Corporations and American Democracy

Author: Naomi R. Lamoreaux,William J. Novak

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674972285

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 3200

Recent Supreme Court decisions in Citizens United and other high-profile cases have sparked disagreement about the role of corporations in American democracy. Bringing together scholars of history, law, and political science, Corporations and American Democracy provides essential grounding for today’s policy debates.

Corporations and American Democracy

Author: Naomi R. Lamoreaux,William J. Novak

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674977718

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 1669

Recent Supreme Court decisions in Citizens United and other high-profile cases have sparked disagreement about the role of corporations in American democracy. Bringing together scholars of history, law, and political science, Corporations and American Democracy provides essential grounding for today’s policy debates.

Gangs of America

The Rise of Corporate Power and the Disabling of Democracy

Author: Ted Nace

Publisher: Berrett-Koehler Publishers

ISBN: 9781576753194

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 297

View: 1200

The activist and founder of Peachpit Press reveals how the corporation has become the dominant institution in modern life, pointing to the dangers this situation holds for the planet and presenting a blueprint for restoring democracy. Reprint.

Corporations Are Not People

Why They Have More Rights Than You Do and What You Can Do About It

Author: Jeffrey D. Clements

Publisher: Berrett-Koehler Publishers

ISBN: 1609941071

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 7292

The Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision marked a culminating victory for the bizarre doctrine that corporations are people with free speech and other rights. Now, Americans cannot stop corporations from spending billions of dollars to dominate elections and keep our elected representatives on a tight leash. Jeffrey Clements reveals the far-reaching effects of this strange and destructive idea, which flies in the face of not only all common sense but most of American legal history as well. Most importantly, he offers solutions—including a constitutional amendment to reverse Citizens United—and tools to help readers join a grassroots drive to implement them. Ending corporate control of our Constitution and government is not about a triumph of one political ideology over another—it’s about restoring the republican principles of American democracy.

The Great Merger Movement in American Business, 1895-1904

Author: Naomi R. Lamoreaux

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521357654

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 224

View: 4330

Between 1895 and 1904 a great wave of mergers swept through the manufacturing sector of the United States' economy. This book explores the causes of the mergers, arguing that there was nothing natural or inevitable about turn-of-the-century combinations. Despite this conclusion, the author does not accept the view that they were necessarily a threat to competition. She shows that most of these consolidations were less efficient that the new rivals that appeared almost immediately, and they quickly lost their positions of market dominance. More over, in most of those few cases where consolidations proved to be more efficient, the nation was better off for their formation. Some exceptions occurred, however, and in these instances anti-trust policy should have had a significant role to play. Unfortunately, the peculiar division of power and authority that characterizes the Federal system of government prevented an effective policy from emerging. Ironically, anti-trust policy proved much more effective against small firms in relatively competitive industries than large firms in oligopolistic ones.

Corporations Are Not People

Reclaiming Democracy from Big Money and Global Corporations

Author: Jeffrey D. Clements

Publisher: Berrett-Koehler Publishers

ISBN: 1626562121

Category: Political Science

Page: 264

View: 9116

NEW EDITION, REVISED AND UPDATED Since the Supreme Court’s Citizens United ruling that the rights of things—money and corporations—matter more than the rights of people, America has faced a crisis of democracy. In this timely and thoroughly updated second edition, Jeff Clements describes the strange history of this bizarre ruling, its ongoing destructive effects, and the growing movement to reverse it. He includes a new chapter, “Do Something!,” showing how—state by state and community by community—Americans are using creative strategies and tools to renew democracy and curb unbalanced corporate power. Since the first edition, 16 states, 160 members of Congress, and 500 cities and towns have called for a constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United, and the list is growing. This is a fight we can win!

America's Battle for Media Democracy

The Triumph of Corporate Libertarianism and the Future of Media Reform

Author: Victor Pickard

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107038332

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 4990

Drawing from extensive archival research, the book uncovers the American media system's historical roots and normative foundations. It charts the rise and fall of a forgotten media-reform movement to recover alternatives and paths not taken.

Captured

The Corporate Infiltration of American Democracy

Author: Sheldon Whitehouse

Publisher: New Press, The

ISBN: 1620972085

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 9395

In Captured, U.S. Senator and former federal prosecutor Sheldon Whitehouse offers an eye-opening take on what corporate influence looks like today from the Senate Floor, adding a first-hand perspective to Jane Mayer’s Dark Money. Americans know something is wrong in their government. Senator Whitehouse combines history, legal scholarship, and personal experiences to provide the first hands-on, comprehensive explanation of what's gone wrong, exposing multiple avenues through which our government has been infiltrated and disabled by corporate powers. Captured reveals an original oversight by the Founders, and shows how and why corporate power has exploited that vulnerability: to strike fear in elected representatives who don’t “get right” by threatening million-dollar "dark money" election attacks (a threat more effective and less expensive than the actual attack); to stack the judiciary—even the Supreme Court—in "business-friendly" ways; to "capture” the administrative agencies meant to regulate corporate behavior; to undermine the civil jury, the Constitution's last bastion for ordinary citizens; and to create a corporate "alternate reality" on public health and safety issues like climate change. Captured shows that in this centuries-long struggle between corporate power and individual liberty, we can and must take our American government back into our own hands.

We the Corporations

How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights

Author: Adam Winkler

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781631495441

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 496

View: 1836

In a revelatory work praised as "excellent and timely" (New York Times Book Review, front page), Adam Winkler, author of Gunfight, once again makes sense of our fraught constitutional history in this incisive portrait of how American businesses seized political power, won "equal rights," and transformed the Constitution to serve big business. Uncovering the deep roots of Citizens United, he repositions that controversial 2010 Supreme Court decision as the capstone of a centuries-old battle for corporate personhood. "Tackling a topic that ought to be at the heart of political debate" (Economist), Winkler surveys more than four hundred years of diverse cases--and the contributions of such legendary legal figures as Daniel Webster, Roger Taney, Lewis Powell, and even Thurgood Marshall--to reveal that "the history of corporate rights is replete with ironies" (Wall Street Journal). We the Corporations is an uncompromising work of history to be read for years to come.

The Corporate Reconstruction of American Capitalism, 1890-1916

The Market, the Law, and Politics

Author: Martin J. Sklar

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521313827

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 484

View: 1915

At the turn of the twentieth century American politics underwent a profound change, as both regulatory minimalism and statist command were rejected in favor of positive government engaged in both regulatory and distributive roles. Through a fresh examination of the judicial, legislative, and political aspects of the antitrust debates in the years from 1890-1916, Martin Sklar shows that the arguments did not arise simply because of competition versus combination, but because of the larger question of the proper relations between government and the market and between state and society.

Corporate Citizen?

An Argument for the Separation of Corporation and State

Author: Ciara Torres-spelliscy

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781632847263

Category:

Page: 312

View: 5787

Over time, corporations have engaged in an aggressive campaign to dramatically enlarge their political and commercial speech and religious rights through strategic litigation and extensive lobbying. At the same time, many large firms have sought to limit their social responsibilities. For the most part, courts have willingly followed corporations down this path. But interestingly, corporations are meeting resistance from many quarters including from customers, investors, and lawmakers. Corporate Citizen? explores this resistance and offers reforms to support these new understandings of the corporation in contemporary society.

Race, Reform, and Regulation of the Electoral Process

Recurring Puzzles in American Democracy

Author: Guy-Uriel E. Charles,Heather K. Gerken,Michael S. Kang

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139497200

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 4403

This book offers a critical re-evaluation of three fundamental and interlocking themes in American democracy: the relationship between race and politics, the performance and reform of election systems and the role of courts in regulating the political process. This edited volume features contributions from some of the leading voices in election law and social science. The authors address the recurring questions for American democracy and identify new challenges for the twenty-first century. They not only consider where current policy and scholarship are headed, but also suggest where they ought to go over the next two decades. The book thus provides intellectual guideposts for future scholarship and policy making in American democracy.

The Structure of Corporate Political Action

Interfirm Relations and Their Consequences

Author: Mark S. Mizruchi

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674843776

Category: Political Science

Page: 299

View: 5725

Are large American corporations politically unified or divided? This question, which has important implications for the viability of American democracy, has frustrated social scientists and political commentators for decades. Despite years of increasingly sophisticated research, resolution of the issue remains as elusive as ever. In this important new book, Mark S. Mizruchi presents and tests an original model of corporate political behavior. He argues that because the business community is characterized by both unity and conflict, the key issue is not whether business is unified but the conditions under which unity or conflict occurs. Adopting a structural model of social action, Mizruchi examines the effects of factors such as geographic proximity, common industry membership, stock ownership, interlocking directorates, and interfirm market relations on the extent to which firms behave similarly. The model is tested with data on the campaign contributions of corporate political action committees and corporate testimony before Congress. Mizruchi finds that both organizational and social network factors contribute to similar behavior and that similar behavior increases a group's likelihood of political success. This study demonstrates that rather than making their political decisions in a vacuum, firms are influenced by the social structures within which they are embedded. The results establish for the first time that the nature of relations between firms has real political consequences. The Structure of Corporate Political Action will be of interest not only to social scientists but to anyone concerned with the future of American democracy.

Phantom Democracy

Corporate Interests and Political Power in America

Author: C. Boggs

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9781349296767

Category: Political Science

Page: 302

View: 2498

In a powerful new book, Boggs traces the historical evolution of American politics by focusing on the gradual triumph of corporate and military power over democratic institutions and practices. The consequences of expanding United States global presence since World War II - involving an integrated and interwoven system of power based in the permanent war economy, national security-state, and corporate interests - has meant erosion of democratic politics, strengthening of the imperial presidency, increased corporate and military influence over elections and legislation, weakening of popular governance, and diminution of citizenship. The events of 9/11 and their aftermath, including the War on Terror, two lengthy wars and foreign occupations, new threats of war, and massive increases in Pentagon spending, have only deepened the trend toward ever-more concentrated forms of power in a society that ostensibly embraces democratic values. Such developments, Boggs argues, have deep origins in American history going back to the founding documents, ideological precepts of the Constitution, early oligarchic rule, slavery, the Indian wars, and westward colonial expansion.

New Perspectives on Regulation

Author: David A. Moss,John Cisternino

Publisher: The Tobin Project

ISBN: 0982478801

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 166

View: 2272

As an experiment in reconnecting academia to the broader democracy, this work is designed to invigorate public policy debate by rededicating academic work to the pursuit of solutions to society's great problems.

Taking the Risk Out of Democracy

Corporate Propaganda Versus Freedom and Liberty

Author: Alex Carey,Andrew Lohrey

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252066160

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 215

View: 7827

Corporate Dreams

Big Business in American Democracy from the Great Depression to the Great Recession

Author: James Hoopes

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813552044

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 248

View: 5052

Public trust in corporations plummeted in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, when “Lehman Brothers” and “General Motors” became dirty words for many Americans. In Corporate Dreams, James Hoopes argues that Americans still place too much faith in corporations and, especially, in the idea of “values-based leadership” favored by most CEOs. The danger of corporations, he suggests, lies not just in their economic power, but also in how their confused and undemocratic values are infecting Americans’ visions of good governance. Corporate Dreams proposes that Americans need to radically rethink their relationships with big business and the government. Rather than buying into the corporate notion of “values-based leadership,” we should view corporate leaders with the same healthy suspicion that our democratic political tradition teaches us to view our political leaders. Unfortunately, the trend is moving the other way. Corporate notions of leadership are invading our democratic political culture when it should be the reverse. To diagnose the cause and find a cure for our toxic attachment to corporate models of leadership, Hoopes goes back to the root of the problem, offering a comprehensive history of corporate culture in America, from the Great Depression to today’s Great Recession. Combining a historian’s careful eye with an insider’s perspective on the business world, this provocative volume tracks changes in government economic policy, changes in public attitudes toward big business, and changes in how corporate executives view themselves. Whether examining the rise of Leadership Development programs or recounting JFK’s Pyrrhic victory over U.S. Steel, Hoopes tells a compelling story of how America lost its way, ceding authority to the policies and values of corporate culture. But he also shows us how it’s not too late to return to our democratic ideals—and that it’s not too late to restore the American dream.

The Fracturing of the American Corporate Elite

Author: Mark S. Mizruchi

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674075366

Category: Social Science

Page: 363

View: 3225

Critics warn that corporate leaders have too much influence over American politics. Mark Mizruchi worries they exert too little. American CEOs have abdicated their civic responsibilities in helping the government address national challenges, with grave consequences for society. A sobering assessment of the dissolution of America’s business class.

Unequal Protection

How Corporations Became ""People"" -- and How You Can Fight Back

Author: Thom Hartmann

Publisher: Berrett-Koehler Publishers

ISBN: 1605095605

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 360

View: 7635

Hartmann tells a startling story of the rise of corporate dominance and the theft of human rights as corporations use the Fourteenth Amendment to further their own agendas.

Democracy and the News

Author: Herbert J. Gans

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195173277

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 168

View: 1347

American democracy was founded on the belief that ultimate power rests in an informed citizenry. But that belief appears naive in an era when private corporations manipulate public policy and the individual citizen is dwarfed by agencies, special interest groups, and other organizations that have a firm grasp on real political and economic power. In Democracy and the News, one of America's most astute social critics explores the crucial link between a weakened news media and weakened democracy. Building on his 1979 classic media critique Deciding What's News, Herbert Gans shows how, with the advent of cable news networks, the internet, and a proliferation of other sources, the role of contemporary journalists has shrunk, as the audience for news moves away from major print and electronic media to smaller and smaller outlets. Gans argues that journalism also suffers from assembly-line modes of production, with the major product being publicity for the president and other top political officials, the very people citizens most distrust. In such an environment, investigative journalism--which could offer citizens the information they need to make intelligent critical choices on a range of difficult issues--cannot flourish. But Gans offers incisive suggestions about what the news media can do to recapture its role in American society and what political and economic changes might move us closer to a true citizen's democracy. Touching on questions of critical national importance, Democracy and the News sheds new light on the vital importance of a healthy news media for a healthy democracy.