"Brown" in Baltimore

School Desegregation and the Limits of Liberalism

Author: Howell S. Baum

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801457106

Category: Education

Page: N.A

View: 6972

In the first book to present the history of Baltimore school desegregation, Howell S. Baum shows how good intentions got stuck on what Gunnar Myrdal called the "American Dilemma." Immediately after the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision, the city's liberal school board voted to desegregate and adopted a free choice policy that made integration voluntary. Baltimore's school desegregation proceeded peacefully, without the resistance or violence that occurred elsewhere. However, few whites chose to attend school with blacks, and after a few years of modest desegregation, schools resegregated and became increasingly segregated. The school board never changed its policy. Black leaders had urged the board to adopt free choice and, despite the limited desegregation, continued to support the policy and never sued the board to do anything else. Baum finds that American liberalism is the key to explaining how this happened. Myrdal observed that many whites believed in equality in the abstract but considered blacks inferior and treated them unequally. School officials were classical liberals who saw the world in terms of individuals, not races. They adopted a desegregation policy that explicitly ignored students' race and asserted that all students were equal in freedom to choose schools, while their policy let whites who disliked blacks avoid integration. School officials' liberal thinking hindered them from understanding or talking about the city's history of racial segregation, continuing barriers to desegregation, and realistic change strategies. From the classroom to city hall, Baum examines how Baltimore's distinct identity as a border city between North and South shaped local conversations about the national conflict over race and equality. The city's history of wrestling with the legacy of Brown reveals Americans' preferred way of dealing with racial issues: not talking about race. This avoidance, Baum concludes, allows segregation to continue.

Six Lost Leaders

Prophets of Civil Society

Author: George W. Liebmann

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9780739102336

Category: Political Science

Page: 254

View: 1638

Peter Andreas & Timothy Snyder have put togetheran excellent book. The essays in this volume offer acritique of the growing literature on globalization,reminding us that, in spite of trendy arguments about thede-territorialization of the state, borders still matter.-James F. Hollifield Southern Methodist University

Freedom's Port

The African American Community of Baltimore, 1790-1860

Author: Christopher Phillips

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252066184

Category: History

Page: 350

View: 9505

Born along the Color Line

The 1933 Amenia Conference and the Rise of a National Civil Rights Movement

Author: Eben Miller

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199913463

Category: Social Science

Page: 368

View: 7264

In August, 1933, dozens of people gathered amid seven large, canvas tents in a field near Amenia, in upstate New York. Joel Spingarn, president of the board of the NAACP, had called a conference to revitalize the flagging civil rights organization. In Amenia, such old lions as the 65 year-old W.E.B. DuBois would mingle with "the coming leaders of Negro thought." It was a fascinating encounter that would transform the civil rights movement. With elegant writing and piercing insight, historian Eben Miller narrates how this little-known conference brought together a remarkable young group of African American activists, capturing through the lives of five extraordinary participants--youth activist Juanita Jackson, diplomat Ralph Bunche, economist Abram Harris, lawyer Louis Redding, and Harlem organizer Moran Weston--how this generation shaped the ongoing movement for civil rights during the Depression, World War II, and beyond. Miller describes how Jackson, Bunche, Harris, and the others felt that, amidst the global crisis of the 1930s, it was urgent to move beyond the NAACP's legal and political focus to build an economic movement that reached across the racial divide to challenge the capitalist system that had collapsed so devastatingly. They advocated alliances with labor groups, agitated for equal education, and campaigned for anti-lynching legislation and open access to the ballot and employment--spreading their influential ideas through their writings and by mass organizing in African American communities across the country, North and South. In their arguments and individual awakenings, they formed a key bridge between the turn-of-the-century Talented Tenth and the postwar civil rights generation, broadening and advancing the fight for racial equality through the darkest economic times the country has ever faced. In Born along the Color Line, Miller vividly captures the emergence of a forgotten generation of African American leaders, a generation that made Brown v. Board of Education and all that followed from it possible. It is an illuminating portrait of the "long civil rights movement," not the movement that began in the 1950s, but the one that took on new life at Amenia in 1933

States at War, Volume 4

A Reference Guide for Delaware, Maryland, and New Jersey in the Civil War

Author: Richard F. Miller

Publisher: University Press of New England

ISBN: 1611686229

Category: History

Page: 880

View: 2807

While many Civil War reference books exist, there is no single compendium that contains important details about the combatant states (and territories) that Civil War researchers can readily access for their work. People looking for information about the organizations, activities, economies, demographics, and prominent personalities of Civil War States and state governments must assemble data from a variety of sources, with many key sources remaining unavailable online. This crucial reference book, the fourth in the States at War series, provides vital information on the organization, activities, economies, demographics, and prominent personalities of Delaware, Maryland, and New Jersey during the Civil War. Its principal sources include the Official Records, state adjutant-general reports, legislative journals, state and federal legislation, federal and state executive speeches and proclamations, and the general and special orders issued by the military authorities of both governments, North and South. Designed and organized for easy use by professional historians and amateurs, this book can be read in two ways: by individual state, with each chapter offering a stand-alone history of an individual stateÕs war years; or across states, comparing reactions to the same event or solutions to the same problems.

The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln

Author: Abraham Lincoln

Publisher: Wildside Press LLC

ISBN: 9781434476982

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 580

View: 1813

The collected letters, speeches, etc. written by Abraham Lincoln.

Six Days in April

Lincoln and the Union in Peril

Author: Frank B. Marcotte

Publisher: Algora Publishing

ISBN: 0875863159

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 188

View: 8425

"This is a historical account including first-person views, of the roles played by five men during six crucial days in 1861 who vied to control the communication links to Washington. These events encapsulate the complexity of motives and logistics, and the mixed shifting loyalties, that characterized much of the Civil War"--Provided by publisher.

Pennsylvania Biographical Dictionary

Author: Jan Onofrio

Publisher: Somerset Publishers, Inc.

ISBN: 0403099501

Category: History

Page: 1567

View: 588

Pennsylvania Biographical Dictionary contains biographies on hundreds of persons from diverse vocations that were either born, achieved notoriety and/or died in the state of Pennsylvania. Prominent persons, in addition to the less eminent, that have played noteworthy roles are included in this resource. When people are recognized from your state or locale it brings a sense of pride to the residents of the entire state.

Lincoln

A Novel

Author: Gore Vidal

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307784231

Category: Fiction

Page: 672

View: 1448

Lincoln is the cornerstone of Gore Vidal's fictional American chronicle, which includes Burr, 1876, Washington, D.C., Empire, and Hollywood. It opens early on a frozen winter morning in 1861, when President-elect Abraham Lincoln slips into Washington, flanked by two bodyguards. The future president is in disguise, for there is talk of a plot to murder him. During the next four years there will be numerous plots to murder this man who has sworn to unite a disintegrating nation. Isolated in a ramshackle White House in the center of a proslavery city, Lincoln presides over a fragmenting government as Lee's armies beat at the gates. In this profoundly moving novel, a work of epic proportions and intense human sympathy, Lincoln is observed by his loved ones and his rivals. The cast of characters is almost Dickensian: politicians, generals, White House aides, newspapermen, Northern and Southern conspirators, amiably evil bankers, and a wife slowly going mad. Vidal's portrait of the president is at once intimate and monumental, stark and complex, drawn with the wit, grace, and authority of one of the great historical novelists. With a new Introduction by the author. From the Hardcover edition.

Jeep Trails to Colorado Ghost Towns

Author: Robert L. Brown

Publisher: Caxton Press

ISBN: 9780870040214

Category: Travel

Page: 239

View: 750

Distributed by the University of Nebraska Press for Caxton Press Settle into your four-wheel-drive vehicle or a chair and take off for the mining camps of Colorado! This book is an illustrated history of fifty-nine towns famous during the gold and silver rushes of the 1800s, with directions on how to get to each.

A Record of Interments at the Friends Burial Ground, Baltimore, Maryland

Author: E. Erick Hoopes,Christina Hoopes

Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com

ISBN: 0806345535

Category: Reference

Page: 66

View: 617

This is a faithful transcription of the tombstones found in the old Quaker cemetery located along Harford Road in Baltimore, Maryland. The transcriptions generally provide the deceased's full name, date of death, and age at death. Where possible the compilers have also furnished the names of spouses or other relatives appearing on the gravestones or surfacing from their research. Quaker historians will also appreciate the informative history of the Friends Burial Ground compiled by the Hoopes.This volume is available on our Family Archive CD 7521.

A Paris Life, A Baltimore Treasure

The Remarkable Lives of George A. Lucas and His Art Collection

Author: Stanley Mazaroff

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421424452

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 7631

In 1857, George A. Lucas, a young Baltimorean who was fluent in French and enamored of French art, arrived in Paris. There, he established an extensive personal network of celebrated artists and art dealers, becoming the quintessential French connection for American collectors. The most remarkable thing about Lucas was not the art that he acquired for his clients (who included William and Henry Walters, the founders of the Walters Art Museum, and John Taylor Johnston, the founding president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art) but the massive collection of 18,000 paintings, drawings, sculptures, and etchings, as well as 1,500 books, journals, and other sources about French artists, that he acquired for himself. Paintings by Cabanel, Corot, and Daubigny, prints by Whistler, Manet, and Cassatt, and portfolios of information about hundreds of French artists filled his apartment and spilled into the adjacent flat of his mistress. Based primarily on Lucas’s notes and diaries, as well as thousands of other archival documents, Stanley Mazaroff’s A Paris Life, A Baltimore Treasure tells the fascinating story of how Lucas brought together the most celebrated French artists with the most prominent and wealthy American collectors of the time. It also details how, nearing the end of his life, Lucas struggled to find a future home for his collection, eventually giving it to Baltimore’s Maryland Institute. Without the means to care for the collection, the Institute loaned it to the Baltimore Museum of Art, where most of the art was placed in storage and disappeared from public view. But in 1990, when the Institute proposed to auction or otherwise sell the collection, it rose from obscurity, reached new glory as an irreplaceable cultural treasure, and became the subject of an epic battle fought in and out of court that captivated public attention and enflamed the passions of art lovers and museum officials across the nation. A Paris Life, A Baltimore Treasure is a richly illustrated portrayal of Lucas's fascinating life as an agent, connoisseur, and collector of French mid-nineteenth-century art. And, as revealed in the book, following Lucas's death, his enormous collection continued to have a vibrant life of its own, presenting new challenges to museum officials in studying, conserving, displaying, and ultimately saving the collection as an important and intrinsic part of the culture of our time.

Shakespeare Companies and Festivals

An International Guide

Author: Ron Engle,Felicia Hardison Londré,Daniel J. Watermeier

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313274343

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 568

View: 8814

Describes over 140 Shakespeare companies and festivals worldwide.

Baltimore

Its History and Its People

Author: Lewis Historical Publishing Co

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Baltimore (Md.)

Page: N.A

View: 963

Historic Amusement Parks of Baltimore

An Illustrated History

Author: John P. Coleman

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 1476616485

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 252

View: 1737

This book presents the rich history of the old amusement parks and beach resorts frequented by Baltimoreans beginning in the 1870s and stretching into the late 20th century. Readers may recognize such popular amusement parks as Gwynn Oak, Carlin’s, and Tolchester Beach, and will learn about some of the more obscure places like Frederick Road Park and Hollywood Park. Each of the major parks is documented here, complete with a detailed history of the sites they were built on, the creative owners behind the parks’ inceptions, the individuals and companies who provided the rides and attractions, and, the people that happily traveled by boat, streetcar, train and automobile to reach their favorite park or resort.

Maryland Reports

Author: Thomas Harris (of Baltimore.)

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law reports, digests, etc

Page: N.A

View: 6743

Baltimore's Mansion

A Memoir

Author: Wayne Johnston

Publisher: Vintage Canada

ISBN: 9780307375438

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 3630

Baltimore's Mansion introduces us to the Johnstons of Ferryland, a Catholic colony founded by Lord Baltimore in the 1620s on the Avalon Peninsula of Newfoundland, and centres on three generations of fathers and sons. Filled with heart-stopping description and a cast of stubborn, acerbic, yet utterly irresistible family members, it is an evocation of a time and a place reminiscent of Wayne Johnston's best fiction. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Marshall: Lessons in Leadership

Author: H. Paul Jeffers,Alan Axelrod

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 9780230109452

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 224

View: 3821

General George C. Marshall was a skillful and compassionate leader with a unique legacy. He never fired a shot during WWII and led no troops into battle—his brilliance was purely strategic and diplomatic, and incredibly effective. He was responsible for the building, supplying, and, in part, the deployment of over eight million soldiers. In 1947, as Secretary of State, he created the Marshall Plan, a sweeping economic recovery effort that pulled the war-shattered European nations out of ruin, and gave impetus to NATO and the European Common Market. It was for the Marshall Plan that he won the Nobel Peace Prize—the only time in history a military commander has ever been awarded this honor. Marshall's skilled combination of military strategy and politics, emphasis on planning as well as execution, and his expertise in nation-building holds lessons for military and civilian leaders today.

Brown v. Board of Education

A Civil Rights Milestone and Its Troubled Legacy

Author: James T. Patterson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199880840

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 7156

2004 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Supreme Court's unanimous decision to end segregation in public schools. Many people were elated when Supreme Court Chief Justice Earl Warren delivered Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka in May 1954, the ruling that struck down state-sponsored racial segregation in America's public schools. Thurgood Marshall, chief attorney for the black families that launched the litigation, exclaimed later, "I was so happy, I was numb." The novelist Ralph Ellison wrote, "another battle of the Civil War has been won. The rest is up to us and I'm very glad. What a wonderful world of possibilities are unfolded for the children!" Here, in a concise, moving narrative, Bancroft Prize-winning historian James T. Patterson takes readers through the dramatic case and its fifty-year aftermath. A wide range of characters animates the story, from the little-known African Americans who dared to challenge Jim Crow with lawsuits (at great personal cost); to Thurgood Marshall, who later became a Justice himself; to Earl Warren, who shepherded a fractured Court to a unanimous decision. Others include segregationist politicians like Governor Orval Faubus of Arkansas; Presidents Eisenhower, Johnson, and Nixon; and controversial Supreme Court justices such as William Rehnquist and Clarence Thomas. Most Americans still see Brown as a triumph--but was it? Patterson shrewdly explores the provocative questions that still swirl around the case. Could the Court--or President Eisenhower--have done more to ensure compliance with Brown? Did the decision touch off the modern civil rights movement? How useful are court-ordered busing and affirmative action against racial segregation? To what extent has racial mixing affected the academic achievement of black children? Where indeed do we go from here to realize the expectations of Marshall, Ellison, and others in 1954?