Friends Or Strangers

The Impact of Immigrants on the U.S. Economy

Author: George J. Borjas

Publisher: Basic Books (AZ)

ISBN: N.A

Category: Alien labor

Page: 274

View: 3302

Borjas (economics, U. of California, Santa Barbara) provides a pinched, crabby, misanthropic and xenophobic account of immigration that will likely please political conservatives, social troglodytes, and greedy entrepreneurs. Basically, he bemoans the low quality of recent immigrant labor, and, implicitly at least, the low quality of the immigrants themselves. Where did his family come from? Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

The Economic Consequences of Immigration

Author: Julian Lincoln Simon

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472086160

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 434

View: 3915

Argues convincingly that immigration continues to benefit U.S. natives as well as most developed countries

Heaven's Door

Immigration Policy and the American Economy

Author: George J. Borjas

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 140084150X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 296

View: 8408

The U.S. took in more than a million immigrants per year in the late 1990s, more than at any other time in history. For humanitarian and many other reasons, this may be good news. But as George Borjas shows in Heaven's Door, it's decidedly mixed news for the American economy--and positively bad news for the country's poorest citizens. Widely regarded as the country's leading immigration economist, Borjas presents the most comprehensive, accessible, and up-to-date account yet of the economic impact of recent immigration on America. He reveals that the benefits of immigration have been greatly exaggerated and that, if we allow immigration to continue unabated and unmodified, we are supporting an astonishing transfer of wealth from the poorest people in the country, who are disproportionately minorities, to the richest. In the course of the book, Borjas carefully analyzes immigrants' skills, national origins, welfare use, economic mobility, and impact on the labor market, and he makes groundbreaking use of new data to trace current trends in ethnic segregation. He also evaluates the implications of the evidence for the type of immigration policy the that U.S. should pursue. Some of his findings are dramatic: Despite estimates that range into hundreds of billions of dollars, net annual gains from immigration are only about $8 billion. In dragging down wages, immigration currently shifts about $160 billion per year from workers to employers and users of immigrants' services. Immigrants today are less skilled than their predecessors, more likely to re-quire public assistance, and far more likely to have children who remain in poor, segregated communities. Borjas considers the moral arguments against restricting immigration and writes eloquently about his own past as an immigrant from Cuba. But he concludes that in the current economic climate--which is less conducive to mass immigration of unskilled labor than past eras--it would be fair and wise to return immigration to the levels of the 1970s (roughly 500,000 per year) and institute policies to favor more skilled immigrants.

Immigration Economics

Author: George J. Borjas

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674369912

Category: Business & Economics

Page: N.A

View: 3482

Nearly 3% of the world's population no longer live in the country where they were born. George Borjas synthesizes the theories, models, and econometric methods used to identify the causes and consequences of international labor flows, and lays out with clarity a full spectrum of topics with crucial implications for framing debates over immigration.

Strangers Among Us

Latino Lives in a Changing America

Author: Roberto Suro

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0679744568

Category: History

Page: 357

View: 1611

Beginning with the advent of Puerto Ricans in America in the fifties, a lucid evaluation of recent Latino immigration and its dramatic effects on America touches on such issues as bilingualism, assimilation, poverty, welfare, and ethnic consciousness. Reprint.

Economic Research on the Determinants of Immigration

Lessons for the European Union

Author: George J. Borjas

Publisher: World Bank Publications

ISBN: 9780821345047

Category: Social Science

Page: 27

View: 9812

This publication summarizes some of the key research findings from current literature and applies the lessons from it to the potential migration problem faced by countries in the EU. Its main objective is to present a review of existing economic theory and empirical evidence to evaluate the likelihood of migration flows from acceding or neighboring countries toward the current EU member states. This publication is a Technical Paper sponsored by the Poverty Reduction and Economic Management Network of the World Bank's Europe and Central Asia Division. It is part of a comprehensive series regarding the many important factors that influence European Union (EU) accession in the Central and East European countries (CEEC). The topics in the series cover both the social and economic aspects of accession across a broad range of sectors. The series also provides background information for specific acceding countries. These publications will be of interest to EU member and candidate countries, their ministries, and any one studying the accession issue.

Welcoming the Stranger

Justice, Compassion & Truth in the Immigration Debate

Author: Matthew Soerens,Jenny Hwang Yang

Publisher: InterVarsity Press

ISBN: 0830878408

Category: Religion

Page: 242

View: 3142

Immigration is one of the most complicated issues of our time. Voices on all sides argue strongly for action and change. Christians find themselves torn between the desire to uphold laws and the call to minister to the vulnerable. In this book World Relief staffers Matthew Soerens and Jenny Hwang move beyond the rhetoric to offer a Christian response to immigration. They put a human face on the issue and tell stories of immigrants' experiences in and out of the system. With careful historical understanding and thoughtful policy analysis, they debunk myths and misconceptions about immigration and show the limitations of the current immigration system. Ultimately they point toward immigration reform that is compassionate, sensible and just, as they offer concrete ways for you and your church to welcome and minister to your immigrant neighbors.

Guarding the Golden Door

American Immigration Policy and Immigrants since 1882

Author: Roger Daniels

Publisher: Hill and Wang

ISBN: 1466806850

Category: Social Science

Page: 344

View: 8685

As renowned historian Roger Daniels shows in this brilliant new work, America's inconsistent, often illogical, and always cumbersome immigration policy has profoundly affected our recent past. The federal government's efforts to pick and choose among the multitude of immigrants seeking to enter the United States began with the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. Conceived in ignorance and falsely presented to the public, it had undreamt of consequences, and this pattern has been rarely deviated from since. Immigration policy in Daniels' skilled hands shows Americans at their best and worst, from the nativist violence that forced Theodore Roosevelt's 1907 "gentlemen's agreement" with Japan to the generous refugee policies adopted after World War Two and throughout the Cold War. And in a conclusion drawn from today's headlines, Daniels makes clear how far ignorance, partisan politics, and unintended consequences have overtaken immigration policy during the current administration's War on Terror. Irreverent, deeply informed, and authoritative, Guarding the Golden Door presents an unforgettable interpretation of modern American history.

The Integration of Immigrants into American Society

Author: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine,Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education,Committee on Population,Panel on the Integration of Immigrants into American Society

Publisher: National Academies Press

ISBN: 0309373980

Category: Social Science

Page: 458

View: 7850

The United States prides itself on being a nation of immigrants, and the country has a long history of successfully absorbing people from across the globe. The integration of immigrants and their children contributes to our economic vitality and our vibrant and ever changing culture. We have offered opportunities to immigrants and their children to better themselves and to be fully incorporated into our society and in exchange immigrants have become Americans - embracing an American identity and citizenship, protecting our country through service in our military, fostering technological innovation, harvesting its crops, and enriching everything from the nation's cuisine to its universities, music, and art. Today, the 41 million immigrants in the United States represent 13.1 percent of the U.S. population. The U.S.-born children of immigrants, the second generation, represent another 37.1 million people, or 12 percent of the population. Thus, together the first and second generations account for one out of four members of the U.S. population. Whether they are successfully integrating is therefore a pressing and important question. Are new immigrants and their children being well integrated into American society, within and across generations? Do current policies and practices facilitate their integration? How is American society being transformed by the millions of immigrants who have arrived in recent decades? To answer these questions, this new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine summarizes what we know about how immigrants and their descendants are integrating into American society in a range of areas such as education, occupations, health, and language.

The Economics of Immigration

Market-Based Approaches, Social Science, and Public Policy

Author: Benjamin Powell

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0190258799

Category: BUSINESS & ECONOMICS

Page: 272

View: 4199

"A study of the economics of immigration"--

Strangers Next Door

Immigration, Migration and Mission

Author: J. D. Payne

Publisher: InterVarsity Press

ISBN: 0830863419

Category: Religion

Page: 206

View: 8440

More than ever, North America is being flooded by people from all around the world, many of them here illegally. How should the church respond to these sojourners among us? In Strangers Next Door professor of evangelism and church planting J. D. Payne introduces the phenomenon of migrations of peoples to Western nations and explores how the church should respond in light of the mission of God. As we understand and embrace the fact that the least-reached people groups now reside in (and continue to migrate to) Western countries, churches have unprecedented opportunites to freely share the gospel with them. This book includes practical guidelines for doing crosscultural missions and developing a global strategy of mission. It also highlights examples of churches and organizations attempting to reach, partner with, and send migrants to minister to their people. Discover how you can reach out to the strangers next door by welcoming them into God's family.

Strangers in Our Midst

Author: David Miller Miller

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674969804

Category: Philosophy

Page: 228

View: 394

How should democracies respond to the millions who want to settle in their societies? David Miller’s analysis reframes immigration as a question of political philosophy. Acknowledging the impact on host countries, he defends the right of states to control their borders and decide the future size, shape, and cultural make-up of their populations.

Strangers in Their Own Land

Anger and Mourning on the American Right

Author: Arlie Russell Hochschild

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1620973987

Category: Political Science

Page: 395

View: 1050

2016 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST FOR NONFICTION A 2016 NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A NEWSDAY TOP 10 BOOK OF THE YEAR A KIRKUS BEST BOOK OF 2016 One of "6 Books to Understand Trump's Win" according to the New York Times the day after the election The National Book Award Finalist and New York Times bestseller that became a guide and balm for a country struggling to understand the election of Donald Trump When Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election, a bewildered nation turned to Strangers in Their Own Land to understand what Trump voters were thinking when they cast their ballots. Arlie Hochschild, one of the most influential sociologists of her generation, had spent the preceding five years immersed in the community around Lake Charles, Louisiana, a Tea Party stronghold. As Jedediah Purdy put it in the New Republic, “Hochschild is fascinated by how people make sense of their lives. . . . [Her] attentive, detailed portraits . . . reveal a gulf between Hochchild’s ‘strangers in their own land’ and a new elite.” Already a favorite common read book in communities and on campuses across the country and called “humble and important” by David Brooks and “masterly” by Atul Gawande, Hochschild’s book has been lauded by Noam Chomsky, New Orleans mayor Mitch Landrieu, and countless others. The paperback edition features a new afterword by the author reflecting on the election of Donald Trump and the other events that have unfolded both in Louisiana and around the country since the hardcover edition was published, and also includes a readers’ group guide at the back of the book.

Enrique's Journey

The True Story of a Boy Determined to Reunite with His Mother

Author: Sonia Nazario

Publisher: Ember

ISBN: 0385743289

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 273

View: 4937

Documents the journey of a Honduran teen who braved hardship and peril to reunite with his mother after she was forced to leave him behind and seek migratory work in the United States.

Battleground

Author: Michael Walden,Peg Thoms

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313340659

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 6985

Public Opinion

Author: Walter Lippmann

Publisher: Harcourt

ISBN: N.A

Category: Public opinion

Page: 427

View: 9070

Strangers No More

Immigration and the Challenges of Integration in North America and Western Europe

Author: Richard Alba,Nancy Foner

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400865905

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 3073

Strangers No More is the first book to compare immigrant integration across key Western countries. Focusing on low-status newcomers and their children, it examines how they are making their way in four critical European countries—France, Germany, Great Britain, and the Netherlands—and, across the Atlantic, in the United States and Canada. This systematic, data-rich comparison reveals their progress and the barriers they face in an array of institutions—from labor markets and neighborhoods to educational and political systems—and considers the controversial questions of religion, race, identity, and intermarriage. Richard Alba and Nancy Foner shed new light on questions at the heart of concerns about immigration. They analyze why immigrant religion is a more significant divide in Western Europe than in the United States, where race is a more severe obstacle. They look at why, despite fears in Europe about the rise of immigrant ghettoes, residential segregation is much less of a problem for immigrant minorities there than in the United States. They explore why everywhere, growing economic inequality and the proliferation of precarious, low-wage jobs pose dilemmas for the second generation. They also evaluate perspectives often proposed to explain the success of immigrant integration in certain countries, including nationally specific models, the political economy, and the histories of Canada and the United States as settler societies. Strangers No More delves into issues of pivotal importance for the present and future of Western societies, where immigrants and their children form ever-larger shares of the population.

Christians at the Border

Immigration, the Church, and the Bible

Author: M. Daniel Carroll R.

Publisher: Brazos Press

ISBN: 1441245650

Category: Religion

Page: 200

View: 8087

Immigration is one of the most pressing issues on the national agenda. In this accessible book, an internationally recognized immigration expert helps readers think biblically about this divisive issue, offering accessible, nuanced, and sympathetic guidance for the church. As both a Guatemalan and an American, the author is able to empathize with both sides of the struggle and argues that each side has much to learn. This updated and revised edition reflects changes from the past five years, responds to criticisms of the first edition, and expands sections that have raised questions for readers. It includes a foreword by Samuel Rodríguez and an afterword by Ronald Sider. This timely, clear, and compassionate resource will benefit all Christians who are thinking through the immigration issue.

Unwelcome Strangers

American Identity and the Turn Against Immigration

Author: David M. Reimers

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231109574

Category: History

Page: 199

View: 4990

After decades of liberal policies that welcomed ever greater numbers of immigrants, America is seeing a surge in anti-immigration sentiment. In Unwelcome Strangers, David M. Reimers enters into the emotionally charged immigration debate, looking at all sides of the argument. Who are the nativists, and are any of their views legitimate? This balanced investigation traces the history of American attitudes toward immigration and offers a new perspective on the current crisis. The core of this book covers the heated arguments of the anti-immigration forces, from environmental groups that warn against the consequences of overpopulation, to concerns that immigrants take jobs away from Americans, to assimilationist fears that newcomers - especially from Latin America and Asia - threaten American culture. Reimers sees potential solutions in English language instruction for newcomers, greater accountability of sponsors, and government intervention to counterbalance the negative economic impact some immigrants have on poor communities.

Unwelcome Strangers

American Identity and the Turn Against Immigration

Author: David M. Reimers

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231109574

Category: History

Page: 199

View: 2049

After decades of liberal policies that welcomed ever greater numbers of immigrants, America is seeing a surge in anti-immigration sentiment. In Unwelcome Strangers, David M. Reimers enters into the emotionally charged immigration debate, looking at all sides of the argument. Who are the nativists, and are any of their views legitimate? This balanced investigation traces the history of American attitudes toward immigration and offers a new perspective on the current crisis. The core of this book covers the heated arguments of the anti-immigration forces, from environmental groups that warn against the consequences of overpopulation, to concerns that immigrants take jobs away from Americans, to assimilationist fears that newcomers - especially from Latin America and Asia - threaten American culture. Reimers sees potential solutions in English language instruction for newcomers, greater accountability of sponsors, and government intervention to counterbalance the negative economic impact some immigrants have on poor communities.