Courts

A Comparative and Political Analysis

Author: Martin Shapiro

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022616134X

Category: Law

Page: 256

View: 1348

In this provocative work, Martin Shapiro proposes an original model for the study of courts, one that emphasizes the different modes of decision making and the multiple political roles that characterize the functioning of courts in different political systems.

Freedom of Speech: The Supreme Court and Judicial Review

Author: Martin Shapiro

Publisher: Quid Pro Books

ISBN: 1458196860

Category: Law

Page: 194

View: 3694

One of the great continuing disputes of U.S. politics is about the role of the Supreme Court. Another is about the First Amendment. This book is about both. A classic defense of the openly political role of the Court, this book belies the notion reasserted recently by Chief Justice Roberts that judges are just neutral umpires. Especially in the area of speech, judges make policy; they create law.

In Whose Name?

A Public Law Theory of International Adjudication

Author: Armin von Bogdandy,Ingo Venzke

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191026956

Category: Law

Page: 400

View: 8561

The vast majority of all international judicial decisions have been issued since 1990. This increasing activity of international courts over the past two decades is one of the most significant developments within the international law. It has repercussions on all levels of governance and has challenged received understandings of the nature and legitimacy of international courts. It was previously held that international courts are simply instruments of dispute settlement, whose activities are justified by the consent of the states that created them, and in whose name they decide. However, this understanding ignores other important judicial functions, underrates problems of legitimacy, and prevents a full assessment of how international adjudication functions, and the impact that it has demonstrably had. This book proposes a public law theory of international adjudication, which argues that international courts are multifunctional actors who exercise public authority and therefore require democratic legitimacy. It establishes this theory on the basis of three main building blocks: multifunctionality, the notion of an international public authority, and democracy. The book aims to answer the core question of the legitimacy of international adjudication: in whose name do international courts decide? It lays out the specific problem of the legitimacy of international adjudication, and reconstructs the common critiques of international courts. It develops a concept of democracy for international courts that makes it possible to constructively show how their legitimacy is derived. It argues that ultimately international courts make their decisions, even if they do not know it, in the name of the peoples and the citizens of the international community.

Courts

A Text/Reader

Author: Cassia Spohn,Craig Hemmens

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1412997186

Category: Law

Page: 641

View: 5312

Courts: A Text/Reader provides the best of both worlds— authored text sections with carefully selected accompanying readings that illustrate the questions and controversies legal scholars and court researchers are investigating in the 21st century. The articles, from leading journals in criminology and criminal justice, reflect both classic studies of the criminal court system and state-of-the-art research, and often have a policy perspective that makes them more applied, less theoretical, and more interesting to both undergraduate and graduate students.

The End of the Charter Revolution

Looking Back from the New Normal

Author: Peter J. McCormick

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 144260641X

Category: Political Science

Page: 304

View: 6955

The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms became an entrenched part of the Canadian Constitution on April 17, 1982. The Charter represented a significant change in Canadian constitutional order and carried the courts, and the Supreme Court in particular, decisively into some of the biggest controversies in Canadian politics. Although the impact of the Charter on Canadian law and society was profound, a new status quo has been established. Even though there will be future Charter surprises and decisions that will claim news headlines, Peter J. McCormick argues that these cases will be occasional rather than frequent, and that the Charter "revolution" is over. Or, as he puts it in his introduction, "I will tell a story about the Charter, about the big ripples that have gradually but steadily died away such that the surface of the pond is now almost smooth." The End of the Charter Revolution explores the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, beginning with a general historical background, followed by a survey of the significant changes brought about as Charter decisions were made. The book addresses a series of specific cases made before the Dickson, Lamer, and McLachlin Courts, and then provides empirical data to support the argument that the Charter revolution has ended. The Supreme Court has without question become "a national institution of the first order," but even though the Charter is a large part of why this has happened, it is not Charter decisions that will showcase the exercise of this power in the future.

The Indonesian Supreme Court

A Study of Institutional Collapse

Author: S. Pompe

Publisher: SEAP Publications

ISBN: 9780877277385

Category: Political Science

Page: 494

View: 7291

Since the fall of Indonesian president Suharto, a major focus of the country's reformers has been the corrupt and inefficient judicial system. Within the context of a history of the Supreme Court in post-independence Indonesia, Sebastiaan Pompe analyzes the causes of the judiciary's failure over the last five decades. This study provides an essential background for those seeking to understand why legal reform has been so slow and frustrating in the post-1998 period.

Judging Russia

The Role of the Constitutional Court in Russian Politics 1990–2006

Author: Alexei Trochev

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139471104

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 4563

This is a study of the actual role that the Russian Constitutional Court played in protecting fundamental rights and resolving legislative-executive struggles and federalism disputes in both Yeltsin's and Putin's Russia. Trochev argues that judicial empowerment is a non-linear process with unintended consequences and that courts that depend on their reputation flourish only if an effective and capable state is there to support them. This is because judges can rely only on the authoritativeness of their judgments, unlike politicians and bureaucrats, who have the material resources necessary to respond to judicial decisions. Drawing upon systematic analysis of all decisions of the Russian Court (published and unpublished) and previously unavailable materials on their (non-)implementation, and resting on a combination of the approaches from comparative politics, law, and public administration, this book shows how and why judges attempted to reform Russia's governance and fought to ensure compliance with their judgments.

Globalisation and Jurisdiction

Author: Pieter J. Slot,Mielle K. Bulterman,E.M. Meijers Instituut

Publisher: Kluwer Law International B.V.

ISBN: 9041123075

Category: Law

Page: 314

View: 6475

The spectacular growth of the international economy over the past decades has called for a more intensive role for the law, and probably also a different kind of law. In 2002, the Europa Instituut of Leiden University convened a seminar to discuss the various responses to the challenges posed by globalism in different fields of economic activity and legal practice. Their presentations are presented in this book in a more formal and extensive format.

Comparative Law and Society

Author: David Scott Clark

Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

ISBN: 1781006091

Category: Law

Page: 480

View: 1745

Comparative Law and Society, part of the Research Handbooks in Comparative Law series, is a pioneering volume that comprises 19 original essays written by expert authors from across the world. This innovative handbook offers both a history of the field of comparative law and society and a thorough exploration of its methods, disciplines, and major issues, presenting the most comprehensive look into this contemporary field to date. In Part I, Methods and Disciplines, contributors approach critical issues in comparative law and society from a variety of academic fields, including sociology, criminology, anthropology, economics, political science, and psychology. This multidisciplinary approach highlights the importance of addressing the variance of perspectives inherent to the field. In Part II, Core Issues, chapters offer an exploration of major legal institutions, processes, professionals, and cultures associated with particular legal subjects. Since authors utilize the perspective of at least two different legal systems, this book offers a truly thorough and wide-ranging focus. the general reader, as well as students and scholars, will find this handbook useful in their continuing explorations into the interaction between law and society. Practitioners such as lawyers and judges with an interest in global perspectives of law will also find much to admire in this innovative volume.

Interpretation in International Law

Author: Andrea Bianchi,Daniel Peat,Matthew Windsor

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191038709

Category: Law

Page: 380

View: 9129

International lawyers have long recognised the importance of interpretation to their academic discipline and professional practice. As new insights on interpretation abound in other fields, international law and international lawyers have largely remained wedded to a rule-based approach, focusing almost exclusively on the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties. Such an approach neglects interpretation as a distinct and broader field of theoretical inquiry. Interpretation in International Law brings international legal scholars together to engage in sustained reflection on the theme of interpretation. The book is creatively structured around the metaphor of the game, which captures and illuminates the constituent elements of an act of interpretation. The object of the game of interpretation is to persuade the audience that one's interpretation of the law is correct. The rules of play are known and complied with by the players, even though much is left to their skills and strategies. There is also a meta-discourse about the game of interpretation - 'playing the game of game-playing' - which involves consideration of the nature of the game, its underlying stakes, and who gets to decide by what rules one should play. Through a series of diverse contributions, Interpretation in International Law reveals interpretation as an inescapable feature of all areas of international law. It will be of interest and utility to all international lawyers whose work touches upon theoretical or practical aspects of interpretation.

Rights Before Courts

A Study of Constitutional Courts in Postcommunist States of Central and Eastern Europe

Author: Wojciech Sadurski

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781402030062

Category: Education

Page: 377

View: 2461

Challenging the conventional wisdom that constitutional courts are the best device that democratic systems have for the protection of individual rights, Wojciech Sadurski examines carefully the most recent wave of activist constitutional courts: those that have emerged after the fall of communism in Central and Eastern Europe. In contrast to most other analysts and scholars he does not take for granted that they are a "force for the good", but rather subjects them to critical scrutiny against the background of a wide-ranging comparative and theoretical analysis of constitutional judicial review in the modern world. He shows that, in the region of Central and Eastern Europe, their record in protecting constitutional rights has been mixed, and their impact upon the vibrancy of democratic participation and public discourse about controversial issues often negative. Sadurski urges us to reconsider the frequently unthinking enthusiasm for the imposition of judicial limits upon constitutional democracy. In the end, his reflections go to the very heart of the fundamental dilemma of constitutionalism and political theory: how best to find the balance between constitutionalism and democracy? The lively, if imperfect, democracies in Central and Eastern Europe provide a fascinating terrain for raising this question, and testing traditional answers. This innovative, wide-ranging and thought-provoking book will become essential reading for scholars and students alike in the fields of comparative constitutionalism and political theory, particularly for those with an interest in legal and political developments in the postcommunist world

Tradition and Change in Administrative Law

An Anglo-German Comparison

Author: Marina Künnecke

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 3540486895

Category: Law

Page: 266

View: 3441

Administrative legal systems are based on national constitutional legal traditions and cultural values. This book offers a historical and comparative analysis of English and German Administrative law. There is a growing need for comparative material and analysis in Administrative law - this book provides a valuable contribution to this field.

The Oxford Handbook of State and Local Government

Author: Donald P. Haider-Markel

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191611964

Category: Political Science

Page: 976

View: 1615

The Oxford Handbook of State and Local Government is an historic undertaking. It contains a wide range of essays that define the important questions in the field, evaluate where we are in answering them, and set the direction and terms of discourse for future work. The Handbook will have a substantial influence in defining the field for years to come. The chapters critically assess both the key works of state and local politics literature and the ways in which the sub-field has developed. It covers the main areas of study in subnational politics by exploring the central contributions to the comparative study of institutions, behavior, and policy in the American context. Each chapter outlines an agenda for future research.

Public Interest Environmental Litigation in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh

Author: Jona Razzaque

Publisher: Kluwer Law International B.V.

ISBN: 9041122141

Category: Law

Page: 502

View: 1716

This research examines the growth and expansion of public interest environmental litigation (PIEL) in India and analyses the changes that are influencing the development of PIEL in Bangladesh and Pakistan. The necessity for this research lies in the rapid degradation of environment and the need of efficient environmental management in the three countries of the South Asian region. Here, we compare the legal systems of the three countries from the environmental point of view, discuss new ideas and directions and critically analyse the legal provisions that would help to apply environmental norms. These offer the legislators a chance to find out what can be applied in their own region, thus developing their existing legal mechanisms. About the author Jona Razzaque is barrister and holds a PhD in law from the University of London. She works in the field of access to environmental justice and has published numerous articles on this issue. She taught law in Queen Mary College and School of Oriental and African Studies under the University of London. She is currently working as a lawyer in the Foundation for International Environmental Law and Development (FIELD) on cross-themed projects related to bio-diversity, trade and climate change.

Laws Harsh As Tigers

Chinese Immigrants and the Shaping of Modern Immigration Law

Author: Lucy E. Salyer

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807864319

Category: Law

Page: 360

View: 7312

Focusing primarily on the exclusion of the Chinese, Lucy Salyer analyzes the popular and legal debates surrounding immigration law and its enforcement during the height of nativist sentiment in the early twentieth century. She argues that the struggles between Chinese immigrants, U.S. government officials, and the lower federal courts that took place around the turn of the century established fundamental principles that continue to dominate immigration law today and make it unique among branches of American law. By establishing the centrality of the Chinese to immigration policy, Salyer also integrates the history of Asian immigrants on the West Coast with that of European immigrants in the East. Salyer demonstrates that Chinese immigrants and Chinese Americans mounted sophisticated and often-successful legal challenges to the enforcement of exclusionary immigration policies. Ironically, their persistent litigation contributed to the development of legal doctrines that gave the Bureau of Immigration increasing power to counteract resistance. Indeed, by 1924, immigration law had begun to diverge from constitutional norms, and the Bureau of Immigration had emerged as an exceptionally powerful organization, free from many of the constraints imposed upon other government agencies.

Preventive Justice

Author: Andrew Ashworth,Lucia Zedner

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191021059

Category: Law

Page: 310

View: 5096

This book arises from a three-year study of Preventive Justice directed by Professor Andrew Ashworth and Professor Lucia Zedner at the University of Oxford. The study seeks to develop an account of the principles and values that should guide and limit the state's use of preventive techniques that involve coercion against the individual. States today are increasingly using criminal law or criminal law-like tools to try to prevent or reduce the risk of anticipated future harm. Such measures include criminalizing conduct at an early stage in order to allow authorities to intervene; incapacitating suspected future wrongdoers; and imposing extended sentences or indefinate on past wrongdoers on the basis of their predicted future conduct - all in the name of public protection and security. The chief justification for the state's use of coercion is protecting the public from harm. Although the rationales and justifications of state punishment have been explored extensively, the scope, limits and principles of preventive justice have attracted little doctrinal or conceptual analysis. This book re-assesses the foundations for the range of coercive measures that states now take in the name of prevention and public protection, focussing particularly on coercive measures involving deprivation of liberty. It examines whether these measures are justified, whether they distort the proper boundaries between criminal and civil law, or whether they signal a larger change in the architecture of security. In so doing, it sets out to establish a framework for what we call 'Preventive Justice'.

Law, Capitalism and Power in Asia

The Rule of Law and Legal Institutions

Author: Kanishka Jayasuriya

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134738250

Category: Social Science

Page: 360

View: 5939

A challenging and provocative book that contests the liberal assumption that the rule of law will go hand in hand with a transition to market-based economies and even democracy in East Asia. Using case studies from Hong Kong, China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Taiwan, Japan and Vietnam, the authors argue that the rule of law is in fact more likely to provide political elites with the means closely to control civil society. It is essential, therefore, to locate conceptions of judicial independence and the rule of law more generally within the ideological vocabulary of the state.