Death in Transit

Author: Keith Moray

Publisher: Ulverscroft

ISBN: 9781444820393

Category: Fiction

Page: 288

View: 8153

Mystery West Uist, Scotland. When a body is found floating in Kyleshiffin harbour, it is unclear whether there has been a tragic accident or a cold-blooded murder. A chalked astrological sign on the harbour wall gathers significance when a second body and another sign are discovered. This time there is no doubt - it was murder most foul. There is no shortage of suspects, with tensions running high between the local astronomical and astrological societies. And the signs are that there will be more deaths, unless Inspector Torquil McKinnon and his team can solve the case and find the zodiac killer.

Handbook of Death and Dying

Author: Clifton D. Bryant

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 1452265151

Category: Social Science

Page: 1144

View: 457

Dying is a social as well as physiological phenomenon. Each society characterizes and, consequently, treats death and dying in its own individual ways—ways that differ markedly. These particular patterns of death and dying engender modal cultural responses, and such institutionalized behavior has familiar, economical, educational, religious, and political implications. The Handbook of Death and Dying takes stock of the vast literature in the field of thanatology, arranging and synthesizing what has been an unwieldy body of knowledge into a concise, yet comprehensive reference work. This two-volume handbook will provide direction and momentum to the study of death-related behavior for many years to come. Key Features More than 100 contributors representing authoritative expertise in a diverse array of disciplines Anthropology Family Studies History Law Medicine Mortuary Science Philosophy Psychology Social work Sociology Theology A distinguished editorial board of leading scholars and researchers in the field More than 100 definitive essays covering almost every dimension of death-related behavior Comprehensive and inclusive, exploring concepts and social patterns within the larger topical concern Journal article length essays that address topics with appropriate detail Multidisciplinary and cross-cultural coverage

Death and Dying in Contemporary Japan

Author: Hikaru Suzuki

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136213651

Category: Social Science

Page: 246

View: 6469

This book, based on extensive original research, explores the various ways in which Japanese people think about death and how they approach the process of dying and death. It shows how new forms of funeral ceremonies have been developed by the funeral industry, how traditional grave burial is being replaced in some cases by the scattering of ashes and forest mortuary ritual, and how Japanese thinking on relationships, the value of life, and the afterlife are changing. Throughout, it assesses how these changes reflect changing social structures and social values.

A Death in Washington

Walter G. Krivitsky and the Stalin Terror

Author: Gary Kern

Publisher: Enigma Books

ISBN: 1929631251

Category: History

Page: 505

View: 9777

A new edition of the study explores the life of "master spy" Walter G. Krivitsky, who exposed dangers of the Stalin regime to the West and eventually ended up dead of "suicide" in Washington, D.C., a suspicious event that has raised questions about his last years as a spy. Reprint.

Death in the Air

The True Story of a Serial Killer, the Great London Smog, and the Strangling of a City

Author: Kate Winkler Dawson

Publisher: Hachette Books

ISBN: 0316506850

Category: True Crime

Page: 352

View: 9068

A real-life thriller in the vein of The Devil in the White City, Kate Winkler Dawson's debut Death in the Air is a gripping, historical narrative of a serial killer, an environmental disaster, and an iconic city struggling to regain its footing. London was still recovering from the devastation of World War II when another disaster hit: for five long days in December 1952, a killer smog held the city firmly in its grip and refused to let go. Day became night, mass transit ground to a halt, criminals roamed the streets, and some 12,000 people died from the poisonous air. But in the chaotic aftermath, another killer was stalking the streets, using the fog as a cloak for his crimes. All across London, women were going missing--poor women, forgotten women. Their disappearances caused little alarm, but each of them had one thing in common: they had the misfortune of meeting a quiet, unassuming man, John Reginald Christie, who invited them back to his decrepit Notting Hill flat during that dark winter. They never left. The eventual arrest of the "Beast of Rillington Place" caused a media frenzy: were there more bodies buried in the walls, under the floorboards, in the back garden of this house of horrors? Was it the fog that had caused Christie to suddenly snap? And what role had he played in the notorious double murder that had happened in that same apartment building not three years before--a murder for which another, possibly innocent, man was sent to the gallows? The Great Smog of 1952 remains the deadliest air pollution disaster in world history, and John Reginald Christie is still one of the most unfathomable serial killers of modern times. Journalist Kate Winkler Dawson braids these strands together into a taut, compulsively readable true crime thriller about a man who changed the fate of the death penalty in the UK, and an environmental catastrophe with implications that still echo today.

Death and Redemption

The Gulag and the Shaping of Soviet Society

Author: Steven A. Barnes

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400838615

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 8074

Death and Redemption offers a fundamental reinterpretation of the role of the Gulag--the Soviet Union's vast system of forced-labor camps, internal exile, and prisons--in Soviet society. Soviet authorities undoubtedly had the means to exterminate all the prisoners who passed through the Gulag, but unlike the Nazis they did not conceive of their concentration camps as instruments of genocide. In this provocative book, Steven Barnes argues that the Gulag must be understood primarily as a penal institution where prisoners were given one final chance to reintegrate into Soviet society. Millions whom authorities deemed "reeducated" through brutal forced labor were allowed to leave. Millions more who "failed" never got out alive. Drawing on newly opened archives in Russia and Kazakhstan as well as memoirs by actual prisoners, Barnes shows how the Gulag was integral to the Soviet goal of building a utopian socialist society. He takes readers into the Gulag itself, focusing on one outpost of the Gulag system in the Karaganda region of Kazakhstan, a location that featured the full panoply of Soviet detention institutions. Barnes traces the Gulag experience from its beginnings after the 1917 Russian Revolution to its decline following the 1953 death of Stalin. Death and Redemption reveals how the Gulag defined the border between those who would reenter Soviet society and those who would be excluded through death.

Death in the Delta

Uncovering a Mississippi Family Secret

Author: Molly Walling

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1617036102

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 220

View: 8820

Growing up, Molly Walling could not fathom the source of the dark and intense discomfort in her family home. Then in 2006 she discovered her father’s complicity in the murder of two black men on December 12, 1946, in Anguilla, deep in the Mississippi Delta. Death in the Delta tells the story of one woman’s search for the truth behind a closely held, sixty-year old family secret. Though the author’s mother and father decided that they would protect their three children from that past, its effect was profound. When the story of a fatal shoot-out surfaced, apprehension turned into a devouring need to know. Each of Walling’s trips from North Carolina to the Delta brought unsettling and unexpected clues. After a hearing before an all-white grand jury, her father’s case was not prosecuted. Indeed, it appeared as if the incident never occurred, and he resumed his life as a small-town newspaper editor. Yet family members of one of the victims tell her their stories. A ninety-three-year-old black historian and witness gives context and advice. A county attorney suggests her family’s history of commingling with black women was at the heart of the deadly confrontation. Firsthand the author recognizes how privilege, entitlement, and racial bias in a wealthy, landed southern family resulted in a deadly abuse of power followed by a stifling, decades-long cover up. Death in the Delta is a deeply personal account of a quest to confront a terrible legacy. Against the advice and warnings of family, Walling exposes her father’s guilty agency in the deaths of Simon Toombs and David Jones. She also exposes his gift as a writer and creative thinker. The author, grappling with wrenching issues of family and honor, was long conflicted about making this story public. But her mission became one of hope that confronting the truth might somehow move others toward healing and reconciliation.

Sudden Death in Infants

Proceedings. [Edited By] Ralph J. Wedgwood and Earl P. Benditt

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Death

Page: 165

View: 1041

Death in America

Author: Philippe Ariès,David E. Stannard

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1975

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 158

View: 3126

Sociopolitics of Migrant Death and Repatriation

Perspectives from Forensic Science

Author: Krista E. Latham,Alyson J. O'Daniel

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319618660

Category: Social Science

Page: 177

View: 5799

As scholars have by now long contended, global neoliberalism and the violence associated with state restructuring provide key frameworks for understanding flows of people across national boundaries and, eventually, into the treacherous terrains of the United States borderlands. The proposed volume builds on this tradition of situating migration and migrant death within broad, systems-level frameworks of analysis, but contends that there is another, perhaps somewhat less tidy, but no less important sociopolitical story to be told here. Through examination of how forensic scientists define, navigate, and enact their work at the frontiers of US policy and economics, this book joins a robust body of literature dedicated to bridging social theory with bioarchaeological applications to modern day problems. This volume is based on deeply and critically reflective analyses, submitted by individual scholars, wherein they navigate and position themselves as social actors embedded within and, perhaps partially constituted by, relations of power, cultural ideologies, and the social structures characterizing this moment in history. Each contribution addresses a different variation on themes of power relations, production of knowledge, and reflexivity in practice. In sum, however, the chapters of this book trace relationships between institutions, entities, and individuals comprising the landscapes of migrant death and repatriation and considers their articulation with sociopolitical dynamics of the neoliberal state.

The Death of Democracy

Hitler's Rise to Power and the Downfall of the Weimar Republic

Author: Benjamin Carter Hett

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 1250162513

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 4703

A riveting account of how the Nazi Party came to power and how the failures of the Weimar Republic and the shortsightedness of German politicians allowed it to happen. Why did democracy fall apart so quickly and completely in Germany in the 1930s? How did a democratic government allow Adolf Hitler to seize power? In The Death of Democracy, Benjamin Carter Hett answers these questions, and the story he tells has disturbing resonances for our own time. To say that Hitler was elected is too simple. He would never have come to power if Germany’s leading politicians had not responded to a spate of populist insurgencies by trying to co-opt him, a strategy that backed them into a corner from which the only way out was to bring the Nazis in. Hett lays bare the misguided confidence of conservative politicians who believed that Hitler and his followers would willingly support them, not recognizing that their efforts to use the Nazis actually played into Hitler’s hands. They had willingly given him the tools to turn Germany into a vicious dictatorship. Benjamin Carter Hett is a leading scholar of twentieth-century Germany and a gifted storyteller whose portraits of these feckless politicians show how fragile democracy can be when those in power do not respect it. He offers a powerful lesson for today, when democracy once again finds itself embattled and the siren song of strongmen sounds ever louder.

Life and Death in Early Colonial Ecuador

Author: Linda A. Newson

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806126975

Category: History

Page: 505

View: 5612

"Historical demography for 16th- and 17th-century Ecuador. The book's regional framework reveals major differences in mortality rates. Calculates that depopulation in the Sierra during the 16th century was four times that of the Coast"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. 57.

Death in Dyker Heights

A Hal Silver Mystery

Author: Stephan Saks

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1477138803

Category: Fiction

Page: 96

View: 4969

Hal Silver is back and he's crankier than ever. But who can blame him? He's been hired by a mob kingpin who wants him to find out who murdered his son Vinny Viano and he doesn't have a clue where to start. And his only help is the dim witted gangster's assistant whose only concern is how many pieces he wants to break Hal into should he fail to solve the case. Wandering the south Brooklyn streets of Dyker Heights, Hal meets neighborhood characters and cronies, babes and bumblers. No one has a bad thing to say about Vinny, but someone clearly didn't like him as much he let on. And if Hal doesn't find the killer soon, the next corpse may be his own.

In Transit

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Bus lines

Page: N.A

View: 8403

Vols. include the Proceedings of the association's 12th-27th annual conventions.

The Death and Life of Great American Cities

Author: Jane Jacobs

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 052543285X

Category: Social Science

Page: 480

View: 1793

Thirty years after its publication, The Death and Life of Great American Cities was described by The New York Times as "perhaps the most influential single work in the history of town planning....[It] can also be seen in a much larger context. It is first of all a work of literature; the descriptions of street life as a kind of ballet and the bitingly satiric account of traditional planning theory can still be read for pleasure even by those who long ago absorbed and appropriated the book's arguments." Jane Jacobs, an editor and writer on architecture in New York City in the early sixties, argued that urban diversity and vitality were being destroyed by powerful architects and city planners. Rigorous, sane, and delightfully epigrammatic, Jacobs's small masterpiece is a blueprint for the humanistic management of cities. It is sensible, knowledgeable, readable, indispensable. The author has written a new foreword for this Modern Library edition.

Death in Pozzuoli

Author: James Allan Evans

Publisher: Trafford Publishing

ISBN: 1425186564

Category: Fiction

Page: 240

View: 3045

Students at a summer school in Italy encounter intrigue, love and murder, taken along with an introduction to the Roman Empire and its archeological remains that are mute witnesses both to a storied past and a dangerous present-day

Life and Death in Hitler's Europe

Author: Jane Shuter

Publisher: Capstone Classroom

ISBN: 9781403432032

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 56

View: 6740

This series looks at all aspects of the Holocaust, from its roots to its ramifications. Readers confront the early racial doctrines of the Nazis; the step-by-step dehumanization of Jews; the implementation of the Final Solution; and contemporary views of the Holocaust. First-hand accounts and other primary source material are used extensively.

Death Confetti

Pickers, Punks, and Transit Ghosts in Portland, Oregon

Author: Jennifer Robin

Publisher: Feral House

ISBN: 1627310401

Category: Humor

Page: 220

View: 4355

With savage humor, Death Confetti features performance artist Jennifer Robin's autobiographical sketches of Portland, Oregon, from the grunge-era obscurity of the '90s to its current media-darling status. As an only child raised by reclusive grandparents in upstate New York, Jennifer recalls that she felt "anemic for the real." At seventeen she broke loose and made her way to the west coast. "Civilization is a nightmare-illusion," Jennifer writes, "a three-dimensional spreadsheet perpetuated by machines that hypnotize meat." In a city that's stranger than fiction, grocery-store checkers and meth-heads loom as lost gods. We're introduced to the lady tweaker "Chew Toy," who wears moon boots and sings hair metal songs all night as she collects recyclable bottles. Jennifer visits a bar where executives simulate doggie-style sex acts on the dance floor. Then there's all the tales of late-night life on the city's buses and light rail. Jennifer reflects on her early terror in Catholic school and phone calls with her far-out mother, who disclosed that her gynecologist was a murderer. In the all-too-true pages of Death Confetti, Robin remembers her life among noise musicians, junkies, and her escape from a boyfriend who insisted on reviving the lives of hundreds of deceased fruit flies. Death Confetti jolts the senses, and lingers like a mosquito bite to the Portland of everybody's soul.

Five Days at Memorial

Life and Death in a Storm-Ravaged Hospital

Author: Sheri Fink

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 0307718980

Category: Social Science

Page: 592

View: 2532

Pulitzer Prize winner Sheri Fink’s landmark investigation of patient deaths at a New Orleans hospital ravaged by Hurricane Katrina – and her suspenseful portrayal of the quest for truth and justice. In the tradition of the best investigative journalism, physician and reporter Sheri Fink reconstructs 5 days at Memorial Medical Center and draws the reader into the lives of those who struggled mightily to survive and maintain life amid chaos. After Katrina struck and the floodwaters rose, the power failed, and the heat climbed, exhausted caregivers chose to designate certain patients last for rescue. Months later, several of those caregivers faced criminal allegations that they deliberately injected numerous patients with drugs to hasten their deaths. Five Days at Memorial, the culmination of six years of reporting, unspools the mystery of what happened in those days, bringing the reader into a hospital fighting for its life and into a conversation about the most terrifying form of health care rationing. In a voice at once involving and fair, masterful and intimate, Fink exposes the hidden dilemmas of end-of-life care and reveals just how ill-prepared we are for the impact of large-scale disasters—and how we can do better. A remarkable book, engrossing from start to finish, Five Days at Memorial radically transforms your understanding of human nature in crisis. One of The New York Times' Best Ten Books of the Year