Can Journalism Survive?

An Inside Look at American Newsrooms

Author: David M. Ryfe

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 074566413X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 230

View: 3754

Journalists have failed to respond adequately to the challenge of the Internet, with far-reaching consequences for the future of journalism and democracy. This is the compelling argument set forth in this timely new text, drawing on the most extensive ethnographic fieldwork in American newsrooms since the 1970s. David Ryfe argues that journalists are unable or unwilling to innovate for a variety of reasons: in part because habits are sticky and difficult to dislodge; in part because of their strategic calculation that the cost of change far exceeds its benefit; and in part because basic definitions of what journalism is, and what it is for, anchor journalism to tradition even when journalists prefer to change. The result is that journalism is unraveling as an integrated social field; it may never again be a separate and separable activity from the broader practice of producing news. One thing is certain: whatever happens next, it will have dramatic consequences for the role journalism plays in democratic society and perhaps will transform its basic meaning and purpose. Can Journalism Survive? is essential and provocative reading for all concerned with the future of journalism and society.

Can Journalism Survive

An Inside Look at American Newsrooms

Author: David M. Ryfe

Publisher: Polity

ISBN: 9780745654287

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 256

View: 7958

Journalists have failed to respond adequately to the challenge of the Internet, with far-reaching consequences for the future of journalism and democracy. This is the compelling argument set forth in this timely new text, drawing on the most extensive ethnographic fieldwork in American newsrooms since the 1970s. David Ryfe argues that journalists are unable or unwilling to innovate for a variety of reasons: in part because habits are sticky and difficult to dislodge; in part because of their strategic calculation that the cost of change far exceeds its benefit; and in part because basic definitions of what journalism is, and what it is for, anchor journalism to tradition even when journalists prefer to change. The result is that journalism is unraveling as an integrated social field; it may never again be a separate and separable activity from the broader practice of producing news. One thing is certain: whatever happens next, it will have dramatic consequences for the role journalism plays in democratic society and perhaps will transform its basic meaning and purpose. Can Journalism Survive? is essential and provocative reading for all concerned with the future of journalism and society.

Can Journalism Survive

An Inside Look at American Newsrooms

Author: David M. Ryfe

Publisher: Polity

ISBN: 9780745654270

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 256

View: 4622

Journalists have failed to respond adequately to the challenge of the Internet, with far-reaching consequences for the future of journalism and democracy. This is the compelling argument set forth in this timely new text, drawing on the most extensive ethnographic fieldwork in American newsrooms since the 1970s. David Ryfe argues that journalists are unable or unwilling to innovate for a variety of reasons: in part because habits are sticky and difficult to dislodge; in part because of their strategic calculation that the cost of change far exceeds its benefit; and in part because basic definitions of what journalism is, and what it is for, anchor journalism to tradition even when journalists prefer to change. The result is that journalism is unraveling as an integrated social field; it may never again be a separate and separable activity from the broader practice of producing news. One thing is certain: whatever happens next, it will have dramatic consequences for the role journalism plays in democratic society and perhaps will transform its basic meaning and purpose. Can Journalism Survive? is essential and provocative reading for all concerned with the future of journalism and society.

Making News at The New York Times

Author: Nikki Usher

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 0472035967

Category: Social Science

Page: 283

View: 6645

An ethnographic study of The New York Times' business desk provides a unique vantage point to see the future for news in the digital age.

Rebuilding the News

Metropolitan Journalism in the Digital Age

Author: C. W. Anderson

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 9781439909331

Category: Social Science

Page: 218

View: 6056

Breaking down the walls of the traditional newsroom, Rebuilding the News traces the evolution of news reporting as it moves from print to online. As the business models of newspapers have collapsed, author C. W. Anderson chronicles how bloggers, citizen journalists, and social networks are implicated in the massive changes confronting journalism. Through a combination of local newsroom fieldwork, social-network analysis, and online archival research, Rebuilding the News places the current shifts in news production in socio-historical context. Focusing on the Philadelphia Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News, Anderson presents a gripping case study of how these papers have struggled to adapt to emerging economic, social, and technological realities. As he explores the organizational, networked culture of journalism, Anderson lays bare questions about the future of news-oriented media and its evolving relationship with “the public” in the digital age.

Murder in the News

An Inside Look at How Television Covers Crime

Author: Robert H. Jordan, Jr.

Publisher: Prometheus Books

ISBN: 1633883272

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 253

View: 3994

Television news anchor Robert Jordan Jr. draws from forty-seven years of news experiences to provide an eye-opening look at how news programs decide which murders to cover and which ones to ignore. Jordan takes readers behind the scenes into the big city newsrooms of Chicago. Here split-second decisions are made on where to send limited resources when dozens of shootings and several murders are occurring on a daily basis. Using interviews from decision makers--such as assignment editors and producers--who work daily in the trenches of working newsrooms, the reader learns how they decide where to send reporters; when to dispatch live trucks; and how the stories will be treated as they are placed in the shows. Why will one story get "breaking news" banners and be placed at the top of the show while others may not make the broadcast at all or may be given casual mention in later segments of the show? Additionally, Jordan reveals the results of a ground-breaking questionnaire sent to producers and assignment editors at Chicago television stations to assess their rationales for covering murders stories the way they do. He also gives readers a first-hand account of some of the major murder cases he has covered over the years, including the infamous Richard Speck, Jeffery Dahmer, and John Wayne Gacy murder investigations. aaaa Finally, Jordan examines how the explosion of social media platforms has changed the dynamic of reporting news and why murders are the perfect stories for television, as news organizations struggle to survive.

Presidents in Culture

The Meaning of Presidential Communication

Author: David Ryfe

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 9780820474564

Category: History

Page: 249

View: 6412

Whether writing from the perspective of rhetoric or political science, scholars of presidential communication often assume that the ultimate meaning of presidential rhetoric lies in whether it achieves policy success. In this book, David Michael Ryfe argues that although presidential rhetoric has many meanings, one of the most important is how it rhetorically constructs the practice of presidential communication itself. Drawing upon an examination of presidential rhetoric in the twentieth century - from Theodore Roosevelt to Franklin D. Roosevelt, from Ronald Reagan to Bill Clinton - Ryfe surveys the shifting meaning of presidential communication. In doing so, he reveals that the so-called public or rhetorical presidency is not one fixed entity, but rather a continuously negotiated discursive construct.

Out of the News

Former Journalists Discuss a Profession in Crisis

Author: Celia Viggo Wexler

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786492716

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 203

View: 6093

"This is a work of media history and criticism . It presents profiles of 11 journalists who left some of the country's biggest mainstream media outlets, and took on new challenges. Their stories give the reader a sense of what it means to be a reporter and to cover big news. But this book goes beyond media memoir"--Provided by publisher.

Morning Miracle

Inside the Washington Post: A Great Newspaper Fights for Its Life

Author: Dave Kindred

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 0767928148

Category: Social Science

Page: 266

View: 5269

An unstinting portrait of the early twenty-first-century newsroom draws on candid exchanges with top journalists to provide insights into topics ranging from journalistic integrity and blogging to profit demands and free speech.

Dropping the MIC - My Break-Up with the American Media

Author: Joangel Concepcion

Publisher: US Naval Institute Press

ISBN: 9781786930101

Category:

Page: 232

View: 9257

"You should know this book has a lot to do with the sad truth about journalism: what goes on inside of a newsroom can be just as ugly as the world we report on." After reaching the height of her career by becoming a top market news reporter, Joangel Concepcion decided to abandon the profession she loved. In Dropping the Mic, Joangel shares a rare glimpse inside the politics, toxicity and daily pressures of American news stations.Off the newsroom payroll, she takes you on her tumultuous journey reporting on a range of important, national news - including gun control, the Ebola virus, immigration and spillover violence from Mexico, along the American border.Her story explores the world of journalism as the industry adapts to the inevitable social media takedown in current society, budget cuts, and public distrust.Dropping the Mic is also about so much more.It is an inspiring story about survival, owning who you areand being brave enough to know when to walk away.

Digitizing the News

Innovation in Online Newspapers

Author: Pablo J. Boczkowski

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262524391

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 243

View: 8188

A study of the development of nonprint publishing by American daily newspapers: how new media emerge by combining existing media structures and practices with new technical capabilities.

It's Even Worse Than It Looks

How the American Constitutional System Collided with the New Politics of Extremism

Author: Thomas E. Mann,Norman J. Ornstein

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465096735

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 5580

Hyperpartisanship is as old as American democracy. But now, acrimony is not confined to a moment; it's a permanent state of affairs and has seeped into every part of the political process. Identifying the overriding problems that have led Congress—and the United States—to the brink of institutional collapse, It's Even Worse Than It Looks profoundly altered the debate about why America's government has become so dysfunctional. Through a new preface and afterword, Thomas Mann and Norman Ornstein bring the story forward, examining the 2012 presidential campaign and exploring the prospects of a less dysfunctional government. As provocative and controversial as ever, It's Even Worse Than It Looks will continue to set the terms of our political debate in the years to come.

Journalism in an Era of Big Data

Cases, concepts, and critiques

Author: Seth C. Lewis

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315533278

Category: Social Science

Page: 158

View: 6622

Big data is marked by staggering growth in the collection and analysis of digital trace information regarding human and natural activity, bound up in and enabled by the rise of persistent connectivity, networked communication, smart machines, and the internet of things. In addition to their impact on technology and society, these developments have particular significance for the media industry and for journalism as a practice and a profession. These data-centric phenomena are, by some accounts, poised to greatly influence, if not transform, some of the most fundamental aspects of news and its production and distribution by humans and machines. What such changes actually mean for news, democracy, and public life, however, is far from certain. As such, there is a need for scholarly scrutiny and critique of this trend, and this volume thus explores a range of phenomena—from the use of algorithms in the newsroom, to the emergence of automated news stories—at the intersection between journalism and the social, computer, and information sciences. What are the implications of such developments for journalism’s professional norms, routines, and ethics? For its organizations, institutions, and economics? For its authority and expertise? And for the epistemology that underwrites journalism’s role as knowledge-producer and sense-maker in society? Altogether, this book offers a first step in understanding what big data means for journalism. This book was originally published as a special issue of Digital Journalism.

The News About the News

American Journalism in Peril

Author: Leonard Downie, Jr.,Robert G. Kaiser

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307429067

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 5069

Freedom of the press is a primary American value. Good journalism builds communities, arms citizens with important information, and serves as a public watchdog for civic, national, and global issues. But what happens when the news turns its back on its public role? Leonard Downie Jr., executive editor of The Washington Post, and Robert G. Kaiser, associate editor and senior correspondent, report on a growing crisis in American journalism. From the corporatization that leads media moguls to slash content for profit, to newsrooms that ignore global crises to report on personal entertainment, these veteran journalists chronicle an erosion of independent, relevant journalism. In the process, they make clear why incorruptible reporting is crucial to American society. Rooted in interviews and first-hand accounts, the authors take us inside the politically charged world of one of America’s powerful institutions, the media. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Remaking the News

Essays on the Future of Journalism Scholarship in the Digital Age

Author: Pablo J. Boczkowski,C. W. Anderson

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262036096

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 376

View: 3136

Leading scholars chart the future of studies on technology and journalism in the digital age.

Makes Me Wanna Holler

A Young Black Man in America

Author: Nathan McCall

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307787680

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 432

View: 9149

One of our most visceral and important memoirs on race in America, this is the story of Nathan McCall, who began life as a smart kid in a close, protective family in a black working-class neighborhood. Yet by the age of fifteen, McCall was packing a gun and embarking on a criminal career that five years later would land him in prison for armed robbery. In these pages, McCall chronicles his passage from the street to the prison yard—and, later, to the newsrooms of The Washington Post and ultimately to the faculty of Emory University. His story is at once devastating and inspiring. For even as he recounts his transformation, McCall compels us to recognize that racism is as pervasive in the newsroom as it is in the inner city, where it condemns so many black men to prison, to dead-end jobs, or to violent deaths. At once an indictment and an elegy, Makes Me Wanna Holler became an instant classic when it was first published in 1994. Now, some two decades later, it continues to bear witness to the great troubles—and the great hopes—of our nation. With a new afterword by the author

Online Journalism in Africa

Trends, Practices and Emerging Cultures

Author: Hayes Mawindi Mabweazara,Okoth Fred Mudhai,Jason Whittaker

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134109067

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 274

View: 7073

Very little is known about how African journalists are forging "new" ways to practise their profession on the web. Against this backdrop, this volume provides contextually rooted discussions of trends, practices, and emerging cultures of web-based journalism(s) across the continent, offering a comprehensive research tool that can both stand the test of time as well as offer researchers (particularly those in the economically developed Global North) models for cross-cultural comparative research. The essays here deploy either a wide range of evidence or adopt a case-study approach to engage with contemporary developments in African online journalism. This book thus makes up for the gap in cross-cultural studies that seek to understand online journalism in all its complexities.

News in a New America

Author: Sally Lehrman,John S. and James L. Knight Foundation

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780974970219

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 152

View: 4907

The Routledge Companion to Digital Journalism Studies

Author: Bob Franklin,Scott Eldridge II

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1317499077

Category: Social Science

Page: 614

View: 3174

The Routledge Companion to Digital Journalism Studies offers an unprecedented collection of essays addressing the key issues and debates shaping the field of Digital Journalism Studies today. Across the last decade, journalism has undergone many changes, which have driven scholars to reassess its most fundamental questions, and in the face of digital change, to ask again: ‘Who is a journalist?’ and ‘What is journalism?’. This companion explores a developing scholarly agenda committed to understanding digital journalism and brings together the work of key scholars seeking to address key theoretical concerns and solve unique methodological riddles. Compiled of 58 original essays from distinguished academics across the globe, this Companion draws together the work of those making sense of this fundamental reconceptualization of journalism, and assesses its impacts on journalism’s products, its practices, resources, and its relationship with audiences. It also outlines the challenge presented by studying digital journalism and, more importantly, offers a first set of answers. This collection is the very first of its kind to attempt to distinguish this emerging field as a unique area of academic inquiry. Through identifying its core questions and presenting its fundamental debates, this Companion sets the agenda for years to come in defining this new field of study as Digital Journalism Studies, making it an essential point of reference for students and scholars of journalism.

The Vanishing Newspaper [2nd Ed]

Saving Journalism in the Information Age

Author: Philip Meyer

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN: 082621858X

Category: History

Page: 245

View: 1709

"In this edition, Meyer's analysis of the correlation between newspaper quality and profitability is updated and applied to recent developments in the newspaper industry. Meyer argues that understanding the relationship between quality and profit is central to sustaining journalistic excellence and preserving journalism's unique social functions." -- Provided by the publisher.