Communicating Rocks

Writing, Speaking, and Thinking about Geology

Author: Peter Copeland

Publisher: Prentice Hall

ISBN: 9780321689672

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 149

View: 4089

Scientific endeavor begins with asking questions about the nature of the world around us and gathering data, but this work cannot be complete without effectively communicating the conclusions and data found. Communicating Rocks: Writing, Speaking, and Thinking about Geology not only makes the case for balancing science with writing and speaking, but makes the case that one cannot have the former without the latter. Instruction concerning the rules and styles of writing and speaking are addressed in relation to technical concerns specific to the Earth sciences, illustrating the importance of effective communication in geologic investigations. The book includes guidance on how to write an effective research paper, and the creation of PowerPoints, posters, a thesis, funding proposals, and more is covered in detail.

Well Logging for Earth Scientists

Author: Darwin V. Ellis,Julian M. Singer

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1402037384

Category: Science

Page: 708

View: 332

The first edition of this book demystified the process of well log analysis for students, researchers and practitioners. In the two decades since, the industry has changed enormously: technical staffs are smaller, and hydrocarbons are harder to locate, quantify, and produce. New drilling techniques have engendered new measurement devices incorporated into the drilling string. Corporate restructuring and the "graying" of the workforce have caused a scarcity in technical competence involved in the search and exploitation of petroleum. The updated 2nd Edition reviews logging measurement technology developed in the last twenty years, and expands the petrophysical applications of the measurements.

Over the Mountains

An Aerial View of Geology

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781931414180

Category: Photography

Page: 127

View: 9940

Explores the geological forces that shape the landscape of planet Earth, with detailed, full-color, large-format photographs that cover the geology and features of every major mountain range in the United States, as well as easy-to-understand explanations of the processes at work.

Scientific Thinking in Speech and Language Therapy

Author: Carmel Lum

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 1135641560

Category: Education

Page: 288

View: 3649

Speech and language pathologists, like all professionals who claim to be scientific in their practice, make a public commitment to operate on the basis of knowledge derived in accordance with sound scientific standards. Yet students in communication disorders are given relatively little grounding in the fundamentals of science; indeed, they often receive implicit encouragement to rely on clinical wisdom. This pathbreaking text introduces the principles of critical scientific thinking as they relate to assessing communication problems, deciding about alternative approaches to intervention, and evaluating outcomes. The author provides many illustrative examples to help readers contextualize the ideas. Her clear presentation will help not only undergraduate and graduate students but also established professionals reason more effectively about what they are doing and why. Though the examples come from speech and language pathology, this illuminating and readable book constitutes a valuable resource for all clinical practitioners.

The Rocks

Author: Peter Nichols

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101983396

Category: Fiction

Page: 432

View: 2410

Set against dramatic Mediterranean Sea views and lush olive groves, "The Rocks" opens with a confrontation and a secret: what was the mysterious, catastrophic event that drove two honeymooners apart so suddenly and absolutely in 1948 that they never spoke again despite living on the same island for sixty more years? And how did their history shape the Romeo and Juliet-like romance of their (unrelated) children decades later? Centered around a popular seaside resort club and its community, this is a double love story that begins with a mystery, then moves backward in time, era by era, to unravel what really happened decades earlier.

Geology Underfoot in Yosemite National Park

Author: Allen F. Glazner,Greg M. Stock

Publisher: Mountain Press

ISBN: 9780878425686

Category: Science

Page: 299

View: 5730

This volume will help readers read the Yosemite National Park's landscape the way a geologist does. The authors tell the park's history and describe the origins of its hundreds of little known but surprisingly accessible features. They illustrate it all with illuminating color photographs, maps and clear diagrams. Readers will discover things like why many of Yosemite's domes shed rock shells like onion layers, what happens when a volcano erupts under a glacial lake, and why rocks seem to be almost continually tumbling from the region's cliffs.

Why Geology Matters

Decoding the Past, Anticipating the Future

Author: Doug Macdougall

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520948920

Category: Science

Page: 304

View: 3213

Volcanic dust, climate change, tsunamis, earthquakes—geoscience explores phenomena that profoundly affect our lives. But more than that, as Doug Macdougall makes clear, the science also provides important clues to the future of the planet. In an entertaining and accessibly written narrative, Macdougall gives an overview of Earth’s astonishing history based on information extracted from rocks, ice cores, and other natural archives. He explores such questions as: What is the risk of an asteroid striking Earth? Why does the temperature of the ocean millions of years ago matter today? How are efforts to predict earthquakes progressing? Macdougall also explains the legacy of greenhouse gases from Earth’s past and shows how that legacy shapes our understanding of today’s human-caused climate change. We find that geoscience in fact illuminates many of today’s most pressing issues—the availability of energy, access to fresh water, sustainable agriculture, maintaining biodiversity—and we discover how, by applying new technologies and ideas, we can use it to prepare for the future.

A Geology of Media

Author: Jussi Parikka

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780816695515

Category: Philosophy

Page: 224

View: 8288

Media history is millions, even billions, of years old. That is the premise of this pioneering and provocative book, which argues that to adequately understand contemporary media culture we must set out from material realities that precede media themselves--Earth's history, geological formations, minerals, and energy. And to do so, writes Jussi Parikka, is to confront the profound environmental and social implications of this ubiquitous, but hardly ephemeral, realm of modern-day life. Exploring the resource depletion and material resourcing required for us to use our devices to live networked lives, Parikka grounds his analysis in Siegfried Zielinski's widely discussed notion of deep time--but takes it back millennia. Not only are rare earth minerals and many other materials needed to make our digital media machines work, he observes, but used and obsolete media technologies return to the earth as residue of digital culture, contributing to growing layers of toxic waste for future archaeologists to ponder. He shows that these materials must be considered alongside the often dangerous and exploitative labor processes that refine them into the devices underlying our seemingly virtual or immaterial practices. A Geology of Media demonstrates that the environment does not just surround our media cultural world--it runs through it, enables it, and hosts it in an era of unprecedented climate change. While looking backward to Earth's distant past, it also looks forward to a more expansive media theory--and, implicitly, media activism--to come.

Barren Lands

An Epic Search for Diamonds in the North America Arctic

Author: Kevin Krajick

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 150402916X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 460

View: 7383

First published in 2001, Barren Lands is the classic true story of the men who sought—and found—a great diamond mine on the last frontier of the far north. From a bloody 18th-century trek across the Canadian tundra to the daunting natural forces facing protagonists Chuck Fipke and Stewart Blusson as they struggle against the mighty DeBeers cartel, this is the definitive account of one of the world’s great mineral discoveries. Combining geology, science history, raw nature, and high intrigue, it is also a tale of supreme adventure, taking the reader into a magical—and now fast-vanishing—wild landscape. Now in a newly revised and updated edition.

Roadside Geology of Hawaiʻi

Author: Richard W. Hazlett,Donald W. Hyndman

Publisher: Mountain Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Science

Page: 307

View: 3410

Roadside Geology of Hawai`i details the evolution of this volcanic island chain, from the origin of a hot spot and the tumultuous creation of each island to ongoing eruptions and the gradual death and erosion of old volcanoes. Residents and tourists alike

Cairns

Messengers in Stone

Author: David B. Williams

Publisher: Mountaineers Books

ISBN: 1594856826

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 192

View: 4018

Download the first section from Cairns now. (Provide us with a little information and we'll send the free section directly to your inbox!) Praise for author David B. Williams: “Makes stones sing” --Kirkus Reviews “Williams’s lively mixture of hard science and piquant lore is sure to fire the readers’ curiosity” --Publisher’s Weekly *Part history, part folklore, part geology * Features charming black-and-white illustrations From meadow trails to airy mountaintops and wide open desert, cairns -- those seemingly random stacks of rocks -- are surprisingly rich in stories and meaning. For thousands of years cairns have been used by people to connect to the landscape and communicate with others, and are often an essential guide to travelers. Cairns, manmade rock piles can indicate a trail, mark a grave, serve as an altar or shrine, reveal property boundaries or sacred hunting grounds, and even predict astronomical activity. The Inuit have more than two dozen terms to describe cairns and their uses! In Cairns: Messengers in Stone, geologist and acclaimed nature writer David B. Williams (Stories in Stone: Travels through Urban Geology) explores the history of cairns from the moors of Scotland to the peaks of the Himalaya -- where they come from, what they mean, why they’re used, how to make cairns, and more. Cairns are so much more than a random pile of rocks, knowing how to make cairns can drastically alter the meaning of the formation. Hikers, climbers, travelers, gardeners, and nature buffs alike will delight in this quirky, captivating collection of stories about cairns.

Sharing Books, Talking Science

Exploring Scientific Concepts with Children's Literature

Author: Valerie Bang-Jensen,Lester L. Laminack,Mark Lubkowitz

Publisher: Heinemann Educational Books

ISBN: 9780325087740

Category: Education

Page: 152

View: 1478

Science is everywhere, in everything we do, see, and read. Books-all books-offer possibilities for talk about science in the illustrations and text once you know how to look for them. Children's literature is a natural avenue to explore the seven crosscutting concepts described in the Next Generation Science Standards*, and with guidance from Valerie Bang-Jensen and Mark Lubkowitz, you will learn to develop the mindset necessary to think like a scientist, and then help your students think, talk, and read like scientists. Sharing Books Talking Science is an engaging and user-friendly guide that provides practical, real world understandings of complex scientific concepts using children's literature. By demonstrating how to work in a very familiar and comfortable teaching context-read aloud-to address what may be less familiar and comfortable content-scientific concepts-Valerie and Mark empower teachers to use just about any book in their classroom to help deepen students' understanding of the world. Valerie and Mark supply you with everything you need to know to get to the heart of each concept, including a primer, questions and strategies to spot a concept, and ways to prompt students to see and talk about it. Each chapter offers a list of suggested titles (many of which you probably already have) to help you get started right away, as well as "topic spotlight" sections that help you connect the concepts to familiar topics such as eating, seasons, bridges, size, and water. With Sharing Books Talking Science, you will have the tools and confidence to explore scientific concepts with your students. Learn how to "talk science" with any book so that you can infuse your curriculum with scientific thinking...even when you aren't teaching science. *Next Generation Science Standards is a registered trademark of Achieve. Neither Achieve nor the lead states and partners that developed the Next Generation Science Standards were involved in the production of this product, and do not endorse it.

The Chicago Guide to Communicating Science

Second Edition

Author: Scott L. Montgomery

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022614450X

Category: Reference

Page: 312

View: 2297

This book is a comprehensive guide to scientific communication that has been used widely in courses and workshops as well as by individual scientists and other professionals since its first publication in 2002. This revision accounts for the many ways in which the globalization of research and the changing media landscape have altered scientific communication over the past decade. With an increased focus throughout on how research is communicated in industry, government, and non-profit centers as well as in academia, it now covers such topics as the opportunities and perils of online publishing, the need for translation skills, and the communication of scientific findings to the broader world, both directly through speaking and writing and through the filter of traditional and social media. It also offers advice for those whose research concerns controversial issues, such as climate change and emerging viruses, in which clear and accurate communication is especially critical to the scientific community and the wider world.

Carving Grand Canyon

Evidence, Theories, and Mystery

Author: Wayne Ranney

Publisher: Grand Canyon Assn

ISBN: 9780938216827

Category: Science

Page: 160

View: 3317

Carving Grand Canyon provides a synopsis of the intriguing ideas and innovative theories that geologists have developed over time. This story of a fascinating landscape is told in an engaging style that nonscientists will find inviting. The story’s end, however, remains a mystery yet to be solved.

Making Thinking Visible

How to Promote Engagement, Understanding, and Independence for All Learners

Author: Ron Ritchhart,Mark Church,Karin Morrison

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118015032

Category: Education

Page: 320

View: 7557

A proven program for enhancing students' thinking and comprehension abilities Visible Thinking is a research-based approach to teaching thinking, begun at Harvard's Project Zero, that develops students' thinking dispositions, while at the same time deepening their understanding of the topics they study. Rather than a set of fixed lessons, Visible Thinking is a varied collection of practices, including thinking routines?small sets of questions or a short sequence of steps?as well as the documentation of student thinking. Using this process thinking becomes visible as the students' different viewpoints are expressed, documented, discussed and reflected upon. Helps direct student thinking and structure classroom discussion Can be applied with students at all grade levels and in all content areas Includes easy-to-implement classroom strategies The book also comes with a DVD of video clips featuring Visible Thinking in practice in different classrooms.

Assembling California

Author: John McPhee

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 9780374706029

Category: Science

Page: 303

View: 9909

At various times in a span of fifteen years, John McPhee made geological field surveys in the company of Eldridge Moores, a tectonicist at the University of California at Davis. The result of these trips is Assembling California, a cross-section in human and geologic time, from Donner Pass in the Sierra Nevada through the golden foothills of the Mother Lode and across the Great Central Valley to the wine country of the Coast Ranges, the rock of San Francisco, and the San Andreas family of faults. The two disparate time scales occasionally intersect—in the gold disruptions of the nineteenth century no less than in the earthquakes of the twentieth—and always with relevance to a newly understood geologic history in which half a dozen large and separate pieces of country are seen to have drifted in from far and near to coalesce as California. McPhee and Moores also journeyed to remote mountains of Arizona and to Cyprus and northern Greece, where rock of the deep-ocean floor has been transported into continental settings, as it has in California. Global in scope and a delight to read, Assembling California is a sweeping narrative of maps in motion, of evolving and dissolving lands.

Picnic at Hanging Rock

Author: Joan Lindsay

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0143132059

Category: Fiction

Page: 224

View: 4082

*Now a six-part TV series starring Natalie Dormer, from Amazon Prime* A 50th-anniversary edition of the landmark novel about three "gone girls" that inspired the acclaimed 1975 film, featuring a foreword by Maile Meloy, author of Do Not Become Alarmed It was a cloudless summer day in the year 1900. Everyone at Appleyard College for Young Ladies agreed it was just right for a picnic at Hanging Rock. After lunch, a group of three girls climbed into the blaze of the afternoon sun, pressing on through the scrub into the shadows of the secluded volcanic outcropping. Farther, higher, until at last they disappeared. They never returned. . . . Mysterious and subtly erotic, Picnic at Hanging Rock inspired the iconic 1975 film of the same name by Peter Weir. A beguiling landmark of Australian literature, it stands with Shirley Jackson's We Have Always Lived in the Castle, Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca, and Jeffrey Eugenides' The Virgin Suicides as a masterpiece of intrigue.

Rock Bottom

A Mystery Featuring Forensic Geologist Em Hansen

Author: Sarah Andrews

Publisher: Minotaur Books

ISBN: 1429977655

Category: Fiction

Page: 304

View: 5099

Rivers, oceans, streams, lakes—it doesn't matter what shape it takes, Em Hansen is terrified of the water. She hasn't shared her phobia with her new husband, Fritz, and when his best friend, Tiny, organizes a month-long, private, white-water rafting trip through the Grand Canyon as a wedding gift, she can't tell him how awful the trip sounds. Fritz and Tiny cobble together a party of fourteen people for the trip, but at the last minute, Tiny finds himself in the hospital and has to miss the trip. He fills his spot with George "Wink" Oberley, ostensibly a geology Ph.D. candidate at Princeton and expert river rafter, but Em immediately suspects there's more to his story. Then the rafting trip Em had been trying so hard to enjoy veers further off course than she had ever expected: Someone disappears from their party, and a dead body washes up downstream. Now it's up to Em to figure out what happened—and whether she and her husband and stepson are sharing rafts, food supplies, and tents with a murderer. Rock Bottom, the latest in Sarah Andrews's beloved Em Hansen series, will delight readers with its breathtaking scenery and riveting mystery.

Sand

Author: Marie M. Clay

Publisher: Heinemann Educational Books

ISBN: 9780435802370

Category: Education

Page: 20

View: 922

The Concepts About Print tests can be used with the new entrant or nonreader because the child is asked to help the examiner by pointing to certain features as the examiner reads the book. An Observation Survey presents the theoretical background, administration details, and scoring interpretation of the tests. Since its publication Sand has been a favorite diagnostic tool of reading teachers, and Stones was developed to provide an alternative.

Talking Across the Divide

How to Communicate with People You Disagree with and Maybe Even Change the World

Author: Justin Lee

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 052550463X

Category: Self-Help

Page: 272

View: 618

A guide to learning how to communicate with people who have diametrically opposed opinions from you, how to empathize with them, and how to (possibly) change their minds America is more polarized than ever. Whether the issue is Donald Trump, healthcare, abortion, gun control, breastfeeding, or even DC vs Marvel, it feels like you can't voice an opinion without ruffling someone's feathers. In today's digital age, it's easier than ever to build walls around yourself. You fill up your Twitter feed with voices that are angry about the same issues and believe as you believe. Before long, you're isolated in your own personalized echo chamber. And if you ever encounter someone outside of your bubble, you don't understand how the arguments that resonate so well with your peers can't get through to anyone else. In a time when every conversation quickly becomes a battlefield, it's up to us to learn how to talk to each other again. In Talking Across the Divide, social justice activist Justin Lee explains how to break through the five key barriers that make people resist differing opinions. With a combination of psychological research, pop-culture references, and anecdotes from Justin's many years of experience mediating contentious conversations, this book will help you understand people on the other side of the argument and give you the tools you need to change their minds--even if they've fallen for "fake news."