Dark Horse

A Biography of Wendell Willkie

Author: Steve Neal

Publisher: Biography of Wendell Willkie

ISBN: 9780700604531

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 371

View: 6520

A brisk and lucid account that vividly conveys that sense of the extraordinary in Wilkie's 1940 Republican nomination, in the presidential campaign that followed, and in the service he gave to his country.

A Compassionate Conservative

A Political Biography of Joseph W. Martin, Jr., Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives

Author: James Joseph Kenneally

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9780739106761

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 335

View: 9836

"We could use many more like him in our public life," was how Newsweek summed up the career of Joseph W. Martin Jr., a long-time Republican leader and chairman of the Republican National Committee and National Conventions. In this, the first full-length, scholarly examination of Martin's career, readers will encounter a devoted public servant who often modified his party's extreme stances on domestic matters during the Great Depression and on foreign policy issues leading up to World War II. This political biography effectively illustrates that bipartisanship does not mean abandonment of principles, that kindness, integrity, and gentility are compatible with effective leadership, and that close friendships with members of the opposing party can contribute to a more effective Congress.

Toward Freedom Land

The Long Struggle for Racial Equality in America

Author: Harvard Sitkoff

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813139759

Category: Social Science

Page: 232

View: 9143

The ongoing struggle for civil rights and social justice lies at the heart of America's evolving identity. The pursuit of equal rights is often met with social and political trepidation, forcing citizens and leaders to grapple with controversial issues of race, class, and gender. Renowned scholar Harvard Sitkoff has devoted his life to the study of the civil rights movement, becoming a key figure in global human rights discussions and an authority on American liberalism. Toward Freedom Land assembles Sitkoff 's writings on twentieth-century race relations, representing some of the finest race-related historical research on record. Spanning thirty-five years of Sitkoff 's distingushed career, the collection features an in-depth examination of the Great Depression and its effects on African Americans, the intriguing story of the labor movement and its relationship to African American workers, and a discussion of the effects of World War II on the civil rights movement. His precise analysis illuminates multifaceted racial issues including the New Deal's impact on race relations, the Detroit Riot of 1943, and connections between African Americans, Jews, and the Holocaust.

The Fall of the House of Roosevelt

Brokers of Ideas and Power from FDR to LBJ

Author: Michael Janeway

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231505779

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 4591

In the 1930s a band of smart and able young men, some still in their twenties, helped Franklin D. Roosevelt transform an American nation in crisis. They were the junior officers of the New Deal. Thomas G. Corcoran, Benjamin V. Cohen, William O. Douglas, Abe Fortas, and James Rowe helped FDR build the modern Democratic Party into a progressive coalition whose command over power and ideas during the next three decades seemed politically invincible. This is the first book about this group of Rooseveltians and their linkage to Lyndon Johnson's Great Society and the Vietnam War debacle. Michael Janeway grew up inside this world. His father, Eliot Janeway, business editor of Time and a star writer for Fortune and Life magazines, was part of this circle, strategizing and practicing politics as well as reporting on these men. Drawing on his intimate knowledge of events and previously unavailable private letters and other documents, Janeway crafts a riveting account of the exercise of power during the New Deal and its aftermath. He shows how these men were at the nexus of reform impulses at the electoral level with reform thinking in the social sciences and the law and explains how this potent fusion helped build the contemporary American state. Since that time efforts to reinvent government by "brains trust" have largely failed in the U.S. In the last quarter of the twentieth century American politics ceased to function as a blend of broad coalition building and reform agenda setting, rooted in a consensus of belief in the efficacy of modern government. Can a progressive coalition of ideas and power come together again? The Fall of the House of Roosevelt makes such a prospect both alluring and daunting.

Against Immediate Evil

American Internationalists and the Four Freedoms on the Eve of World War II

Author: Andrew Johnstone

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801454727

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 4328

In Against Immediate Evil, Andrew Johnstone tells the story of how internationalist Americans worked between 1938 and 1941 to convince the U.S. government and the American public of the need to stem the rising global tide of fascist aggression. As war approached, the internationalist movement attempted to arouse the nation in order to defeat noninterventionism at home and fascism overseas. Johnstone's examination of this movement undermines the common belief that the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor wrenched an isolationist United States into global armed conflict and the struggle for international power. Johnstone focuses on three organizations—the American Committee for Non-Participation in Japanese Aggression, the Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies, and Fight For Freedom—that actively promoted a more global role for the United States based on a conception of the "four freedoms" later made famous by FDR. The desire to be free from fear was seen in concerns regarding America’s immediate national security. The desire to be free from want was expressed in anxieties over the nation’s future economic prosperity. The need for freedom of speech was represented in concerns over the potential loss of political freedoms. Finally, the need for freedom of worship was seen in the emphasis on religious freedoms and broader fears about the future of Western civilization. These groups and their supporters among the public and within the government characterized the growing global conflict as one between two distinct worlds and in doing so, set the tone of American foreign policy for decades to come.

Where did the party go?

William Jennings Bryan, Hubert Humphrey, and the Jeffersonian legacy

Author: Jeff Taylor

Publisher: University of Missouri

ISBN: 9780826216595

Category: History

Page: 373

View: 1121

"Using a twelve-point model of Jeffersonian thought, Taylor appraises the competing views of two Midwestern liberals, William Jennings Bryan and Hubert Humphrey, on economic policy, foreign relations, and political reform to demonstrate how the Democratic

The Eisenhowers

Author: Steve Neal

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780700602605

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 508

View: 9833

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Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Books

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The New Dealers' War

FDR and the War Within World War II

Author: Thomas Fleming

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0786725206

Category: History

Page: 672

View: 1463

Acclaimed historian Thomas Fleming brings to life a flawed and troubled FDR struggling to manage World War II. Starting with the leak to the press of Roosevelt's famous Rainbow Plan, then spiraling back to FDR's inept prewar diplomacy with Japan and his various attempts to lure Japan into an attack on the U.S. Fleet in the Pacific, Fleming takes the reader on a journey through the incredibly fractious struggles and debates that went on in Washington, the nation, and the world as the New Dealers strove to impose their will on the conduct of the War. In bold contrast to the familiar, idealized FDR of other biographies, Fleming's Roosevelt is a man in remorseless decline, battered by ideological forces and primitive hatreds that he could not handle and frequently failed to understand, some of them leading to unimaginable catastrophe. Among FDR's most dismaying policies, Fleming argues, is his insistence on "unconditional surrender" for Germany (a policy that perhaps prolonged the war by as much as two years, leaving millions more dead) and his often-uncritical embrace of and acquiescence to Stalin and the Soviets as an ally. The New Dealers' War is one of those rare books that force readers to rethink what they think they know about a pivotal event in the American past.

Eleanor and Harry

The Correspondence of Eleanor Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman

Author: Eleanor Roosevelt,Harry S. Truman,Steve Neal

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0743202430

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 299

View: 2698

Previously unpublished correspondence between Harry S. Truman and Eleanor Roosevelt offers insight into their sometimes turbulent friendship as it occurred against a backdrop of the Cold War and the rebuilding of postwar Europe.

Grand Old Party

A History of the Republicans

Author: Lewis L. Gould

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199943486

Category: Political Science

Page: 624

View: 6268

From Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War through the disputed election of George W. Bush and beyond, the Republican Party has been at the dramatic center of American politics for 150 years. In Grand Old Party, the first comprehensive history of the Republicans in 40 years, Lewis L. Gould traces the evolution of the Grand Old Party from its emergence as an antislavery coalition in the 1850s to its current role as the champion of political and social conservatism. Here, Gould brings to life the major figures of Republican history - Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and George W. Bush-and uncovers a wealth of fascinating anecdotes about Republicans, from "the Plumed Knight," James G. Blaine, in the 1880s, to Barry Goldwater in the 1960s, to Newt Gingrich in the 1990s. Gould also uncovers the historical forces and issues that have made the Republicans what they are: the crusade against slavery, the rise of big business, the Cold War, and opposition to the power of the federal government. Based on Gould's research in the papers of leading Republicans and his wide reading in the party's history, Grand Old Party is a book that will outlast the noisy tumult of today's partisan debates and endure as a definitive treatment of how the Republicans have shaped the way Americans live together in a democracy. Written with balance and keen insight, Grand Old Party is required reading for anyone interested in American politics, especially as Americans gear up for the 2012 presidential election. Republicans, Democrats, and independents alike will find their understanding of national politics deepened and enriched by this invaluable guide to the unfolding saga of American politics.

Harry and Ike

The Partnership That Remade the Postwar World

Author: Steve Neal

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0743223748

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 368

View: 5151

Between 1945 and 1952, Harry S. Truman and Dwight D. Eisenhower worked more closely than any other two American presidents of the twentieth century; they were partners in changing America's role in the world and in responding to the challenge of a Soviet Europe. And yet, these men of character, intelligence, and principle will likely be remembered for the decade-long epic feud that nearly ended their friendship. In the first biography to examine in depth their political collaboration, bitter rupture, and eventual reconciliation, Steve Neal, political columnist for the "Chicago Sun-Times," provides a fresh perspective on these two remarkable leaders, and on the American presidency itself.

Happy Days Are Here Again

The 1932 Democratic Convention, the Emergence of FDR--and How America Was Changed Forever

Author: Steven Neal

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062015419

Category: Political Science

Page: 400

View: 8443

Political conventions in years past were more than pep rallies for preselected candidates -- they were suspenseful, no-holds-barred battles for the nomination. In 1932, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the man who would become one of America's most beloved presidents, was far from a shoo-in for the Democratic nomination at the party's convention in Chicago. Using new sources of information, award-winning reporter Steve Neal weaves the compelling story of how FDR finally got the nod along with the personalities of the day who influenced the decision, including Joseph P. Kennedy, Al Smith, Huey Long, and William Randolph Hearst.

Wendell Willkie

Hoosier Internationalist

Author: James H. Madison

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253336194

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 184

View: 823

"The 12 assessments of Wendell Willkie in this book are exceptionally well done. They are interesting reading about a most interesting man." —The Coffeyville (KS) Journal "... a remarkable and useful compilation of essays... " —Indiana Magazine of History Indiana's Wendell Willkie burst upon the national political scene in 1940 when, apparently out of nowhere, he won the Republican nomination for the presidency and ran against Franklin Roosevelt. After his defeat, he traveled widely and returned to write ÂOne World, which had a tremendous impact on the then-isolationist United States. "There was about him," the ÂNew York Times editorialized, "a warm and winning sincerity... a natural straightforwardness which left untouched no one who knew him." These essays by a distinguished group of historians recognize one of the state's most famous native sons and reassess his impact on history one hundred years after his birth.

Rendezvous with Destiny

How Franklin D. Roosevelt and Five Extraordinary Men Took America into the War a nd into the World

Author: Michael Fullilove

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101617829

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 4654

The remarkable untold story of Franklin D. Roosevelt and the five extraordinary men he used to pull America into World War II In the dark days between Hitler’s invasion of Poland in September 1939 and Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, Franklin D. Roosevelt sent five remarkable men on dramatic and dangerous missions to Europe. The missions were highly unorthodox and they confounded and infuriated diplomats on both sides of the Atlantic. Their importance is little understood to this day. In fact, they were crucial to the course of the Second World War. The envoys were magnificent, unforgettable characters. First off the mark was Sumner Welles, the chilly, patrician under secretary of state, later ruined by his sexual misdemeanors, who was dispatched by FDR on a tour of European capitals in the spring of 1940. In summer of that year, after the fall of France, William “Wild Bill” Donovan—war hero and future spymaster—visited a lonely United Kingdom at the president’s behest to determine whether she could hold out against the Nazis. Donovan’s report helped convince FDR that Britain was worth backing. After he won an unprecedented third term in November 1940, Roosevelt threw a lifeline to the United Kingdom in the form of Lend-Lease and dispatched three men to help secure it. Harry Hopkins, the frail social worker and presidential confidant, was sent to explain Lend-Lease to Winston Churchill. Averell Harriman, a handsome, ambitious railroad heir, served as FDR’s man in London, expediting Lend-Lease aid and romancing Churchill’s daughter-in-law. Roosevelt even put to work his rumpled, charismatic opponent in the 1940 presidential election, Wendell Willkie, whose visit lifted British morale and won wary Americans over to the cause. Finally, in the aftermath of Germany’s invasion of the Soviet Union, Hopkins returned to London to confer with Churchill and traveled to Moscow to meet with Joseph Stalin. This final mission gave Roosevelt the confidence to bet on the Soviet Union. The envoys’ missions took them into the middle of the war and exposed them to the leading figures of the age. Taken together, they plot the arc of America’s trans¬formation from a divided and hesitant middle power into the global leader. At the center of everything, of course, was FDR himself, who moved his envoys around the globe with skill and élan. We often think of Harry S. Truman, George Marshall, Dean Acheson, and George F. Kennan as the authors of America’s global primacy in the second half of the twentieth century. But all their achievements were enabled by the earlier work of Roosevelt and his representatives, who took the United States into the war and, by defeating domestic isolationists and foreign enemies, into the world. In these two years, America turned. FDR and his envoys were responsible for the turn. Drawing on vast archival research, Rendezvous with Destiny is narrative history at its most delightful, stirring, and important.

The Republicans

A History of the Grand Old Party

Author: Lewis L. Gould

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199942935

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 3961

Lewis L. Gould's 2003 history of the Republican Party was a fast-paced account of Republican fortunes. The Republicans won praise for its even-handed, incisive analysis of Republican history, drawing on Gould's deep knowledge of the evolution of national political history and acute feel for the interplay of personalities and ideology. In this revised and updated edition, Gould extends this history, adding a new chapter on the George W. Bush presidency, the election of 2008, and the response of the Grand Old Party to Barack Obama. His narrative covers such contemporary figures as Newt Gingrich, Sarah Palin, and John McCain, as well as forgotten Republican leaders including James G. Blaine, Mark Hanna, Wendell Willkie, and Robert A. Taft. Contending that the historic Republican skepticism about the legitimacy of the Democratic Party has shaped American politics since the Civil War, Gould argues that the persistent flaw in the relations between the two parties has led the nation to the current crisis of stalemate and partisan bitterness. No other account of Republican history is as up-to-date, crammed with fascinating information, and ready to serve as an informed guide to today's partisan warfare. Lay readers and political junkies alike seeking the best book on Republican history will find what they are looking for in Gould's comprehensive volume.

Rule and Ruin

The Downfall of Moderation and the Destruction of the Republican Party, From Eisenhower to the Tea Party

Author: Geoffrey Kabaservice

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199912904

Category: History

Page: 504

View: 8031

The chaotic events leading up to Mitt Romney's defeat in the 2012 election indicated how far the Republican Party had rocketed rightward away from the center of public opinion. Republicans in Congress threatened to shut down the government and force a U.S. debt default. Tea Party activists mounted primary challenges against Republican officeholders who appeared to exhibit too much pragmatism or independence. Moderation and compromise were dirty words in the Republican presidential debates. The GOP, it seemed, had suddenly become a party of ideological purity. Except this development is not new at all. In Rule and Ruin, Geoffrey Kabaservice reveals that the moderate Republicans' downfall began not with the rise of the Tea Party but about the time of President Dwight Eisenhower's farewell address. Even in the 1960s, when left-wing radicalism and right-wing backlash commanded headlines, Republican moderates and progressives formed a powerful movement, supporting pro-civil rights politicians like Nelson Rockefeller and William Scranton, battling big-government liberals and conservative extremists alike. But the Republican civil war ended with the overthrow of the moderate ideas, heroes, and causes that had comprised the core of the GOP since its formation. In hindsight, it is today's conservatives who are "Republicans in Name Only." Writing with passionate sympathy for a bygone tradition of moderation, Kabaservice recaptures a time when fiscal restraint was matched with social engagement; when a cohort of leading Republicans opposed the Vietnam war; when George Romney--father of Mitt Romney--conducted a nationwide tour of American poverty, from Appalachia to Watts, calling on society to "listen to the voices from the ghetto." Rule and Ruin is an epic, deeply researched history that reorients our understanding of our political past and present. Today, following the Republicans' loss of the popular vote in five of the last six presidential contests, moderates remain marginalized in the GOP and progressives are all but nonexistent. In this insightful and elegantly argued book, Kabaservice contends that their decline has left Republicans less capable of governing responsibly, with dire consequences for all Americans. He has added a new afterword that considers the fallout from the 2012 elections.