Chicago and the Illinois Central Railroad

Author: Clifford J. Downey

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738550749

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 6821

Headquartered in Chicago, the Illinois Central Railroad was known as the "Main Line of Mid-America," as it was a major railroad cutting through the middle section of the United States with two major routes: the Main Line, which ran south out of Chicago toward New Orleans, and the Western Lines, which ran west toward Iowa. The Illinois Central Railroad had eight major freight yards in Chicago, which in 1937 handled nearly two million freight cars. It was also well known for its passenger service and operated some of the finest passenger trains: the Green Diamond, the all-Pullman Panama Limited, and the City of New Orleans. Chicago and the Illinois Central Railroad covers the railroad's operations within the city of Chicago, plus the outlying suburbs, from the late 1800s to 1960. It explores, through vintage photographs, the passenger and freight trains, suburban trains, locomotives, shops and repair facilities, and people that made the railroad function.

Kentucky and the Illinois Central Railroad

Author: Clifford J. Downey

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738566610

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 6139

The Illinois Central Railroad (ICRR) operated approximately 600 miles of mainline track throughout the Commonwealth of Kentucky, stretching from the Mississippi River to the central part of the state. In addition to Louisville, the state's largest city, the ICRR also served dozens of small towns. Kentucky's economy was built around coal mining and farming, and the ICRR played a major role in both industries. ICRR's coal trains served as a conveyor for Kentucky coal moving to Midwest factories, and the road hauled a wide variety of agricultural products, including tobacco, grain, and fresh fruit. No mention of the ICRR would be complete without discussing the fleet of fast passenger trains that whisked Kentucky residents to and from distant cities. To maintain the locomotives that hauled all these trains the ICRR operated one of the nation's largest locomotive repair shops in Paducah.

Illinois Central Railroad: Wrecks, Derailments, and Floods

Author: Clifford J. Downey

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1467115991

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 942

With roots dating back to 1851, the Illinois Central Railroad (IC) transported millions of passengers and countless tons of freight. Most trips were completed without incident. However, there were occasional mishaps, including derailments and collisions with other trains or highway vehicles. Most accidents were minor, while others made the national news, such as the October 30, 1972, collision of two commuter trains in Chicago that killed 45 passengers. The IC frequently had to deal with flooding, for the railroad ran in close proximity to several major rivers. In January and February 1937, much of the southern half of the railroad was shut down because of flooding on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. This book depicts many of the accidents that have taken place along the Illinois Central through the years. The photographs are drawn from numerous sources, including the railroad's own photographers, amateur photographers, and photography studios.

Railroader

The Unfiltered Genius and Controversy of Four-Time CEO Hunter Harrison

Author: Howard Green

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781989025048

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 8946

Hunter Harrison, the revolutionary railroader from Memphis, dramatically turned four publicly traded companies into cash machines. Starting as a laborer when he was a wayward teenager, Harrison spent a half century in the rail business and nearly two decades running Illinois Central, Canadian National, Canadian Pacific, and CSX. Never accepting the status quo, Harrison not only renovated established railroads, he forced an industry to shape up. As the pre-eminent proponent of Precision Scheduled Railroading, Harrison created approximately $50 billion in shareholder value. Charming, profane, and not afraid to make enemies, the no-bullshit CEO let nothing get in his way. At the same time, he was a talent scout and coach to thousands, and a devoted father and husband for more than fifty years. Railroader offers insights into running all businesses. Howard Green's unauthorized, highly personal biography is deeply researched, based on conversations with Harrison over several years. It also includes candid stories from Harrison's family and colleagues--those who admired him and those who criticized him. Green's access and decades of experience give him the unparalleled ability to tell the story of this uncompromising leader who both inspired and infuriated.

The Chicago Great Western Railway

Author: David J. Fiore

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738540481

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 2107

The Chicago Great Western Railway (CGW) was a Midwestern line that operated in Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, Minnesota, Kansas, and Nebraska for 83 years. This book provides nostalgic images and photographs of the operations, employees, locomotives, and stations of a little railroad that is now only a memory.

Nature's Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West

Author: William Cronon

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393072452

Category: History

Page: 592

View: 6619

A Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and Winner of the Bancroft Prize. "No one has written a better book about a city…Nature's Metropolis is elegant testimony to the proposition that economic, urban, environmental, and business history can be as graceful, powerful, and fascinating as a novel." —Kenneth T. Jackson, Boston Globe In this groundbreaking work, William Cronon gives us an environmental perspective on the history of nineteenth-century America. By exploring the ecological and economic changes that made Chicago America's most dynamic city and the Great West its hinterland, Mr. Cronon opens a new window onto our national past. This is the story of city and country becoming ever more tightly bound in a system so powerful that it reshaped the American landscape and transformed American culture. The world that emerged is our own. Winner of the Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize

Lincoln's Greatest Case: The River, the Bridge, and the Making of America

Author: Brian McGinty

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 087140785X

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 5065

The untold story of how one sensational trial propelled a self-taught lawyer and a future president into the national spotlight. In May of 1856, the steamboat Effie Afton barreled into a pillar of the Rock Island Bridge, unalterably changing the course of American transportation history. Within a year, long-simmering tensions between powerful steamboat interests and burgeoning railroads exploded, and the nation’s attention, absorbed by the Dred Scott case, was riveted by a new civil trial. Dramatically reenacting the Effie Afton case—from its unlikely inception, complete with a young Abraham Lincoln’s soaring oratory, to the controversial finale—this “masterful” (Christian Science Monitor) account gives us the previously untold story of how one sensational trial propelled a self-taught lawyer and a future president into the national spotlight.

Illinois Central

Main Line of Mid-America: All-color photography of the largest north-south railroad in the United States

Author: Donald J. Heimburger

Publisher: Heimburger House Publishing Company

ISBN: 9780911581355

Category: Transportation

Page: 128

View: 6450

All-color book on the largest north-south railroad in the U.S.! Filled with 350 color photos, and featuring easy-to-see 10 x 11" size! Illinois Central: Main Line of Mid-America is a spectacular display of all-color photos of the first land grant railroad. This 10x11" 128-page hardbound book features a laminated cover and is bursting with beautiful photos of steam locomotives beginning with the 2-4-4T, the 0-6-0 and 0-8-0 switchers, the 2-8-2 Mikado workhorses, the 4-8-2 heavy haulers, and some odd locomotives such as the 0-8-2 and 0-10-0s, as well as many others. This exciting book also features diesels including switchers, black and white Geeps, beautiful orange, brown and yellow E passenger units, and the later model GP-20s and GP-35s. Coaches, diners, business cars and Pullman sleepers comprise the fine IC passenger equipment. Also included is suburban electric equipment from both the old era of the Pullman olive-green days and the sleek new bi-level cars. Scenes from on-line towns such as Chicago, St. Louis, Paducah, Clinton, Dubuque, Central City and Centralia are highlighted in a special section called “on the Property.” The glossy enameled text paper of this large format book provides excellent reproduction.

The Iron Road in the Prairie State

The Story of Illinois Railroading

Author: Simon Cordery

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253019125

Category: Transportation

Page: 240

View: 3225

In 1836, Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas agreed on one thing: Illinois needed railroads. Over the next fifty years, the state became the nation’s railroad hub, with Chicago at its center. Speculators, greed, growth, and regulation followed as the railroad industry consumed unprecedented amounts of capital and labor. A nationwide market resulted, and the Windy City became the site of opportunities and challenges that remain to this day. In this first-of-its-kind history, full of entertaining anecdotes and colorful characters, Simon Cordery describes the explosive growth of Illinois railroads and its impact on America. Cordery shows how railroading in Illinois influenced railroad financing, the creation of a national economy, and government regulation of business. Cordery's masterful chronicle of rail development in Illinois from 1837 to 2010 reveals how the state’s expanding railroads became the foundation of the nation’s rail network.

Chicago Stations & Trains Photo Archive

Author: John Kelly

Publisher: Enthusiast Books

ISBN: 9781583882160

Category: Transportation

Page: 128

View: 5743

No other American city had such a fascinating group of railroad passenger stations as Chicago. This book highlights Chicago's six major railroad stations and the trains that served them. Included are Dearborn Station, Grand Central Station, Central Station, La Salle Street Station, North Western Station, and Union Station. During the heyday of passenger trains, Chicago was the undisputed rail center of the United States and its railroad stations were the gates to everywhere. Chicago's railroad stations featured superb architecture with marble floors and staircases, while restaurants, newsstands and shops filled the concourse areas. Steel latticework beams helped support glass-domed roofs and public address systems echoed train information throughout the high-ceiling stations. Huge station clocks loomed above the brass and neon train bulletin boards that listed "On Time" trains. Beyond the boarding gates, the constant parade of trains sounded with clanging bells and rumbling steel wheels. Historic photographs feature name trains like Super Chief, Capitol Limited, 20th Century Limited, Broadway Limited, California Zephyr, Hiawatha, 400, and City of Denver. Included are maps, station drawings, timetables and promotional advertising.

History of the Illinois Central Railroad Company and Representative Employes

A History of the Growth and Development of One of the Leading Arteries of Transportation in the United States, from Inception to Its Present Mammoth Proportions, Together with the Biographies of Many of the Men who Have Been and are Identified with the Varied Interests of the Illinois Central Railroad

Author: Railroad Historical Company

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 802

View: 1870

ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD ITS

Author: D. a. (David Augustus) 1793-1861 Neal,Lawrence J Gutter Collection of Chicago

Publisher: Wentworth Press

ISBN: 9781362922810

Category: History

Page: 34

View: 5127

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Chicago's South Shore

Author: Charles Celander

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738503455

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 1929

Chicago's South Shore has a mature, urban nature that disguises its evolution from marshland to farmland, and from suburb to city neighborhood. Located between Jackson Park and Seventy-ninth Street, and from Lake Michigan to Stony Island, the marshland of the 1800s was first settled by German and Scandinavian truck and flower farmers. Beginning in the 1890s, the Illinois Central Railroad Electric Line expanded into what was largely undeveloped farmland, setting the stage for one hundred years of development and demographic change. From Hyde Park to Jeffery Manor and South Chicago, the pictures contained in Chicago's South Shore show many of the faces, places, and events that marked the evolution of the area. German, Swedish, Irish, and African-American families are just a fraction of the many groups who have called South Shore home. Today, largely through the redevelopment efforts of South Shore Bank, the neighborhood promises to build on its glorious past and play a vital role in Chicago's future.

Railroaded: The Transcontinentals and the Making of Modern America

Author: Richard White

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393082601

Category: History

Page: 660

View: 3465

"A powerful book, crowded with telling details and shrewd observations." —Michael Kazin, New York Times Book Review This original, deeply researched history shows the transcontinentals to be pivotal actors in the making of modern America. But the triumphal myths of the golden spike, robber barons larger than life, and an innovative capitalism all die here. Instead we have a new vision of the Gilded Age, often darkly funny, that shows history to be rooted in failure as well as success.

Chicago & Western Indiana Railroad

Author: Cynthia L. Ogorek,Bill Molony

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 143965719X

Category: Transportation

Page: 128

View: 7490

The Chicago & Western Indiana Railroad was a short line running 16 miles from downtown Chicago to Dolton, Illinois, the first suburb south of Chicago, with another line running southeast from Eighty-First Street to the Indiana state line. Built in the 1880s, it was owned by five trunk line railroads that used it as an efficient and inexpensive route into downtown Chicago. Like many 19th-century railroads, the C&WI reached its traffic peak in the middle of the 20th century. After World War II, passenger travel and shipping moved to airlines and over-the-road trucking. The need for rail access into downtown Chicago declined, and the C&WI ended its service in 1994.

The Fuller Court

Justices, Rulings, and Legacy

Author: James W. Ely

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1576077144

Category: Law

Page: 318

View: 1086

Explores the era, justices, key events, and decisions in landmark Supreme Court cases under Chief Justice Melville W. Fuller, including the creation of the Sherman Act, and the Pure Food and Drug Act.

The Filth of Progress

Immigrants, Americans, and the Building of Canals and Railroads in the West

Author: Ryan Dearinger

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520960378

Category: History

Page: 284

View: 8612

The Filth of Progress explores the untold side of a well-known American story. For more than a century, accounts of progress in the West foregrounded the technological feats performed while canals and railroads were built and lionized the capitalists who financed the projects. This book salvages stories often omitted from the triumphant narrative of progress by focusing on the suffering and survival of the workers who were treated as outsiders. Ryan Dearinger examines the moving frontiers of canal and railroad construction workers in the tumultuous years of American expansion, from the completion of the Erie Canal in 1825 to the joining of the Central Pacific and Union Pacific railroads in 1869. He tells the story of the immigrants and Americans—the Irish, Chinese, Mormons, and native-born citizens—whose labor created the West’s infrastructure and turned the nation’s dreams of a continental empire into a reality. Dearinger reveals that canals and railroads were not static monuments to progress but moving spaces of conflict and contestation.