of integration and on those whose culpability has so far been overlooked. Individual chapters cover each of baseball’s integration-era teams, and a final chapter covers expansion teams of the 1960s. Each team’s responsible individuals are examined, its acquisition, deployment and treatment of black players documented, and the effect of its integration actions on team performance analyzed. Appendices provide populations of integration-era Major League cities, first black players by team, first black players in various minor leagues, rosters of black players by team, a timeline of black player milestones, and a list of black All-Star selections through 1969.

Baltimore

Author: Philip J. Merrill

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1439610118

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 1808

Throughout the years, the city of Baltimore has played host to many well-known figures, including Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, and boxer Joe Louis; the city has been called home by Billie Holiday, Frederick Douglass, and Thurgood Marshall. But it is the local African-American community's members, working diligently to advance and empower themselves, who made history while they lived it.

The Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution

Author: Edward G. Gray,Jane Kamensky

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199324034

Category: History

Page: 696

View: 9016

The Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution draws on a wealth of new scholarship to create a vibrant dialogue among varied approaches to the revolution that made the United States. In thirty-three essays written by authorities on the period, the Handbook brings to life the diverse multitudes of colonial North America and their extraordinary struggles before, during, and after the eight-year-long civil war that secured the independence of thirteen rebel colonies from their erstwhile colonial parent. The chapters explore battles and diplomacy, economics and finance, law and culture, politics and society, gender, race, and religion. Its diverse cast of characters includes ordinary farmers and artisans, free and enslaved African Americans, Indians, and British and American statesmen and military leaders. In addition to expanding the Revolution's who, the Handbook broadens its where, portraying an event that far transcended the boundaries of what was to become the United States. It offers readers an American Revolution whose impact ranged far beyond the thirteen colonies. The Handbook's range of interpretive and methodological approaches captures the full scope of current revolutionary-era scholarship. Its authors, British and American scholars spanning several generations, include social, cultural, military, and imperial historians, as well as those who study politics, diplomacy, literature, gender, and sexuality. Together and separately, these essays demonstrate that the American Revolution remains a vibrant and inviting a subject of inquiry. Nothing comparable has been published in decades.

Maryland Wits and Baltimore Bards

A Literary History with Notes on Washington Writers

Author: Frank R. Shivers

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801858109

Category: History

Page: 343

View: 9989

In the first comprehensive literary history of Baltimore and Maryland, Frank R. Shivers, Jr., explores the region's long-overlooked but substantial contribution to American letters. In picture and story, Shivers's lively account ranges from the colonial satire of Ebenezer Cook to the national anthem of Francis Scott Key to the acclaimed works of Poe, Mencken, Fitzgerald, and more. 48 illustrations.