Glass of the Roman World

Author: Justine Bayley,Ian Freestone,Caroline Jackson

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 1782977775

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 5991

Glass of the Roman World illustrates the arrival of new cultural systems, mechanisms of trade and an expanded economic base in the early 1st millennium AD which, in combination, allowed the further development of the existing glass industry. Glass became something which encompassed more than simply a novel and highly decorative material. Glass production grew and its consumption increased until it was assimilated into all levels of society, used for display and luxury items but equally for utilitarian containers, windows and even tools. These 18 papers by renowned international scholars include studies of glass from Europe and the Near East. The authors write on a variety of topics where their work is at the forefront of new approaches to the subject. They both extend and consolidate aspects of our understanding of how glass was produced, traded and used throughout the Empire and the wider world drawing on chronology, typology, patterns of distribution, and other methodologies, including the incorporation of new scientific methods. Though focusing on a single material the papers are firmly based in its archaeological context in the wider economy of the Roman world, and consider glass as part of a complex material culture controlled by the expansion and contraction of the Empire. The volume is presented in honor of Jenny Price, a foremost scholar of Roman glass.

Roman Glass in the Corning Museum of Glass

Author: David Whitehouse

Publisher: Hudson Hills

ISBN: 9780872901391

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 381

View: 2038

The Corning Museum contains one of the best collections of Roman glass in the world. Many of the objects in the collection were published in Pre-Roman and Early Roman Glass in the Corning Museum of Glass in 1979; this volume contains 481 additional artefacts dating from the 1st century BC to the 7th/8th century AD. Each entry in the catalogue comprises a detailed description with comments and a colour photograph, with additional drawings given at the back. The catalogue entries are divided by technique: casting or pressing; casting and blowing; cameo; blowing; blowing and blobbed decoration/cut decoration.

Glass Making in the Greco-Roman World

Results of the ARCHGLASS project

Author: Patrick Degryse

Publisher: Leuven University Press

ISBN: 9462700079

Category: Social Science

Page: 190

View: 4718

New insights into the trade and processing of mineral raw materials for glass making - Free ebook at OAPEN Library (www.oapen.org) This book presents a reconstruction of the Hellenistic-Roman glass industry from the point of view of raw material procurement. Within the ERC funded ARCHGLASS project, the authors of this work developed new geochemical techniques to provenance primary glass making. They investigated both production and consumer sites of glass, and identified suitable mineral resources for glass making through geological prospecting. Because the source of the raw materials used in the manufacturing of natron glass can be determined, new insights in the trade of this material are revealed. While eastern Mediterranean glass factories were active throughout the Hellenistic to early Islamic period, western Mediterranean and possibly Italian and North African sources also supplied the Mediterranean world with raw glass in early Roman times. By combining archaeological and scientific data, the authors develop new interdisciplinary techniques for an innovative archaeological interpretation of glass trade in the Hellenistic-Roman world, highlighting the development of glass as an economic material. Contributors Annelore Blomme (KU Leuven), Sara Boyen (KU Leuven), Dieter Brems (KU Leuven), Florence Cattin (Université de Bourgogne), Mike Carremans (KU Leuven), Veerle Devulder (KU Leuven, UGent), Thomas Fenn (Yale University), Monica Ganio (Northwestern University), Johan Honings (KU Leuven), Rebecca Scott (KU Leuven)

Trade, Commerce, and the State in the Roman World

Author: Alan Bowman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019879066X

Category: Architecture

Page: 688

View: 3093

This volume presents eighteen papers by leading Roman historians and archaeologists discussing trade in the Roman Empire during the period c.100 BC to AD 350. It focuses especially on the role of the Roman state in shaping the institutional framework for trade within and outside the empire, in taxing that trade, and in intervening in the markets to ensure the supply of particular commodities, especially for the city of Rome and for the army. As part of a novel interdisciplinary approach to the subject, the chapters address its myriad facets on the basis of broadly different sources of evidence: historical, papyrological, and archaeological. They are grouped into three sections, covering institutional factors (taxation, legal structures, market regulation, financial institutions); evidence for long-distance trade within the empire in wood, stone, glass, and pottery; and trade beyond the frontiers, with the east (as far as China), India, Arabia, the Red Sea, and the Sahara. Rome's external trade with realms to the east emerges as being of particular significance, but it is in the eastern part of the empire itself where the state appears to have adapted the mechanisms of taxation in collaboration with the elite holders of wealth to support its need for revenue. On the other hand, the price of that collaboration, which was in effect a fiscal partnership, ultimately led in the longer term in slightly different forms in the east and the west to a fundamental change in the political character of the empire.

Early glass of the ancient world

1600 B.C.-A.D. 50 : Ernesto Wolf collection

Author: Birgit Schlick-Nolte

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 430

View: 8464

Of particular value is a systematic analysis - the first to date - of the history of ancient glass technology. Presented in easy-to-understand language and accompanied by numerous comparative photographs and drawings, step-by-step descriptions of studio experiments reconstruct the techniques of the ancient artisans. The descriptive catalogue of this comprehensive collection is illustrated with full-color photographs by Peter Frankenstein and Hendrik Zwietasch who have captured the magic of ancient glass, enabling the reader to behold many small objects as through a magnifying glass. E. Marianne Stern and Birgit Schlick-Nolte meticulously researched and documented Ernesto Wolf's collection to create an essential handbook of early ancient glass.

Things that Travelled

Mediterranean Glass in the First Millennium AD

Author: Daniela Rosenow,Matt Phelps,Andrew Meek,Ian Freestone

Publisher: UCL Press

ISBN: 1787351173

Category: Social Science

Page: 362

View: 9850

Recent research has demonstrated that, in the Roman, Late Antique, Early Islamic and Medieval worlds, glass was traded over long distances, from the Eastern Mediterranean, mainly Egypt and Israel, to Northern Africa, the Western Mediterranean and Northern Europe. Things that Travelled, a collaboration between the UCL Early Glass Technology Research Network, the Association for the History of Glass and the British Museum, aims to build on this knowledge. Covering all aspects of glass production, technology, distribution and trade in Roman, Byzantine and Early Medieval/Early Islamic times, including studies from Britain, Egypt, Cyprus, Italy and many others, the volume combines the strengths of the sciences and cultural studies to offer a new approach to research on ancient glass. By bringing together such a varied mix of contributors, specialising in a range of geographical areas and chronological time frames, this volume also offers a valuable contribution to broader discussions on glass within political, economic, cultural and historical arenas.

Roman Glass

Reflections on Cultural Change

Author: Stuart James Fleming

Publisher: UPenn Museum of Archaeology

ISBN: 9780924171727

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 9152

Follow the way social attitudes and historical events--among them, slavery and materialism, wars and plagues--influenced how glassworking developed in the Roman world from the mid-first century B.C. to the late sixth century A.D. Woven into this story is the place of glassware in Roman everyday life, from the lady-of-the-house's cosmetic preparations each morning to the setting of table for the evening meal. Included are two special appendices: one considers the technology of ancient glassmaking, the other summarizes ancient opinions on the properties and merits of glass.

Ennion: Master of Roman Glass

Author: Christopher S. Lightfoot,Zrinka Buljević,Yael Israeli ,Karol B. Wight,Lisa Pilosi ,Mark T. Wypyski

Publisher: Metropolitan Museum of Art

ISBN: 0300208774

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 160

View: 5446

Among glass craftsman active in the 1st century A.D., the most famous and gifted was Ennion, who hailed from the coastal city of Sidon in modern Lebanon. Ennion’s glass stood out for its quality and popularity. His products are distinguished by the fine detail and precision of their relief decoration, which imitates designs found on contemporaneous silverware. This compact, but thorough volume examines the most innovative and elegant known examples of Roman mold-blown glass, providing a uniquely comprehensive, up-to-date study of these exceptional works. Included are some twenty-six remarkably preserved examples of drinking cups, bowls, and jugs signed by Ennion himself, as well as fifteen additional vessels that were clearly influenced by him. The informative texts and illustrations effectively convey the lasting aesthetic appeal of Ennion’s vessels, and offer an accessible introduction to an ancient art form that reached its apogee in the early decades of the Roman Empire.

Glass of the Roman Empire

Author: Sheppard & Cooper Ltd,Christopher Sheppard

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Glassware, Roman

Page: 39

View: 3548

How Glass Changed the World

The History and Chemistry of Glass from Antiquity to the 13th Century

Author: Seth C. Rasmussen

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 3642281834

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 85

View: 5247

Glass production is thought to date to ~2500 BC and had found numerous uses by the height of the Roman Empire. Yet the modern view of glass-based chemical apparatus (beakers, flasks, stills, etc.) was quite limited due to a lack of glass durability under rapid temperature changes and chemical attack. This “brief” gives an overview of the history and chemistry of glass technology from its origins in antiquity to its dramatic expansion in the 13th century, concluding with its impact on society in general, particularly its effect on chemical practices.

Writing and Power in the Roman World

Author: Hella Eckardt

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108418058

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 7407

This book focuses on the material practice of ancient literacy through a contextual examination of Roman writing equipment.

The Hellenistic, Roman, and Medieval Glass from Cosa

Author: David F Grose

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 0472130625

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 1906

A landmark contribution to our knowledge of the Roman glass industry in the Western Mediterranean

The Roman Market Economy

Author: Peter Temin

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 069114768X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 299

View: 8493

"The study of ancient economies has for many generations been a fiercely debated field. Peter Temin has produced a book that will in many ways foster renewed energy in this great debate. What is of special value here is his economic analysis, including the use of regressions to show that price movements in the Roman provinces must be linked to those in Rome itself, and that the Roman economy, therefore, was a market economy. Whether one agrees or not with this basic conclusion, the framing of the evidence will alter the terms of the debate, and not just for the Roman economy but for Hellenistic economies as well. The book is a must-read for all economic historians and will surely become one of the most widely read books on the ancient economy."--J. G. Manning, Yale University "Peter Temin's fascinating book deploys the techniques of economic analysis to understand the nature of Roman trade, markets, and transactions, and definitively challenges the view of the Roman Empire as a 'primitive' economy. Stressing the importance of markets, trade, commerce, and banking, and emphasizing their prominence in the evidence from ancient texts and archaeology, Temin offers a sophisticated account of Rome's economic institutions and practices that fundamentally revises and enriches our understanding of the prosperity and the decline of this major imperial power."--Alan K. Bowman, University of Oxford "This is a very important book, and I know of no other quite like it. Temin's scholarship promotes and illustrates the relevance of economic theory to the study of Roman history. "The Roman Market Economy" contains plenty of claims that are controversial, but that's what will energize the debate."--Walter Scheidel, coeditor of "The Oxford Handbook of Roman Studies" "Economic historians have actively studied medieval and early modern Europe for decades, but few have ventured back as far as Peter Temin does here. He demonstrates that economic arguments apply just as well to the ancient world, and that even quite general propositions can be tested against evidence from antiquity."--Francois R. Velde, coauthor of "The Big Problem of Small Change" "

Roman Glass

Reflections of Everyday Life

Author: Stuart J. Fleming

Publisher: UPenn Museum of Archaeology

ISBN: 9780924171512

Category: History

Page: 66

View: 1474

This lavishly illustrated book places glass in its social setting within the Roman household. The volume was written to accompany the traveling exhibition Roman Glass: Reflections on Cultural Change. Through a series of vignettes, the author tells the story of the development of the glass industry in the Roman Empire and the role of glass in the daily routines of the ancient Romans. During the reign of Rome's first emperor, Augustus (27 B.C.-A.D. 14), as several well-established industries such as pottery- and textile-making were being expanded, the craft of glassmaking was adopted from the East, turned into an industry, and adapted to Roman taste. By the mid-first century A.D. glass rivaled pottery in the domestic marketplace. It was used for tableware and storage containers to hold everything from preserved fish to fine perfumes. Glass featured strongly in the Roman daily routine, from the early morning, when maids would apply perfumed lotions to their mistress in preparation for her social rounds, to the late afternoon, when slaves would bring platters of food, bowls of fruit, and jugs of wine—all of glass—to the supper table. And there was a place for glass even in Roman funerary ritual, because it was custom to include all manner of domestic items among the grave furnishings, to add comfort to the afterlife.

The Ruin of the Roman Empire

A New History

Author: James J. O'Donnell

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0060787376

Category: History

Page: 436

View: 4765

Recounts the sixth-century events and circumstances that led to the fall of the Roman Empire.

Glass

A Short History

Author: David Whitehouse

Publisher: Smithsonian Inst Press

ISBN: 1588343243

Category: ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

Page: 128

View: 2209

"A concise history of glassmaking around the world, from Mesopotamia to the present day"--

Mosaics of the Greek and Roman World

Author: Katherine M. D. Dunbabin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521002301

Category: Art

Page: 357

View: 5231

This book provides a comprehensive account of mosaics in the ancient world from the early pebble mosaics of Greece to the pavements of Christian churches in the East. Separate chapters in Part I cover the principal regions of the Roman Empire in turn, in order to bring out the distinctive characteristics of their mosaic workshops. Questions of technique and production, of the role of mosaics in architecture, and of their social functions and implications are treated in Part II. The book discusses both well-known works and recent finds, and balances consideration of exceptional masterpieces against standard workshop production. Two main lines of approach are followed throughout: first, the role of mosaics as a significant art form, which over an unbroken span illuminates the evolution of pictorial style better than any comparable surviving medium; and secondly, their character as works of artisan production closely linked to their architectural context.

Early ancient glass

core-formed, rod-formed, and cast vessels and objects from the late Bronze Age to the early Roman Empire, 1600 B.C. to A.D. 50

Author: David F. Grose

Publisher: Hudson Hills Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 453

View: 2130

Definitive history reproduces 713 vessels and objects. Nearly 1,000 illustrations, 130 color.

Trade, Commerce, and the State in the Roman World

Author: Alan Bowman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019879066X

Category: Architecture

Page: 688

View: 1347

This volume presents eighteen papers by leading Roman historians and archaeologists discussing trade in the Roman Empire during the period c.100 BC to AD 350. It focuses especially on the role of the Roman state in shaping the institutional framework for trade within and outside the empire, in taxing that trade, and in intervening in the markets to ensure the supply of particular commodities, especially for the city of Rome and for the army. As part of a novel interdisciplinary approach to the subject, the chapters address its myriad facets on the basis of broadly different sources of evidence: historical, papyrological, and archaeological. They are grouped into three sections, covering institutional factors (taxation, legal structures, market regulation, financial institutions); evidence for long-distance trade within the empire in wood, stone, glass, and pottery; and trade beyond the frontiers, with the east (as far as China), India, Arabia, the Red Sea, and the Sahara. Rome's external trade with realms to the east emerges as being of particular significance, but it is in the eastern part of the empire itself where the state appears to have adapted the mechanisms of taxation in collaboration with the elite holders of wealth to support its need for revenue. On the other hand, the price of that collaboration, which was in effect a fiscal partnership, ultimately led in the longer term in slightly different forms in the east and the west to a fundamental change in the political character of the empire.

SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome

Author: Mary Beard

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 1631491253

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 4017

A sweeping, revisionist history of the Roman Empire from one of our foremost classicists. Ancient Rome was an imposing city even by modern standards, a sprawling imperial metropolis of more than a million inhabitants, a "mixture of luxury and filth, liberty and exploitation, civic pride and murderous civil war" that served as the seat of power for an empire that spanned from Spain to Syria. Yet how did all this emerge from what was once an insignificant village in central Italy? In S.P.Q.R., world-renowned classicist Mary Beard narrates the unprecedented rise of a civilization that even two thousand years later still shapes many of our most fundamental assumptions about power, citizenship, responsibility, political violence, empire, luxury, and beauty. From the foundational myth of Romulus and Remus to 212 ce—nearly a thousand years later—when the emperor Caracalla gave Roman citizenship to every free inhabitant of the empire, S.P.Q.R. (the abbreviation of "The Senate and People of Rome") examines not just how we think of ancient Rome but challenges the comfortable historical perspectives that have existed for centuries by exploring how the Romans thought of themselves: how they challenged the idea of imperial rule, how they responded to terrorism and revolution, and how they invented a new idea of citizenship and nation. Opening the book in 63 bce with the famous clash between the populist aristocrat Catiline and Cicero, the renowned politician and orator, Beard animates this “terrorist conspiracy,” which was aimed at the very heart of the Republic, demonstrating how this singular event would presage the struggle between democracy and autocracy that would come to define much of Rome’s subsequent history. Illustrating how a classical democracy yielded to a self-confident and self-critical empire, S.P.Q.R. reintroduces us, though in a wholly different way, to famous and familiar characters—Hannibal, Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Augustus, and Nero, among others—while expanding the historical aperture to include those overlooked in traditional histories: the women, the slaves and ex-slaves, conspirators, and those on the losing side of Rome’s glorious conquests. Like the best detectives, Beard sifts fact from fiction, myth and propaganda from historical record, refusing either simple admiration or blanket condemnation. Far from being frozen in marble, Roman history, she shows, is constantly being revised and rewritten as our knowledge expands. Indeed, our perceptions of ancient Rome have changed dramatically over the last fifty years, and S.P.Q.R., with its nuanced attention to class inequality, democratic struggles, and the lives of entire groups of people omitted from the historical narrative for centuries, promises to shape our view of Roman history for decades to come.