Blockbusting in Baltimore

The Edmondson Village Story

Author: W. Edward Orser

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813148316

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 3086

This innovative study of racial upheaval and urban transformation in Baltimore, Maryland investigates the impact of "blockbusting" -- a practice in which real estate agents would sell a house on an all-white block to an African American family with the aim of igniting a panic among the other residents. These homeowners would often sell at a loss to move away, and the real estate agents would promote the properties at a drastic markup to African American buyers. In this groundbreaking book, W. Edward Orser examines Edmondson Village, a west Baltimore rowhouse community where an especially acute instance of blockbusting triggered white flight and racial change on a dramatic scale. Between 1955 and 1965, nearly twenty thousand white residents, who saw their secure world changing drastically, were replaced by blacks in search of the American dream. By buying low and selling high, playing on the fears of whites and the needs of African Americans, blockbusters set off a series of events that Orser calls "a collective trauma whose significance for recent American social and cultural history is still insufficiently appreciated and understood." Blockbusting in Baltimore describes a widely experienced but little analyzed phenomenon of recent social history. Orser makes an important contribution to community and urban studies, race relations, and records of the African American experience.

Block by Block

Neighborhoods and Public Policy on Chicago's West Side

Author: Amanda I. Seligman

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226746658

Category: History

Page: 301

View: 4277

Looks at the effects of race on the neighborhood dynamics of Chicago's West Side from the end of World War II through the 1970s.

Behind the Backlash

White Working-Class Politics in Baltimore, 1940-1980

Author: Kenneth D. Durr

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807862371

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 7147

In this nuanced look at white working-class life and politics in twentieth-century America, Kenneth Durr takes readers into the neighborhoods, workplaces, and community institutions of blue-collar Baltimore in the decades after World War II. Challenging notions that the "white backlash" of the 1960s and 1970s was driven by increasing race resentment, Durr details the rise of a working-class populism shaped by mistrust of the means and ends of postwar liberalism in the face of urban decline. Exploring the effects of desegregation, deindustrialization, recession, and the rise of urban crime, Durr shows how legitimate economic, social, and political grievances convinced white working-class Baltimoreans that they were threatened more by the actions of liberal policymakers than by the incursions of urban blacks. While acknowledging the parochialism and racial exclusivity of white working-class life, Durr adopts an empathetic view of workers and their institutions. Behind the Backlash melds ethnic, labor, and political history to paint a rich portrait of urban life--and the sweeping social and economic changes that reshaped America's cities and politics in the late twentieth century.

But for Birmingham

The Local and National Movements in the Civil Rights Struggle

Author: Glenn T. Eskew

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807846674

Category: History

Page: 434

View: 1395

Historian Glenn Eskew describes the changing face of Birmingham's civil rights campaign, from the politics of accommodation practiced by the city's black bourgeoisie in the 1950s to local pastor Fred L. Shuttlesworth's groundbreaking use of nonviolent direct action to challenge segregation during the late 1950s and early 1960s. Maps, notes, bibliography, index. 25 illustrations.

Encyclopedia of Race, Ethnicity, and Society

Author: Richard T. Schaefer

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1412926947

Category: Social Science

Page: 1622

View: 3193

This three volume reference set offers a comprehensive look at the roles race and ethnicity play in society and in our daily lives. General readers, students, and scholars alike will appreciate the informative coverage of intergroup relations in the United States and the comparative examination of race and ethnicity worldwide. These volumes offer a foundation to understanding as well as researching racial and ethnic diversity from a multidisciplinary perspective. Over a hundred racial and ethnic groups are described, with additional thematic essays offering insight into broad topics that cut across group boundaries and which impact on society. The encyclopedia has alphabetically arranged author-signed essays with references to guide further reading. Numerous cross-references aid the reader to explore beyond specific entries, reflecting the interdependent nature of race and ethnicity operating in society. The text is supplemented by photographs, tables, figures and custom-designed maps to provide an engaging visual look at race and ethnicity. An easy-to-use statistical appendix offers the latest data with carefully selected historical comparisons to aid study and research in the area

Encyclopedia of Contemporary American Culture

Author: Robert Gregg,Gary W. McDonogh,Cindy H. Wong

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134719280

Category: Reference

Page: 880

View: 3814

As a meeting point for world cultures, the USA is characterized by its breadth and diversity. Acknowledging that diversity is the fundamental feature of American culture, this volume is organized around a keen awareness of race, gender, class and space and with over 1,200 alphabetically-arranged entries - spanning 'the American century' from the end of World War II to the present day - the Encyclopedia provides a one-stop source for insightful and stimulating coverage of all aspects of that culture. Entries range from short definitions to longer overview essays and with full cross-referencing, extensive indexing, and a thematic contents list, this volume provides an essential cultural context for both teachers and students of American studies, as well as providing fascinating insights into American culture for the general reader. The suggestions for further reading, which follows most entries, are also invaluable guides to more specialized sources.

Flickering Treasures

Rediscovering Baltimore's Forgotten Movie Theaters

Author: Amy Davis

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421422182

Category: Architecture

Page: 302

View: 7542

Baltimore has been home to hundreds of theaters since the first moving pictures flickered across muslin sheets. These monuments to popular culture, adorned with grandiose architectural flourishes, seemed an everlasting part of Baltimore’s landscape. By 1950, when the city’s population peaked, Baltimore’s movie fans could choose from among 119 theaters. But by 2016, the number of cinemas had dwindled to only three. Today, many of the city’s theaters are boarded up, even burned out, while others hang on with varying degrees of dignity as churches or stores. In Flickering Treasures, Amy Davis, an award-winning photojournalist for the Baltimore Sun, pairs vintage black-and-white images of opulent downtown movie palaces and modest neighborhood theaters with her own contemporary full-color photographs, inviting us to imagine Charm City’s past as we confront today’s neglected urban landscape. Punctuated by engaging stories and interviews with local moviegoers, theater owners, ushers, and cashiers, plus commentary from celebrated Baltimore filmmakers Barry Levinson and John Waters, the book brings each theater and decade vividly to life. From Electric Park, the Century, and the Hippodrome to the Royal, the Parkway, the Senator, and scores of other beloved venues, the book delves into Baltimore’s history, including its troubling legacy of racial segregation. The descriptions of the technological and cultural changes that have shaped both American cities and the business of movie exhibition will trigger affectionate memories for many readers. A map and timeline reveal the one-time presence of movie houses in every corner of the city, and fact boxes include the years of operation, address, architect, and seating capacity for each of the 72 theaters profiled, along with a brief description of each theater’s distinct character. Highlighting the emotional resonance of film and the loyalty of Baltimoreans to their neighborhoods, Flickering Treasures is a profound story of change, loss, and rebirth. -- W. Edward Orser, author of Blockbusting in Baltimore: The Edmondson Village Story

The New American Suburb

Poverty, Race and the Economic Crisis

Author: Katrin B. Anacker

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1472401808

Category: Political Science

Page: 310

View: 7182

The majority of Americans live in suburbs and until about a decade or so ago, most suburbs had been assumed to be non-Hispanic White, affluent, and without problems. However, recent data have shown that there are changing trends among U.S. suburbs. This book provides timely analyses of current suburban issues by utilizing recently published data from the 2010 Census and American Community Survey to address key themes including suburban poverty; racial and ethnic change and suburban decline; suburban foreclosures; and suburban policy.

How Racism Takes Place

Author: George Lipsitz

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 1439902577

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 310

View: 956

How racism shapes urban spaces and how African Americans create vibrant communities that offer models for more equitable social arrangements.

The Wire

Urban Decay and American Television

Author: Tiffany Potter,C. W. Marshall

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 0826434770

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 264

View: 9322

The first collection of critical essays on HBO's The Wire - the most brilliant and socially relevant television series in years T he Wire is about survival, about the strategies adopted by those living and working in the inner cities of America. It presents a world where for many even hope isn't an option, where life operates as day-to-day existence without education, without job security, and without social structures. This is a world that is only grey, an exacting autopsy of a side of American life that has never seen the inside of a Starbucks. Over its five season, sixty-episode run (2002-2008), The Wire presented severall overlapping narrative threads, all set in the city of Baltimore. The series consistently deconstructed the conventional narratives of law, order, and disorder, offering a view of America that has never before been admitted to the public discourse of the televisual. It was bleak and at times excruciating. Even when the show made metatextual reference to its own world as Dickensian, it was too gentle by half. By focusing on four main topics (Crime, Law Enforcement, America, and Television), The Wire: Urban Decay and American Television examines the series' place within popular culture and its representation of the realities of inner city life, social institutions, and politics in contemporary American society. This is a brilliant collection of essays on a show that has taken the art of television drama to new heights.

Die Kunst der Filmregie

Author: David Mamet

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783895810329

Category: Filmregie

Page: 109

View: 7428

Front Stoops in the Fifties

Baltimore Legends Come of Age

Author: Michael Olesker

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421411601

Category: History

Page: 230

View: 9230

Front Stoops in the Fifties recounts the stories of some of Baltimore's most famous personalities as they grew up during the "decade of conformity." Such familiar names as Jerry Leiber, Nancy Pelosi, Thurgood Marshall, and Barry Levinson figure prominently in Michael Olesker’s gripping account, which draws on personal interviews and journalistic digging. Olesker marks the end of the fifties with the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. "It’s as if millions will suddenly decide to act out their anxieties and their rage, as if Kennedy’s murder exposed some hypocrisy at the heart of the American dream," he writes. Focusing on the period leading up to this turning point in U.S. history, Olesker looks to the individuals living through the changes that were just beginning to surface and would later come to prominence in the sixties. The fifties are often remembered with longing as a more innocent time. But it was also a suffocating time for many. Alongside innocence was ignorance. Olesker tells the story of Nancy D’Alesandro Pelosi, daughter of the mayor, who grew up in a political home and eventually became the first woman Speaker of the House. Thurgood Marshall, schooled in a racially segregated classroom, went on to argue Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka before the U.S. Supreme Court and rewrite race-relations law. Even the music changed. Olesker’s doo-wop portrait of Baltimore is nostalgic, but it has a hard edge. "Front Stoops in the Fifties is a fascinating read; one which convincingly makes the case that what was happening in the Baltimore of the 1950s was a microcosm of the shift that was happening all across America. The shocking part is just how relevant these stories remain today."—Baltimore Post-Examiner "A highly readable local history lesson on the good, the bad, and the ugly of life here in the extremely edgy city of Baltimore, Maryland. Michael Olesker digs deep and his scathing, alarming, and sometimes hilarious reporting of our past asks the question—have we come a long way in fifty years or are our race and class issues still scarily the same?"—John Waters "As someone who lived those very years, growing up in Baltimore, Michael Olesker brought back so many precise memories—with that enameled wisdom of a fine reporter that made me understand better what I had only fondly remembered. He got that old town of mine pitch perfect."—Frank Deford, commentator on NPR's Morning Edition "Through crisp writing and a careful synthesis of facts and events, Olesker makes a case that transformative changes in the American landscape were already taking place—and many of them had their origins amid the seeming innocence of Baltimore in the 1950s. From early rock 'n' roll to block-busting and urban flight, from the death of school prayer to the embrace of American youth culture, he chronicles a city at the brink. Front Stoops in the Fifties is a crisp, insightful dispatch from a skilled writer who knows his city and its history."—David Simon, executive producer of HBO's The Wire and Treme

Toxic Communities

Environmental Racism, Industrial Pollution, and Residential Mobility

Author: Dorceta Taylor

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479861626

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 7030

From St. Louis to New Orleans, from Baltimore to Oklahoma City, there are poor and minority neighborhoods so beset by pollution that just living in them can be hazardous to your health. Due to entrenched segregation, zoning ordinances that privilege wealthier communities, or because businesses have found the ‘paths of least resistance,’ there are many hazardous waste and toxic facilities in these communities, leading residents to experience health and wellness problems on top of the race and class discrimination most already experience. Taking stock of the recent environmental justice scholarship, Toxic Communities examines the connections among residential segregation, zoning, and exposure to environmental hazards. Renowned environmental sociologist Dorceta Taylor focuses on the locations of hazardous facilities in low-income and minority communities and shows how they have been dumped on, contaminated and exposed. Drawing on an array of historical and contemporary case studies from across the country, Taylor explores controversies over racially-motivated decisions in zoning laws, eminent domain, government regulation (or lack thereof), and urban renewal. She provides a comprehensive overview of the debate over whether or not there is a link between environmental transgressions and discrimination, drawing a clear picture of the state of the environmental justice field today and where it is going. In doing so, she introduces new concepts and theories for understanding environmental racism that will be essential for environmental justice scholars. A fascinating landmark study, Toxic Communities greatly contributes to the study of race, the environment, and space in the contemporary United States.

Gesellschaft, Handlung und Raum

Grundlagen handlungstheoretischer Sozialgeographie

Author: Benno Werlen,Wernfried Güth,Florian Danckwerth

Publisher: Franz Steiner Verlag

ISBN: 9783515070317

Category: History

Page: 462

View: 4442

Die politische Brisanz und soziale Bedeutung des "Gesellschaft-Raum-Verhaltnisses" hat die juengere europaische Geschichte nachdruecklich in Erinnerung gerufen. Was lange primar Gegenstand sozialgeographischer Theoriebildung war, ist damit ins Bewuatsein breiter Bevolkerungskreise gelangt und erweckt zunehmend auch das Interesse der Sozialwissenschaften. Damit wird neben der praktischen auch die sozialwissenschaftliche Relevanz geographischer Forschung offensichtlich. Hier wird deren Neuorientierung als Handlungswissenschaft zur Diskussion gestellt und es werden die dafuer notwendigen erkenntnis- und sozialtheoretischen Grundlagen erarbeitet. Dies schlieat in wichtigen Teilbereichen allerdings auch deren Reinterpretation ein. zu den vorherigen Auflagen: a... key reading for anyone concerned with the theory of social action and spatiality.o Society and Space aEs geschieht nicht allzu haufig, daa man bei der Lektuere einer geographischen Neuerscheinung sehr spontan und mit Nachdruck zur Uberzeugung kommt, ein wirklich grundlegendes Werk, sozusagen einen fachwissenschaftlichen Meilenstein, in Handen zu haben. Benno Werlens Buch war fuer den Rezensenten der seltene und ueberaus eindrucksvolle Beispielfall fuer ein derartiges Erlebnis.o Mitteilungen der Osterreichischen Geographischen Gesellschaft.

Model of Human Occupation (MOHO)

Grundlagen für die Praxis

Author: Gary Kielhofner,Ulrike Marotzki,Christiane Mentrup

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783540659426

Category: Medical

Page: 208

View: 8837

MOHO: Ergotherapie aus ganzheitlicher Sicht Das im deutschsprachigen Raum bereits bekannte und praktisch erprobte "Modell der menschlichen Betätigung" (Model of Human Occupation, MOHO) bietet Ihnen viele Denkanstöße und Anregungen für eine zeitgemäße systemische Ausrichtung Ihrer ergotherapeutischen Arbeit. * Was ist eigentlich "Betätigung"? * Welche Bedeutung hat sie für den Menschen im Alltagsverhalten? * Wie entsteht Motivation? * Welche Funktion haben automatisierte Routinehandlungen? * Wie entwickelt man Handlungsfertigkeiten? * Welchen Einfluss hat die Umwelt auf Betätigungsverhalten? Zu diesen und weiteren Grundbegriffen finden Sie Definitionen und ausführliche Erläuterungen, die Ihnen die MOHO-Grundlagen anschaulich und praktisch nachvollziehbar vor Augen führen. Anhand eines bundesweiten Projektes erfahren Sie zudem, wie Befundaufnahme und Dokumentation nach dem Modell in Deutschland praktisch umgesetzt werden. Das Grundlagenbuch für ErgotherapeutInnen zu einem bewährten Praxismodell