Eating Culture

An Anthropological Guide to Food, Second Edition

Author: Gillian Crowther

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1487593295

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 6419

From ingredients and recipes to meals and menus across time and space, Eating Culture is a highly engaging overview that illustrates the important role that anthropology and anthropologists have played in understanding food, as well as the key role that food plays in the study of culture. The new edition, now with a full-color interior, introduces discussions about nomadism, commercializing food, food security, and ethical consumption, including treatment of animals and the long-term environmental and health consequences of meat consumption. "Grist to the Mill" sections at the end of each chapter provide further readings and "Food for Thought" case studies and exercises help to highlight anthropological methods and approaches. By considering the concept of cuisine and public discourse, this practical guide brings order and insight to our changing relationship with food.

Eating Culture

An Anthropological Guide to Food, Second Edition

Author: Gillian Crowther

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1487593317

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 1490

From ingredients and recipes to meals and menus across time and space, this highly engaging overview illustrates the important roles that anthropology and anthropologists play in understanding food and its key place in the study of culture. The new edition, now in full colour, introduces discussions about nomadism, commercializing food, food security, and ethical consumption, including treatment of animals and the long-term environmental and health consequences of meat consumption. New feature boxes offer case studies and exercises to help highlight anthropological methods and approaches, and each chapter includes a further reading section. By considering the concept of cuisine and public discourse, Eating Culture brings order and insight to our changing relationship with food.

Eating Culture

An Anthropological Guide to Food

Author: Gillian Crowther

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442604670

Category: Social Science

Page: 360

View: 2691

Humans have an appetite for food, and anthropology—as the study of human beings, their culture, and society—has an interest in the role of food. From ingredients and recipes to meals and menus across time and space, Eating Culture is a highly engaging overview that illustrates the important role that anthropology and anthropologists have played in understanding food. Organized around the sometimes elusive concept of cuisine and the public discourse—on gastronomy, nutrition, sustainability, and culinary skills—that surrounds it, this practical guide to anthropological method and theory brings order and insight to our changing relationship with food.

Food and Culture

A Reader

Author: Carole Counihan,Penny Van Esterik

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0415521033

Category: Social Science

Page: 631

View: 9253

The classic bookthat helped to define and legitimize the field of food and culture studies is now available, with major revisions, in a specially affordable e-book version (978-0-203-07975-1).ee The third edition includes 40 original essays and reprints of previously published classics under 5 Sections: FOUNDATIONS, HEGEMONY AND DIFFERENCE, CONSUMPTION AND EMBODIMENT, FOOD AND GLOBALIZATION, and CHALLENGING, CONTESTING, AND TRANSFORMING THE FOOD SYSTEM. 17 of the 40 articles included are either, new to this edition, rewritten by their original authors, or edited by Counihan and van Esterik.ee A bank of test items applicable to each article in the book is available to instructors interested in selecting this edition for course use. Simply send an e.mail to the publisher at [email protected]

Food

Ethnographic Encounters

Author: Leo Coleman

Publisher: Berg

ISBN: 1847889077

Category: Social Science

Page: 192

View: 3028

Food preparation, consumption, and exchange are eminently social practices, and experiencing another cuisine often provides our first encounter with a different culture. This volume presents fascinating essays about cooking, eating, and sharing food, by anthropologists working in many parts of the world, exploring what they learned by eating with others. These are accounts of specific experiences - of cooking in Mombasa, shopping for organic produce in Vienna, eating vegetarian in Vietnam, raising and selling chickens in Hong Kong, and of refugees subsisting on food aid. With a special focus on the experience and challenge of ethnographic fieldwork, the essays cover a wide range of topics in food studies and anthropology, including food safety and food security, cultural diversity and globalization, colonial histories and contemporary identities, and changing ecological, social, and political relations across cultures. Food: Ethnographic Encounters offers readers a broad view of the vibrancy of local and global food cultures, and provides an accessible introduction to both food studies and contemporary ethnography.

Everyone Eats

Understanding Food and Culture, Second Edition

Author: E. N. Anderson

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814789161

Category: Social Science

Page: 362

View: 2768

Everyone eats, but rarely do we investigate why we eat what we eat. Why do we love spices, sweets, coffee? How did rice become such a staple food throughout so much of eastern Asia? Everyone Eats examines the social and cultural reasons for our food choices and provides an explanation of the nutritional reasons for why humans eat what they do, resulting in a unique cultural and biological approach to the topic. E. N. Anderson explains the economics of food in the globalization era; food’s relationship to religion, medicine, and ethnicity; and offers suggestions on how to end hunger, starvation, and malnutrition. This thoroughly updated Second Edition incorporates the latest food scholarship, most notably recognizing the impact of sustainable eating advocacy and the state of food security in the world today. Anderson also brings more insight than ever before into the historical and scientific underpinnings of our food customs, fleshing this out with fifteen new and original photographs from his own extensive fieldwork. A perennial classic in the anthropology of food, Everyone Eats feeds our need to understand human ecology by explaining the ways that cultures and political systems structure the edible environment.

100 Million Years of Food

What Our Ancestors Ate and Why It Matters Today

Author: Stephen Le

Publisher: Picador

ISBN: 1250050421

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 7141

A fascinating tour through the evolution of the human diet, and how we can improve our health by understanding our complicated history with food. There are few areas of modern life that are burdened by as much information and advice, often contradictory, as our diet and health: eat a lot of meat, eat no meat; whole-grains are healthy, whole-grains are a disaster; eat everything in moderation; eat only certain foods--and on and on. In 100 Million Years of Food biological anthropologist Stephen Le explains how cuisines of different cultures are a result of centuries of evolution, finely tuned to our biology and surroundings. Today many cultures have strayed from their ancestral diets, relying instead on mass-produced food often made with chemicals that may be contributing to a rise in so-called "Western diseases," such as cancer, heart disease, and obesity. Travelling around the world to places as far-flung as Vietnam, Kenya, India, and the US, Stephen Le introduces us to people who are growing, cooking, and eating food using both traditional and modern methods, striving for a sustainable, healthy diet. In clear, compelling arguments based on scientific research, Le contends that our ancestral diets provide the best first line of defense in protecting our health and providing a balanced diet. Fast-food diets, as well as strict regimens like paleo or vegan, in effect highjack our biology and ignore the complex nature of our bodies. In 100 Million Years of Food Le takes us on a guided tour of evolution, demonstrating how our diets are the result of millions of years of history, and how we can return to a sustainable, healthier way of eating.

Stories of Culture and Place: An Introduction to Anthropology, 2nd Ed.

Author: Michael G. Kenny and Kirsten Smillie

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1487593716

Category: SOCIAL SCIENCE

Page: N.A

View: 5673

"This original introduction to cultural anthropology is a textbook like no other. Structured more as a narrative rather than a compendium of facts about cultures and concepts, it invites students to think of anthropology as a series of stories that emerge from cultural encounters in particular times and places. These moments of encounter are illustrated with reference to both classic and contemporary ethnographic examples-from Coming of Age in Samoa to Coming of Age in Second Life-allowing readers to grasp anthropology's sometimes problematic past, while still capturing the excitement and potential of the discipline. The second edition has been updated throughout with fresh ethnographic examples, and features a new introduction, and two new chapters - one on economic anthropology and exchange, and one on health and medicine. As well, an end-of-book Glossary has been added for quick reference. The result is a more streamlined book that offers thorough coverage but is manageable to teach."--

Food in the USA

A Reader

Author: Carole Counihan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135323593

Category: Social Science

Page: 442

View: 823

From Thanksgiving to fast food to the Passover seder, Food in the USA brings together the essential readings on these topics and is the only substantial collection of essays on food and culture in the United States. Essay topics include the globalization of U.S. food; the dangers of the meatpacking industry; the rise of Italian-American food; the meaning of Soul food; the anorexia epidemic; the omnipotence of Coca-Cola; and the invention of Thanksgiving. Together, the collection provides a fascinating look at how and why we Americans are what we eat.

Food in World History

Author: Jeffrey M. Pilcher

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317514505

Category: History

Page: 164

View: 8186

The second edition of this concise survey offers a comparative and comprehensive study of culinary cultures and food politics throughout the world, from ancient times to the present day. It examines the long history of globalization of foods as well as the political, social, and environmental implications of our changing relationship with food, showing how hunger and taste have been driving forces in human history.? Including numerous case studies from diverse societies and periods, Food in World History explores such questions as: What social factors have historically influenced culinary globalization? How did early modern plantations establish patterns for modern industrial food production? Were eighteenth-century food riots comparable to contemporary social movements around food? Did Italian and Chinese migrant cooks sacrifice authenticity to gain social acceptance in the Americas? Have genetically modified foods fulfilled the promises made by proponents? This new edition includes expanded discussions of gender and the family, indigeneity, and the politics of food. Expanded chapters on contemporary food systems and culinary pluralism examine debates over the concentration of corporate control over seeds and marketing, authenticity and exoticism within the culinary tourism industry, and the impact of social media on restaurants and home cooks.

Conversations in Food Studies

Author: Colin R. Anderson,Jennifer Brady,Charles Z. Levkoe

Publisher: Univ. of Manitoba Press

ISBN: 088755542X

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 8973

Few things are as important as the food we eat. "Conversations in Food Studies" demonstrates the value of interdisciplinary research through the cross-pollination of disciplinary, epistemological, and methodological perspectives. Widely diverse essays, ranging from the meaning of milk, to the bring-your-own-wine movement, to urban household waste, are the product of collaborating teams of interdisciplinary authors. Readers are invited to engage and reflect on the theories and practices underlying some of the most important issues facing the emerging field of foodstudies today. Conversations in Food Studies brings to the table thirteen original contributions organized around the themes of representation, governance, disciplinary boundaries, and, finally, learning through food. This collection offers an important and groundbreaking approach to food studies as it examines and reworks the boundaries that have traditionally structured the academy and that underlie much of food studies literature.

Edible Ideologies

Representing Food and Meaning

Author: Kathleen LeBesco,Peter Naccarato

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 0791479110

Category:

Page: 266

View: 7110

Contributors explore the relationship between food and the production of ideology. Edible Ideologies argues that representations of food—in literature and popular fiction, cookbooks and travel guides, war propaganda, women’s magazines, television and print advertisements—are not just about nourishment or pleasure. Contributors explore how these various modes of representation, reflecting prevailing attitudes and assumptions about food and food practices, function instead to circulate and transgress dominant cultural ideologies. Addressing questions concerning whose interests are served by a particular food practice or habit and what political ends are fulfilled by the historical changes that lead from one practice to another in Western culture, the essays offer a rich historical narrative that moves from the construction of the nineteenth-century English gentleman to the creation of two of today’s iconic figures in food culture, Julia Child and Martha Stewart. Along the way, readers will encounter World War I propaganda, holocaust and Sephardic cookbooks, the Rosenbergs, German tour guides, fast food advertising, food packaging, and chocolate, and will find food for thought on the meanings of everything from camembert to Velveeta, from salads to burgers, and from tikka masala to Campbell’s soup. “The contributions to Edible Ideologies show a richness of concrete argument … Vividly and vibrantly, the essays … reveal multitudes of meaning.” — Gastronomica “…this collection moves beyond the scope of ‘food studies’ to be of interest to readers in literature, gender studies, sociology, advertising history, and related disciplines.” — CHOICE “This is a solid intervention in contemporary debates about food and representation in the Anglo-American world. The essays are historically rich, theoretically engaging, and unpredictable enough to be immensely readable. Who knew that a box of Jell-O would do so much harm to Ethel Rosenberg’s case?!” — Krishnendu Ray, author of The Migrant’s Table: Meals and Memories in Bengali-American Households Contributors include Nathan Abrams, Annette Cozzi, Marie I. Drews, Charlene Elliott, Lynne Fallwell, Celia M. Kingsbury, Kathleen LeBesco, Eric Mason, Peter Naccarato, Kathleen Banks Nutter, and Jean P. Retzinger.

The Cultural Politics of Food and Eating

A Reader

Author: James L. Watson,Melissa L. Caldwell

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9780631230922

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 5293

The Cultural Politics of Food and Eating offers an ethnographically informed perspective on the ways in which people use food to make sense of life in an increasingly interconnected world. Uses food as a central idiom for teaching about culture and addresses broad themes such as globalization, capitalism, market economies, and consumption practices Spanning 5 continents, features studies from 11 countries—Japan, China, Russia, Ukraine, Germany, France, Burkina Faso, Chile, Trinidad, Mexico, and the United States Offers discussion of such hot topics as sushi, fast food, gourmet foods, and food scares and contamination

Teaching Food and Culture

Author: Candice Lowe Swift,Richard R Wilk

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315419394

Category: Social Science

Page: 213

View: 6066

With the rapid growth and interest in food studies around the U.S. and globally, the original essays in this one-of-a-kind volume aid instructors in expanding their teaching to include both the latest scholarship and engage with public debate around issues related to food. The chapters represent the product of original efforts to develop ways to teach both with and about food in the classroom, written by innovative instructors who have successfully done so. It would appeal to community college and university instructors in anthropology and social science disciplines who currently teach or want to develop food-related courses. This book -illustrates the creative ways that college instructors have tackled teaching about food and used food as an instructional device;-aims to train the next generation of food scholars to deal with the complex problems of feeding an ever-increasing population -contains an interview with Sidney Mintz, the most influential anthropologist shaping the study of food

Nutritional Anthropology

Biocultural Perspectives on Food and Nutrition

Author: Darna L. Dufour,Alan H. Goodman,Gretel H. Pelto

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199738144

Category: Social Science

Page: 532

View: 4702

Revised for the first time in ten years, the second edition of Nutritional Anthropology: Biocultural Perspectives on Food and Nutrition continues to blend biological and cultural approaches to this dynamic discipline. While this revision maintains the format and philosophy that grounded the first edition, the text has been revamped and revitalized with new and updated readings, sections, introductions, and pedagogical materials that cover the current global food trade and persistent problems of hunger in equal measure. Unlike any other book on the market, Nutritional Anthropology fuses issues past and present, local and global, and biological and cultural in order to give students a comprehensive foundation in food and nutrition. NEW TO THIS EDITION - Seven original essays written specifically for this book - Completely revised sets of readings, section introductions, and pedagogical material - Maps showing the locations of case studies - A new section, Looking for Solutions," helps students solve issues relating to food and nutrition"

Anthropology of Food

The Social Dynamics of Food Security

Author: Johan Pottier

Publisher: Polity

ISBN: 9780745615349

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 5855

In this new book, Pottier provides an incisive account of food production and famine in the world today. Drawing on the work of anthropologists and other sources, he offers a wide-ranging account of the methods used to produce and distribute food in a variety of cultural and historical contexts, from India to sub-Saharan Africa.

The Handbook of Food and Anthropology

Author: Jakob Klein,James L. Watson

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 0857855948

Category: Social Science

Page: 496

View: 3546

Interest in the anthropology of food has grown significantly in recent years. This is the first handbook to provide a detailed overview of all major areas of the field. Twenty original essays by leading figures in the discipline examine traditional areas of research as well as cutting-edge areas of inquiry. Divided into three parts – Food, Self and Others; Food Security, Nutrition and Food Safety; Food as Craft, Industry and Ethics – the book covers topics such as identity, commensality, locality, migration, ethical consumption, artisanal foods, and children's food. Each chapter features rich ethnography alongside wider analysis of the subject. Internationally renowned scholars offer insights into their core areas of specialty. Examples include Michael Herzfeld on culinary stereotypes, David Sutton on how to conduct an anthropology of cooking, Johan Pottier on food insecurity, and Melissa Caldwell on practicing food anthropology. The book also features exceptional geographic and cultural diversity, with chapters on South Asia, South Africa, the United States of America, post-socialist societies, Maoist China, and Muslim and Jewish foodways. Invaluable as a reference as well as for teaching, The Handbook of Food and Anthropology serves to define this increasingly important field. An essential resource for researchers and students in anthropology and food studies.

Food

The Key Concepts

Author: Warren Belasco

Publisher: Berg

ISBN: 1845206738

Category: Social Science

Page: 158

View: 3408

Food: The Key Concepts presents an exciting, coherent and interdisciplinary introduction to food studies for the beginning reader. Food Studies is an increasingly complex field, drawing on disciplines as diverse as Sociology, Anthropology and Cultural Studies at one end and Economics, Politics and Agricultural Science at the other. In order to clarify the issues, Food: The Key Concepts distills food choices down to three competing considerations: consumer identity; matters of convenience and price; and an awareness of the consequences of what is consumed. The book concludes with an examination of two very different future scenarios for feeding the world's population: the technological fix, which looks to science to provide the solution to our future food needs; and the anthropological fix, which hopes to change our expectations and behaviors. Throughout, the analysis is illustrated with lively case studies. Bulleted chapter summaries, questions and guides to further reading are also provided.

The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu

Author: Dan Jurafsky

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 039324587X

Category: Cooking

Page: 256

View: 7940

A 2015 James Beard Award Finalist: "Eye-opening, insightful, and huge fun to read." —Bee Wilson, author of Consider the Fork Why do we eat toast for breakfast, and then toast to good health at dinner? What does the turkey we eat on Thanksgiving have to do with the country on the eastern Mediterranean? Can you figure out how much your dinner will cost by counting the words on the menu? In The Language of Food, Stanford University professor and MacArthur Fellow Dan Jurafsky peels away the mysteries from the foods we think we know. Thirteen chapters evoke the joy and discovery of reading a menu dotted with the sharp-eyed annotations of a linguist. Jurafsky points out the subtle meanings hidden in filler words like "rich" and "crispy," zeroes in on the metaphors and storytelling tropes we rely on in restaurant reviews, and charts a microuniverse of marketing language on the back of a bag of potato chips. The fascinating journey through The Language of Food uncovers a global atlas of culinary influences. With Jurafsky's insight, words like ketchup, macaron, and even salad become living fossils that contain the patterns of early global exploration that predate our modern fusion-filled world. From ancient recipes preserved in Sumerian song lyrics to colonial shipping routes that first connected East and West, Jurafsky paints a vibrant portrait of how our foods developed. A surprising history of culinary exchange—a sharing of ideas and culture as much as ingredients and flavors—lies just beneath the surface of our daily snacks, soups, and suppers. Engaging and informed, Jurafsky's unique study illuminates an extraordinary network of language, history, and food. The menu is yours to enjoy.

Edible Identities: Food as Cultural Heritage

Author: Ronda L. Brulotte,Michael A. Di Giovine

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317145992

Category: Social Science

Page: 252

View: 8908

Food - its cultivation, preparation and communal consumption - has long been considered a form of cultural heritage. A dynamic, living product, food creates social bonds as it simultaneously marks off and maintains cultural difference. In bringing together anthropologists, historians and other scholars of food and heritage, this volume closely examines the ways in which the cultivation, preparation, and consumption of food is used to create identity claims of 'cultural heritage' on local, regional, national and international scales. Contributors explore a range of themes, including how food is used to mark insiders and outsiders within an ethnic group; how the same food's meanings change within a particular society based on class, gender or taste; and how traditions are 'invented' for the revitalization of a community during periods of cultural pressure. Featuring case studies from Europe, Asia and the Americas, this timely volume also addresses the complex processes of classifying, designating, and valorizing food as 'terroir,' 'slow food,' or as intangible cultural heritage through UNESCO. By effectively analyzing food and foodways through the perspectives of critical heritage studies, this collection productively brings two overlapping but frequently separate theoretical frameworks into conversation.