DPs

Europe's Displaced Persons, 1945–51

Author: Mark Wyman

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801456037

Category: History

Page: 257

View: 5029

"Wyman has written a highly readable account of the movement of diverse ethnic and cultural groups of Europe's displaced persons, 1945–1951. An analysis of the social, economic, and political circumstances within which relocation, resettlement, and repatriation of millions of people occurred, this study is equally a study in diplomacy, in international relations, and in social history. . . . A vivid and compassionate recreation of the events and circumstances within which displaced persons found themselves, of the strategies and means by which people survived or did not, and an account of the major powers in response to an unprecedented human crisis mark this as an important book."—Choice

U. S. Army and the Interagency Process: Historical Perspectives

The Proceedings of the Combat Studies Institute 2008 Military History Symposium

Author: Kendall D. Gott

Publisher: DIANE Publishing

ISBN: 1437923801

Category:

Page: 428

View: 8256

This symposium was held 16-18 Sept. 2008 at Fort Leavenworth, KS. The theme, ¿The U.S. Army and the Interagency Process: Historical Perspectives,¿ was designed to explore the partnership between the U.S. Army and government agencies in attaining national goals and objectives in peace and war within a historical context. The symposium also examined current issues, dilemmas, problems, trends, and practices associated with U.S. Army operations requiring interagency cooperation. In the midst of two wars and Army engagement in numerous other parts of a troubled world, this topic is of tremendous importance to the U.S. Army and the Nation. Charts and tables.

The New Life

Jewish Students of Postwar Germany

Author: Jeremy Varon

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN: 081433962X

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 6654

Jewish Displaced Persons (DPs) survived in concentration and death camps, in hiding, and as exiles in the Soviet interior. After liberation in the land of their persecutors, some also attended university to fulfill dreams of becoming doctors, engineers, and professionals. In The New Life: Jewish Students of Postwar Germany, Jeremy Varon tells the improbable story of the nearly eight hundred young Jews, mostly from Poland and orphaned by the Holocaust, who studied in universities in the American Zone of Occupied Germany. Drawing on interviews he conducted with the Jewish alumni in the United States and Israel and the records of their Student Union, Varon reconstructs how the students built a sense of purpose and a positive vision of the future even as the wounds of the past persisted. Varon explores the keys to students’ renewal, including education itself, the bond they enjoyed with one another as a substitute family, and their efforts both to reconnect with old passions and to revive a near-vanquished European Jewish intelligentsia. The New Life also explores the relationship between Jews and Germans in occupied Germany. Varon shows how mutual suspicion and resentment dominated interactions between the groups and explores the subtle ways anti-Semitism expressed itself just after the war. Moments of empathy also emerge, in which Germans began to reckon with the Nazi past. Finally, The New Life documents conflicts among Jews as they struggled to chart a collective future, while nationalists, both from Palestine and among DPs, insisted that Zionism needed “pioneers, not scholars,” and tried to force the students to quit their studies. Rigorously researched and passionately written, The New Life speaks to scholars, students, and general readers with interest in the Holocaust, Jewish and German history, the study of trauma, and the experiences of refugees displaced by war and genocide. With liberation nearly seventy years in the past, it is also among the very last studies based on living contact with Holocaust survivors.

Keeping a Low Profile

An Oral History of German Immigration to New Zealand

Author: Brigitte Bönisch-Brednich

Publisher: Victoria University Press

ISBN: 9780864734396

Category: History

Page: 351

View: 1988

"This oral history of German immigration to New Zealand is based on extensive field research, including 102 life history interviews and in-depth study of archival sources and secondary literature. Issues of national and individual identity are also addressed."

Place in Modern Jewish Culture and Society

Author: Richard I. Cohen

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190912626

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 6287

Notions of place have always permeated Jewish life and consciousness. The Babylonian Talmud was pitted against the Jerusalem Talmud; the worlds of Sepharad and Ashkenaz were viewed as two pillars of the Jewish experience; the diaspora was conceived as a wholly different experience from that of Eretz Israel; and Jews from Eastern Europe and "German Jews" were often seen as mirror opposites, whereas Jews under Islam were often characterized pejoratively, especially because of their allegedly uncultured surroundings. Place, or makom, is a strategic opportunity to explore the tensions that characterize Jewish culture in modernity, between the sacred and the secular, the local and the global, the historical and the virtual, Jewish culture and others. The plasticity of the term includes particular geographic places and their cultural landscapes, theological allusions, and an array of other symbolic relations between locus, location, and the production of culture. The 30th volume of Studies in Contemporary Jewry includes twelve essays that deal with various aspects of particular places, making each location a focal point for understanding Jewish life and culture. Scholars from the United States, Europe, and Israel have used their disciplinary skills to shed light on the vicissitudes of the 20th century in relation to place and Jewish culture. Their essays continue the ongoing discussion in this realm and provide further insights into the historiographical turn in Jewish studies.

No Return, No Refuge

Rites and Rights in Minority Repatriation

Author: Howard Adelman,Elazar Barkan

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231526903

Category: Political Science

Page: 336

View: 3843

Refugee displacement is a global phenomenon that has uprooted millions of individuals over the past century. In the 1980s, repatriation became the preferred option for resolving the refugee crisis. As human rights achieved global eminence, refugees' right of return fell under its umbrella. Yet return as a right and its practice as a rite created a radical disconnect between principle and everyday practice, and the repatriation of refugees and Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) remains elusive in cases of forced displacement of victims by ethnic conflict. Reviewing cases of ethnic displacement throughout the twentieth century in Europe, Asia, and Africa, Howard Adelman and Elazar Barkan juxtapose the empirical lack of repatriation in cases of ethnic conflict, unless accompanied by coercion. The emphasis on repatriation during the last several decades has obscured other options, leaving refugees to spend years warehoused in camps. Repatriation takes place when identity, defined by ethnicity or religion, is not at the center of the displacing conflict, or when the ethnic group to which the refugees belong are not a minority in their original country or in the region to which they want to return. Rather than perpetuate a ritual belief in return as a right without the prospect of realization, Adelman and Barkan call for solutions that bracket return as a primary focus in cases of ethnic conflict.

Jüdische Lebenswelten 1945-1955

Flüchtlinge in der amerikanischen Zone Österreichs

Author: Susanne Rolinek

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783706519243

Category: Austria

Page: 215

View: 6073

Outcast Europe

Refugees and Relief Workers in an Era of Total War 1936-48

Author: Sharif Gemie,Laure Humbert,Fiona Reid

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1441142134

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 7266

The period of the 'long' Second World War (1936-1948) was marked by mass movements of diverse populations: 60 million people either fled or were forced from their homes. This book considers the Spanish Republicans fleeing Franco's Spain in 1939, the French civilians trying to escape the Nazi invasion in 1940, and the millions of people displaced or expelled by the forces of Hitler's Third Reich. Throughout this period state and voluntary organisations were created to take care of the homeless and the displaced. National organisations dominated until the end of the war; afterwards, international organisations - the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Agency and the International Refugee Organisation - were formed to deal with what was clearly an international problem. Using case studies of displaced people and of relief workers, this book is unique in placing such crises at the centre rather than the margins of wartime experience, making the work nothing less than an alternative history of the Second World War.

Zwangsarbeit in Deutschland

1939-1945 : Archiv- und Sammlungsgut, Topografie und Erschliessungsstrategien

Author: Wilfried Reininghaus,Norbert Reimann

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783895344282

Category: Forced labor

Page: 288

View: 2686

Fremdarbeiter

Politik un Praxis des "Ausländer-Einsatzes" in der Kriegswirtschaft des Dritten Reiches

Author: Ulrich Herbert

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Alien labor

Page: 589

View: 5592

Befreit, aber nicht in Freiheit.

Displaced Persons im Emsland 1945-1950.

Author: Andreas Lembeck,Klaus Wessels

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783861083214

Category: Refugees

Page: 224

View: 2803

Der Weg zurück

die Repatriierung sowjetischer Zwangsarbeiter und Kriegsgefangener während und nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg

Author: Ulrike Goeken-Haidl

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Ex-prisoners of war

Page: 573

View: 4292

Insofern leistet der Band auch einen Beitrag zur GULAG-Geschichte und zeigt darüber hinaus den Wirkungszusammenhang von Denunziation, Mißtrauen und der daraus resultierenden Deformation der sowjetischen Gesellschaft auf Mikro- und Makroebene auf. Ulrike Goeken-Haidl liefert auf Basis intensiver Archivrecherchen u. a. in Moskau, Minsk und den Vereinigten Staaten einen Beitrag zur sowjetischen Diktatur- und Totalitarismusforschung sowie der Entstehungs-Geschichte des Kalten Krieges. Wie eine Vielzahl anderer Akten zur Stalinismus-Geschichte sind die für das Buch 1996/97 eingesehenen Akten seit dem Machtantritt Putins nicht mehr zugänglich. So gelang gleichsam ein Blick hinter den Eisernen Vorhang, der in dieser Form heute nicht mehr möglich ist.

Hotel Bolivia

auf den Spuren der Erinnerung an eine Zuflucht vor dem Nationalsozialismus

Author: Leo Spitzer

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783854524731

Category: Bolivia

Page: 333

View: 3068

Born of Austrian Jewish refugees in Boliva, the author tells of his childhood and his parents' flight from Austria and their new lives in Bolivia. He also examines the effects of displacement of Jewish refugees in a foreign country.

ORT, the Second World War and the Rehabilitation of Holocaust Survivors

Author: Sarah Kavanaugh

Publisher: Mitchell Vallentine

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 156

View: 8198

This book centres on the role played by ORT in the rehabilitation of Holocaust survivors inside the Displaced Persons (DP) camps after the Second World War. A brief history of the ORT organisation is followed by the author highlighting ORT's work during the 1920s and 1930s, using Berlin as a case study. The important and often life-saving work carried out by ORT workers inside the ghettos of Eastern Europe, primarily in Warsaw and Kovno, is then examined. The book then focuses on the liberation of the concentration camps, the set-up of the post-war allied zones of occupation, the establishment of the DP camps, and ORT's arrival within them. The mature period of ORT's work in the DP camps is then covered, looking at Belsen in the British zone of occupation and Landsberg in the American zone. The book also explores ORT's work in Austria and Italy. The final chapter highlights the closure of the DP camps, the subsequent immigration of the DPs, and the creation of the State of Israel.

The Liberation of the Camps

The End of the Holocaust and Its Aftermath

Author: Dan Stone

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300216033

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 4562

Seventy years have passed since the tortured inmates of Hitler’s concentration and extermination camps were liberated. When the horror of the atrocities came fully to light, it was easy for others to imagine the joyful relief of freed prisoners. Yet for those who had survived the unimaginable, the experience of liberation was a slow, grueling journey back to life. In this unprecedented inquiry into the days, months, and years following the arrival of Allied forces at the Nazi camps, a foremost historian of the Holocaust draws on archival sources and especially on eyewitness testimonies to reveal the complex challenges liberated victims faced and the daunting tasks their liberators undertook to help them reclaim their shattered lives. Historian Dan Stone focuses on the survivors—their feelings of guilt, exhaustion, fear, shame for having survived, and devastating grief for lost family members; their immense medical problems; and their later demands to be released from Displaced Persons camps and resettled in countries of their own choosing. Stone also tracks the efforts of British, American, Canadian, and Russian liberators as they contended with survivors’ immediate needs, then grappled with longer-term issues that shaped the postwar world and ushered in the first chill of the Cold War years ahead.

Displaced Persons (DPs)

Autoritäten und Anführer im angehenden Kalten Krieg im östlichen Bayern

Author: Roman P. Smolorz

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: East Europeans

Page: 146

View: 9798

The Polish Review

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Polish philology

Page: N.A

View: 3699