Citizenship and Nationhood in France and Germany

Author: Rogers BRUBAKER

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674028945

Category: History

Page: 284

View: 2866

"The difference between French and German definitions of citizenship is instructive - and, for millions of immigrants from North Africa, Turkey, and Eastern Europe, decisive. Rogers Brubaker shows how this difference - between the territorial basis of the French citizenry and the German emphasis on blood descent - was shaped and sustained by sharply differing understandings of nationhood, rooted in distinctive French and German paths to nation-statehood". --Publisher.

Citizenship and Nationhood in France and Germany

Author: Rogers BRUBAKER

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674131781

Category: History

Page: 270

View: 4997

We live in a world bounded and defined by the legal institution of citizenship. The plight of immigrants moving across Western Europe has made this a particularly salient point, one frequently missed but finally brought into sharp focus here. Linking law, state, economy, and culture across two countries and centuries, this book offers a powerful explanation of forces that shape the modern world and delineate its future.

Nationalism Reframed

Nationhood and the National Question in the New Europe

Author: Rogers Brubaker

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521576499

Category: Political Science

Page: 202

View: 2956

Nationalism Reframed is a theoretically and historically informed study of nationalism in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Rogers Brubaker develops an original account of the interlocking and opposed nationalisms of national minorities, the nationalizing states in which they live, and the external national homelands to which they are linked by external ties. He then analyzes contemporary nationalisms in historical and comparative perspective, tracing the parallels between the Eastern European nationalisms of today and those of the interwar period.

Citizenship and Immigration

Author: Christian Joppke

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0745658393

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 2885

This incisive book provides a succinct overview of the new academic field of citizenship and immigration, as well as presenting a fresh and original argument about changing citizenship in our contemporary human rights era. Instead of being nationally resilient or in “postnational” decline, citizenship in Western states has continued to evolve, converging on a liberal model of inclusive citizenship with diminished rights implications and increasingly universalistic identities. This convergence is demonstrated through a sustained comparison of developments in North America, Western Europe and Australia. Topics covered in the book include: recent trends in nationality laws; what ethnic diversity does to the welfare state; the decline of multiculturalism accompanied by the continuing rise of antidiscrimination policies; and the new state campaigns to “upgrade” citizenship in the post-2001 period. Sophisticated and informative, and written in a lively and accessible style, this book will appeal to upper-level students and scholars in sociology, political science, and immigration and citizenship studies.

How to Be French

Nationality in the Making since 1789

Author: Patrick Weil

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822389479

Category: History

Page: 452

View: 1580

How to Be French is a magisterial history of French nationality law from 1789 to the present, written by Patrick Weil, one of France’s foremost historians. First published in France in 2002, it is filled with captivating human dramas, with legal professionals, and with statesmen including La Fayette, Napoleon, Clemenceau, de Gaulle, and Chirac. France has long pioneered nationality policies. It was France that first made the parent’s nationality the child’s birthright, regardless of whether the child is born on national soil, and France has changed its nationality laws more often and more significantly than any other modern democratic nation. Focusing on the political and legal confrontations that policies governing French nationality have continually evoked and the laws that have resulted, Weil teases out the rationales of lawmakers and jurists. In so doing, he definitively separates nationality from national identity. He demonstrates that nationality laws are written not to realize lofty conceptions of the nation but to address specific issues such as the autonomy of the individual in relation to the state or a sudden decline in population. Throughout How to Be French, Weil compares French laws to those of other countries, including the United States, Great Britain, and Germany, showing how France both borrowed from and influenced other nations’ legislation. Examining moments when a racist approach to nationality policy held sway, Weil brings to light the Vichy regime’s denaturalization of thousands of citizens, primarily Jews and anti-fascist exiles, and late-twentieth-century efforts to deny North African immigrants and their children access to French nationality. He also reveals stark gender inequities in nationality policy, including the fact that until 1927 French women lost their citizenship by marrying foreign men. More than the first complete, systematic study of the evolution of French nationality policy, How to be French is a major contribution to the broader study of nationality.

Limits of Citizenship

Migrants and Postnational Membership in Europe

Author: Yasemin Nuhoglu Soysal

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226768427

Category: Political Science

Page: 244

View: 4317

3. Explaining incorporation regimes

Becoming a Citizen

Incorporating Immigrants and Refugees in the United States and Canada

Author: Irene Bloemraad

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520248996

Category: History

Page: 369

View: 6084

"Becoming a Citizen is a terrific book. Important, innovative, well argued, theoretically significant, and empirically grounded. It will be the definitive work in the field for years to come."—Frank D. Bean, Co-Director, Center for Research on Immigration, Population and Public Policy "This book is in three ways innovative. First, it avoids the domestic navel-gazing of U.S .immigration studies, through an obvious yet ingenious comparison with Canada. Second, it shows that official multiculturalism and common citizenship may very well go together, revealing Canada, and not the United States, as leader in successful immigrant integration. Thirdly, the book provides a compelling picture of how the state matters in making immigrants citizens. An outstanding contribution to the migration and citizenship literature!"—Christian Joppke, American University of Paris

States Without Nations

Citizenship for Mortals

Author: Jacqueline Stevens

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231148771

Category: Philosophy

Page: 364

View: 6150

As citizens, we hold certain truths to be self-evident: that the rights to own land, marry, inherit property, and especially to assume birthright citizenship should be guaranteed by the state. The laws promoting these rights appear not only to preserve our liberty but to guarantee society remains just. Yet considering how much violence and inequality results from these legal mandates, Jacqueline Stevens asks whether we might be making the wrong assumptions. Would a world without such laws be more just? Arguing that the core laws of the nation-state are more about a fear of death than a desire for freedom, Jacqueline Stevens imagines a world in which birthright citizenship, family inheritance, state-sanctioned marriage, and private land ownership are eliminated. Would chaos be the result? Drawing on political theory and history and incorporating contemporary social and economic data, she brilliantly critiques our sentimental attachments to birthright citizenship, inheritance, and marriage and highlights their harmful outcomes, including war, global apartheid, destitution, family misery, and environmental damage. It might be hard to imagine countries without the rules of membership and ownership that have come to define them, but as Stevens shows, conjuring new ways of reconciling our laws with the condition of mortality reveals the flaws of our present institutions and inspires hope for moving beyond them.

Eurostars and Eurocities

Free Movement and Mobility in an Integrating Europe

Author: Adrian Favell

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444399373

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 9080

Eurostars and Eurocities: Free Movement and Mobility in an Integrating Europe examines intra-European Union migration in the cities of Amsterdam, London and Brussels. Based on sixty in-depth interviews of free moving European citizens, and more than five years of ethnographic and documentary research, it uncovers the rarely studied human dimension of European integration Examines the mobility, lifestyle and career opportunities created by the borderless society of the European Union, as well as the barriers that still persist Analyses the new migration trends, challenges to the welfare state, and forms of urban cosmopolitanism linked to processes of European integration

Ethnic Minority Migrants in Britain and France

Integration Trade-Offs

Author: Rahsaan Maxwell

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107378036

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 2664

This book addresses why some ethnic minority migrant groups have better economic and political integration outcomes than others. The central claim is that social integration leads to trade-offs with economic and political integration. The logic behind this claim is that socially segregated groups may have difficulties interacting with mainstream society but will have more capacity for group mobilization. That mobilization can improve economic and political integration. In comparison, socially integrated groups may have greater capacity to interact with mainstream society but also less likelihood of developing significant group mobilization resources. As a result, this can limit their economic and political integration outcomes. Rahsaan Maxwell develops this argument with evidence from Britain and France, claiming that similar group-level dynamics exist despite numerous national-level contextual differences, and provides a brief extension of the argument to The Netherlands and the United States.

Grounds for Difference

Author: Rogers Brubaker

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674425316

Category: Social Science

Page: 235

View: 9588

Offering fresh perspectives on perennial questions of ethnicity, race, nationalism, and religion, Rogers Brubaker analyzes three forces that shape the politics of diversity and multiculturalism today: inequality as a public concern, biology as an asserted basis of racial and ethnic difference, and religion as a key terrain of public contestation.

Challenging Ethnic Citizenship

German and Israeli Perspectives on Immigration

Author: Daniel Levy,Yfaat Weiss

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781571812919

Category: Political Science

Page: 282

View: 5837

Includes statistics.

Regimes of Ethnicity and Nationhood in Germany, Russia, and Turkey

Author: Şener Aktürk

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139851691

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 4827

Akturk discusses how the definition of being German, Soviet, Russian and Turkish radically changed at the turn of the twenty-first century. Germany's ethnic citizenship law, the Soviet Union's inscription of ethnic origins in personal identification documents and Turkey's prohibition on the public use of minority languages, all implemented during the early twentieth century, underpinned the definition of nationhood in these countries. Despite many challenges from political and societal actors, these policies did not change for many decades, until around the turn of the twenty-first century, when Russia removed ethnicity from the internal passport, Germany changed its citizenship law and Turkish public television began broadcasting in minority languages. Using a new typology of 'regimes of ethnicity' and a close study of primary documents and numerous interviews, Sener Akturk argues that the coincidence of three key factors – counterelites, new discourses and hegemonic majorities – explains successful change in state policies toward ethnicity.

For Kin or Country

Xenophobia, Nationalism, and War

Author: Stephen M. Saideman,R. William Ayres

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231514492

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 1743

The collapse of an empire can result in the division of families and the redrawing of geographical boundaries. New leaders promise the return of people and territories that may have been lost in the past, often advocating aggressive foreign policies that can result in costly and devastating wars. The final years of the Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman empires, the end of European colonization in Africa and Asia, and the demise of the Soviet Union were all accompanied by war and atrocity. These efforts to reunite lost kin are known as irredentism—territorial claims based on shared ethnic ties made by one state to a minority population residing within another state. For Kin or Country explores this phenomenon, investigating why the collapse of communism prompted more violence in some instances and less violence in others. Despite the tremendous political and economic difficulties facing all former communist states during their transition to a market democracy, only Armenia, Croatia, and Serbia tried to upset existing boundaries. Hungary, Romania, and Russia practiced much more restraint. The authors examine various explanations for the causes of irredentism and for the pursuit of less antagonistic policies, including the efforts by Western Europe to tame Eastern Europe. Ultimately, the authors find that internal forces drive irredentist policy even at the risk of a country's self-destruction and that xenophobia may have actually worked to stabilize many postcommunist states in Eastern Europe. Events in Russia and Eastern Europe in 2014 have again brought irredentism into the headlines. In a new Introduction, the authors address some of the events and dynamics that have developed since the original version of the book was published. By focusing on how nationalist identity interact with the interests of politicians, For Kin or Country explains why some states engage in aggressive irredentism and when others forgo those opportunities that is as relevant to Russia and Ukraine in 2014 as it was for Serbia, Croatia, and Armenia in the 1990s.

Why Muslim Integration Fails in Christian-Heritage Societies

Author: Claire L. Adida,David D. Laitin,Marie-Anne Valfort

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674504925

Category: Political Science

Page: 264

View: 6370

Amid fears of Islamic extremism, many Europeans ask whether Muslim immigrants can integrate into historically Christian countries. Why Muslim Integration Fails in Christian-Heritage Societies explores this question and concludes that both Muslim and non-Muslim French must share responsibility for the slow progress of integration.

The Position of the Turkish and Moroccan Second Generation in Amsterdam and Rotterdam

The TIES Study in the Netherlands

Author: Maurice Crul,Liesbeth Heering

Publisher: Amsterdam University Press

ISBN: 9089640614

Category: Social Science

Page: 188

View: 4533

Annotation. The Dutch second generation of Turkish and Moroccan origin is coming of age and making a transition from education to the labour market. This first publication of the TIES Project (Towards the Integration of the European Second Generation) studies the social situation and views of this ethnic group, drawing on the research carried out in Amsterdam and Rotterdam in 2006-07 among the Dutch-born children of immigrants from Turkey and Morocco and a comparison group of young people (age 18-35) whose parents were born in the Netherlands. This title can be previewed in Google Books - http://books.google.com/books?vid=ISBN9789089640611. This title is available in the OAPEN Library - http://www.oapen.org.

Power and the Nation in European History

Author: Len Scales,Oliver Zimmer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139444729

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 7968

Few would doubt the central importance of the nation in the making and unmaking of modern political communities. The long history of 'the nation' as a concept and as a name for various sorts of 'imagined community' likewise commands such acceptance. But when did the nation first become a fundamental political factor? This is a question which has been, and continues to be, far more sharply contested. A deep rift still separates 'modernist' perspectives, which view the political nation as a phenomenon limited to modern, industrialised societies, from the views of scholars concerned with the pre-industrial world who insist, often vehemently, that nations were central to pre-modern political life also. This 2005 book engages with these questions by drawing on the expertise of leading medieval, early modern and modern historians.

The Sociology of the State

Author: Bertrand Badie,Pierre Birnbaum

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226035499

Category: Social Science

Page: 171

View: 6377

Too often we think of the modern political state as a universal institution, the inevitable product of History rather than a specific creation of a very particular history. Bertrand Badie and Pierre Birnbaum here persuasively argue that the origin of the state is a social fact, arising out of the peculiar sociohistorical context of Western Europe. Drawing on historical materials and bringing sociological insights to bear on a field long abandoned to jurists and political scientists, the authors lay the foundations for a strikingly original theory of the birth and subsequent diffusion of the state. The book opens with a review of the principal evolutionary theories concerning the origin of the institution proposed by such thinkers as Marx, Durkheim, and Weber. Rejecting these views, the authors set forward and defend their thesis that the state was an "invention" rather than a necessary consequence of any other process. Once invented, the state was disseminated outside its Western European birthplace either through imposition or imitation. The study concludes with concrete analyses of the differences in actual state institutions in France, Prussia, Great Britain, the United States, and Switzerland.

Jewish Emancipation Reconsidered

The French and German Models

Author: Michael Brenner,Vicki Caron,Uri R. Kaufmann

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 9783161480188

Category: History

Page: 245

View: 582

A group of distinguished historians makes the first systematic attempt to compare the experiences of French and German Jews in the modern era. The cases of France and Germany have often been depicted as the dominant paradigms for understanding the processes of Jewish emancipation and acculturation in Western and Central Europe. In the French case, emancipation was achieved during the French Revolution, and it remained in place until 1940, when the Vichy regime came to power. In Germany, emancipation was a far more gradual and piecemeal process, and even after it was achieved in 1871, popular and governmental antisemitism persisted. The essays in this volume, while buttressing many traditional assumptions regarding these two paths of emancipation, simultaneously challenge many others, and thus force us to reconsider the larger processes of Jewish integration and acculturation.