Brief History of English and American Literature

A Background on Literature

Author: Henry A. Beers

Publisher: Prabhat Prakashan

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 216

View: 7258

This book contains a brief history of English and American literature, it was written by Henry Augustin Beers and also contains an introduction and supplementary chapters on the Religious and Theological Literature of Great Britain and the United States by John Fletcher Hurst.

Brief History of English and American Literature

Author: Henry A. Beers

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781533233448

Category:

Page: 480

View: 8125

Notice: This Book is published by Historical Books Limited (www.publicdomain.org.uk) as a Public Domain Book, if you have any inquiries, requests or need any help you can just send an email to [email protected] This book is found as a public domain and free book based on various online catalogs, if you think there are any problems regard copyright issues please contact us immediately via [email protected]

Brief History of English and American Literature

Author: Henry A. Beers

Publisher: BiblioBazaar, LLC

ISBN: 9780554386102

Category: Education

Page: 436

View: 313

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.

A History of American Literature

Author: Richard Gray

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444345680

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 912

View: 8422

Updated throughout and with much new material, A History of American Literature, Second Edition, is the most up-to-date and comprehensive survey available of the myriad forms of American Literature from pre-Columbian times to the present. The most comprehensive and up-to-date history of American literature available today Covers fiction, poetry, drama, and non-fiction, as well as other forms of literature including folktale, spirituals, the detective story, the thriller, and science fiction Explores the plural character of American literature, including the contributions made by African American, Native American, Hispanic and Asian American writers Considers how our understanding of American literature has changed over the past?thirty years Situates American literature in the contexts of American history, politics and society Offers an invaluable introduction to American literature for students at all levels, academic and general readers

A Brief History of English Literature

Author: John Peck,Martin Coyle

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 1137352671

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 392

View: 1362

This new edition of an established text provides a lively, concise and up-to-date historical overview of the story of English literature. Focusing on how writing both reflects and challenges the periods in which it is produced, John Peck and Martin Coyle combine close readings of key texts with recent critical thinking on the interaction of literary works and culture. A Brief History of English Literature: • offers an engaging chronological narrative of all the main literary periods, from Anglo-Saxon times through to the present day • now features a new final chapter on twenty-first century literature and an updated Chronology and Further Reading section • places novels, poems, plays and other forms of writing in their social, political and cultural contexts • covers canonical and non-canonical texts. A true masterpiece of clarity and compression, this is essential reading for students of English Literature and general readers alike.

A Brief History of American Literature

Author: Richard Gray

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444392463

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 420

View: 8860

A Brief History of American Literature offers students and general readers a concise and up-to-date history of the full range of American writing from its origins until the present day. Represents the only up-to-date concise history of American literature Covers fiction, poetry, drama and non-fiction, as well as looking at other forms of literature including folktales, spirituals, the detective story, the thriller and science fiction Considers how our understanding of American literature has changed over the past twenty years Offers students an abridged version of History of American Literature, a book widely considered the standard survey text Provides an invaluable introduction to the subject for students of American literature, American studies and all those interested in the literature and culture of the United States

Europeana

A Brief History of the Twentieth Century

Author: Patrik Ouředník

Publisher: Dalkey Archive Press

ISBN: 9781564783820

Category: Fiction

Page: 122

View: 4921

Patrik Ourednik's first novel to be translated into English is a unique version of the history of the twentieth century.

Studies in Classic American Literature

Author: D. H. Lawrence,Ezra Greenspan,Lindeth Vasey

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521550161

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 632

View: 2257

Landmark volume of D. H. Lawrence's writings on American literature including major essays on Poe, Hawthorne, Melville and Whitman.

The Brief History of the Dead

Author: Kevin Brockmeier

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 1400095956

Category: Fiction

Page: 252

View: 7458

In an afterlife world inhabited by the recently departed who remain in the memories of the living, Marion and Phillip Byrd fall in love again, while on Earth, their daughter, Laura, is stranded alone in an Antarctic research station.

A Brief History of the Flood

Author: Jean Harfenist

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307424278

Category: Fiction

Page: 224

View: 4544

Lillian Anderson is a strong-minded, backwoods-Minnesota girl, well-versed in the basics of survival. She can find air to breathe under a capsized boat, drive in a blizzard, or capture a wild duck. As part of a large struggling family, she tiptoes around her explosive father whose best days always come right after he’s poached something and her neurotically optimistic mother whose bursts of vigor bring added chaos. Lillian barrels through adolescence with no illusions about her future, honing her clerical skills while working the nightshift as a salad girl in the airport kitchen. Just as she’s on her feet and moving out, their house is literally sinking into the marsh. Stunningly honest, this story explores the fierce love that binds family together. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Native American Literature

A Brief Introduction and Anthology

Author: Gerald Robert Vizenor

Publisher: New York ; Don Mills, Ont. : Longman

ISBN: 9780673469786

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 372

View: 8410

This is one of a series of brief anthologies designed for ethnic, multicultural and American literature courses. The series aims to introduce undergraduates to the rich but often neglected literary contributions of established and newer ethnic writers to American literature. Each text is organized chronlogically by genre and represents a wide range of literature. An introduction provides an historical overview and a celebration of the diversity within each ethnic group. It also addresses the general literary concerns students are likely to encounter in their readings. A seperate thematic table of contents provides the tutor with more flexibility in the classroom. All four anthologies include three bibliographies which suggest novels for further reading; aid students in their research and recommend films that would enhance the studies. Ishmael Reed, the general editor, is founder of the American Book Awards.

Borrowed Words

A History of Loanwords in English

Author: Philip Durkin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199574995

Category: History

Page: 491

View: 9032

This accessible history of how, when, and why English has borrowed words from other languages shows how to discover their origins, when and why they were adopted, and what happens to them later. The history of English shows the effects of contact with languages in many contexts, including range from Latin, Greek, Scandinavian, Celtic, French, Italian, Spanish, and Russian, to Hebrew, Maori, Malay, Chinese, Hindi, Japanese, and Yiddish. Philip Durkin describes theepisodes as they occurred, from Saxon times to the present, in a book that will appeal to everyone interested in the history of English.

The English and Their History

Author: Robert Tombs

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 1101874775

Category: History

Page: 1040

View: 5266

A New York Times 2016 Notable Book Robert Tombs’s momentous The English and Their History is both a startlingly fresh and a uniquely inclusive account of the people who have a claim to be the oldest nation in the world. The English first came into existence as an idea, before they had a common ruler and before the country they lived in even had a name. They have lasted as a recognizable entity ever since, and their defining national institutions can be traced back to the earliest years of their history. The English have come a long way from those first precarious days of invasion and conquest, with many spectacular changes of fortune. Their political, economic and cultural contacts have left traces for good and ill across the world. This book describes their history and its meanings from their beginnings in the monasteries of Northumbria and the wetlands of Wessex to the cosmopolitan energy of today’s England. Robert Tombs draws out important threads running through the story, including participatory government, language, law, religion, the land and the sea, and ever-changing relations with other peoples. Not the least of these connections are the ways the English have understood their own history, have argued about it, forgotten it and yet been shaped by it. These diverse and sometimes conflicting understandings are an inherent part of their identity. Rather to their surprise, as ties within the United Kingdom loosen, the English are suddenly embarking on a new chapter. The English and Their History, the first single-volume work on this scale for more than half a century, and which incorporates a wealth of recent scholarship, presents a challenging modern account of this immense and continuing story, bringing out the strength and resilience of English government, the deep patterns of division and also the persistent capacity to come together in the face of danger.

Sapiens

A Brief History of Humankind

Author: Yuval Noah Harari

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062316109

Category: Science

Page: 464

View: 7276

New York Times Bestseller A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.” One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us? Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas. Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become? Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.

The American Revolution

A Very Short Introduction

Author: Robert J. Allison

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0190225068

Category: History

Page: 130

View: 5615

Original edition has subtitle: a concise history.

A History of the American People

Author: Paul Johnson

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 9780061952135

Category: History

Page: 1104

View: 2545

The prize winning classic work on the post Civil War period which wrenched American society, now with a new introduction by the author. "The creation of the United States of America is the greatest of all human adventures," begins Paul Johnson’s remarkable new American history. "No other national story holds such tremendous lessons, for the American people themselves and for the rest of mankind." Johnson’s history is a reinterpretation of American history from the first settlements to the Clinton administration. It covers every aspect of U.S. history—politics; business and economics; art, literature and science; society and customs; complex traditions and religious beliefs. The story is told in terms of the men and women who shaped and led the nation and the ordinary people who collectively created its unique character. Wherever possible, letters, diaries, and recorded conversations are used to ensure a sense of actuality. "The book has new and often trenchant things to say about every aspect and period of America’s past," says Johnson, "and I do not seek, as some historians do, to conceal my opinions." This is an in-depth portrait of a great people, from their fragile origins through their struggles for independence and nationhood, their heroic efforts and sacrifices to deal with the 'organic sin’ of slavery and the preservation of the Union to its explosive economic growth and emergence as a world power and its sole superpower. Johnson discusses such contemporary topics as the politics of racism, education, Vietnam, the power of the press, political correctness, the growth of litigation, and the rising influence of women. He sees Americans as a problem-solving people and the story of America as "essentially one of difficulties being overcome by intelligence and skill, by faith and strength of purpose, by courage and persistence... Looking back on its past, and forward to its future, the auguries are that it will not disappoint humanity." This challenging narrative and interpretation of American history by the author of many distinguished historical works is sometimes controversial and always provocative. Johnson’s views of individuals, events, themes, and issues are original, critical, and admiring, for he is, above all, a strong believer in the history and the destiny of the American people.

Anti-Intellectualism in American Life

Author: Richard Hofstadter

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307809676

Category: Social Science

Page: 464

View: 8256

Winner of the 1964 Pulitzer Prize in Non-Fiction. In this award-winning classic work of consensus history, Richard Hofstadter, author of The Age of Reform, examines the role of social movements in the perception of intellect in American life. "As Mr. Hofstadter unfolds the fascinating story, it is no crude battle of eggheads and fatheads. It is a rich, complex, shifting picture of the life of the mind in a society dominated by the ideal of practical success." --Robert Peel in the Christian Science Monitor

The Strangers Book

The Human of African American Literature

Author: Lloyd Pratt

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 081224768X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 200

View: 6642

The Strangers Book explores how various nineteenth-century African American writers radically reframed the terms of humanism by redefining what it meant to be a stranger. Rejecting the idea that humans have easy access to a common reserve of experiences and emotions, they countered the notion that a person can use a supposed knowledge of human nature to claim full understanding of any other person's life. Instead they posited that being a stranger, unknown and unknowable, was an essential part of the human condition. Affirming the unknown and unknowable differences between people, as individuals and in groups, laid the groundwork for an ethical and democratic society in which all persons could find a place. If everyone is a stranger, then no individual or class can lay claim to the characteristics that define who gets to be a human in political and public arenas. Lloyd Pratt focuses on nineteenth-century African American writing and publishing venues and practices such as the Colored National Convention movement and literary societies in Nantucket and New Orleans. Examining the writing of Frederick Douglass in tandem with that of the francophone free men of color who published the first anthology of African American poetry in 1845, he contends these authors were never interested in petitioning whites for sympathy or for recognition of their humanity. Instead, they presented a moral imperative to develop practices of stranger humanism in order to forge personal and political connections based on mutually acknowledged and always evolving differences.

Why Literary Periods Mattered

Historical Contrast and the Prestige of English Studies

Author: Ted Underwood

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 0804788448

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 216

View: 1566

In the mid-nineteenth century, the study of English literature began to be divided into courses that surveyed discrete "periods." Since that time, scholars' definitions of literature and their rationales for teaching it have changed radically. But the periodized structure of the curriculum has remained oddly unshaken, as if the exercise of contrasting one literary period with another has an importance that transcends the content of any individual course. Why Literary Periods Mattered explains how historical contrast became central to literary study, and why it remained institutionally central in spite of critical controversy about literature itself. Organizing literary history around contrast rather than causal continuity helped literature departments separate themselves from departments of history. But critics' long reliance on a rhetoric of contrasted movements and fateful turns has produced important blind spots in the discipline. In the twenty-first century, Underwood argues, literary study may need digital technology in particular to develop new methods of reasoning about gradual, continuous change.