Harpers's Weekly 1864 Part 2

Civil War (1861-1865) Illustrations – Series 1864 Part 2 Featuring Warrenton, Fauquier County, Virginia and Beyond

Author: Walt H. Sirene

Publisher: Walt H. Sirene

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 125

View: 9864

This is a selective collection of Harper’s Weekly woodcut Civil War images appearing during Mid 1864, along with the original descriptions of illustrations. The focus is Warrenton town and Fauquier County Virginia, and beyond. About This Document -- Several years ago, Fauquier resident Paul Mellon kindly gifted a collection of Harper’s Weekly news magazines to the Fauquier Historical Society. They are a great educational source of engraved images highlighting Civil War events published when most newspapers were only words. The images illuminate the story. Harper’s artists were busy making on-scene images for woodcut engravings including many of Warrenton, Fauquier County and nearby environs in Northern Virginia. Warrenton, the county seat, was of military importance as a commercial crossroads including a railroad branch line terminus. It changed occupiers sixty-seven times during the War. It was the hub for Confederate Col. John S Mosby’s partisan raiders who were citizens by day and raiders at night. With daring raids they strategically kept the Union’s Army of the Potomac bottled up in Northern Virginia protecting /repairing supply lines and Washington DC. Fauquier was also home to many enslaved, about 48% of the population at the beginning of the War. The images are in high resolution and were digitally enhanced to give readers, students and researchers clarity.

Custer

The Life of General George Armstrong Custer

Author: Jay Monaghan

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803257320

Category: History

Page: 469

View: 8383

"The Custer literature is voluminous and most of it is highly controversial. Through the tangle of charges and countercharges Jay Monaghan cuts a clear path in his fresh account of Custer's whole career. Where possible, Monaghan relies on original sources, and he appraises them with the sound judgment of the practiced historian he is. He is sympathetic with Custer but does not hesitate to show the man's foibles and failures. He presents no attorney's brief and yet he disproves a number of ill-founded accusations. . . ."

Harper’s Weekly 1865 Part 2 - Andersonville

Civil War (1861-1865) Illustrations – Series 1865 Part 2 Andersonville Atrocities, Jailor’s Trial

Author: Walt H. Sirene

Publisher: Walt H. Sirene

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 99

View: 9283

This is a selective collection of Harper’s Weekly woodcut images from throughout 1865 regarding cruelties at Andersonville. The original descriptions of illustrations of the jailor’s trial and rebel treatment of Union prisoners is presented. About This Document -- Several years ago, Fauquier resident Paul Mellon kindly gifted a collection of Harper’s Weekly news magazines to the Fauquier Historical Society. They are a great educational source of engraved images highlighting Civil War events published when most newspapers were only words. The images illuminate the story.

Harper's Weekly

Author: John Bonner,George William Curtis,Henry Mills Alden,Samuel Stillman Conant,Montgomery Schuyler,John Foord,Richard Harding Davis,Carl Schurz,Henry Loomis Nelson,John Kendrick Bangs,George Brinton McClellan Harvey,Norman Hapgood

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: N.A

View: 2788

Journal of the Civil War Era

Fall 2012 Issue

Author: William A. Blair

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807852651

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 3596

The Journal of the Civil War Era Volume 2, Number 3 September 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS Articles Robert Fortenbaugh Memorial Lecture Joan Waugh "I Only Knew What Was in My Mind": Ulysses S. Grant and the Meaning of Appomattox Patrick Kelly The North American Crisis of the 1860s Carole Emberton "Only Murder Makes Men": Reconsidering the Black Military Experience Caroline E. Janney "I Yield to No Man an Iota of My Convictions": Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park and the Limits of Reconciliation Book Reviews Books Received Review Essay David S. Reynolds Reading the Sesquicentennial: New Directions in the Popular History of the Civil War Notes on Contributors The Journal of the Civil War Era takes advantage of the flowering of research on the many issues raised by the sectional crisis, war, Reconstruction, and memory of the conflict, while bringing fresh understanding to the struggles that defined the period, and by extension, the course of American history in the nineteenth century.

The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

Author: Philip Alexander Bruce,William Glover Stanard

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Virginia

Page: N.A

View: 916

Vols. 1-28, 30-31, 33-34 include the society's Proceedings... at its annual meeting... 1893-1923, 1926.

The Publishers Weekly

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: American literature

Page: N.A

View: 1614

Andrew Johnson and Reconstruction

Author: Eric L. McKitrick

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195057074

Category: Computers

Page: 533

View: 4056

An essential work on the Civil War period, this classic of Reconstruction scholarship challenges the longstanding myth of Andrew Johnson as misunderstood statesman, revealing him as a small-minded, vindictive, and stubborn man, whose rigid determination to defy Northern majority opinion thwarted the post-war reunion of North and South.

The Harp and the Eagle

Irish-American Volunteers and the Union Army, 1861-1865

Author: Susannah Ural Bruce,Susannah J. Ural

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814799390

Category: History

Page: 309

View: 2284

On the eve of the Civil War, the Irish were one of America's largest ethnic groups, and approximately 150,000 fought for the Union. Analyzing letters and diaries written by soldiers and civilians; military, church, and diplomatic records; and community newspapers, Susannah Ural Bruce significantly expands the story of Irish-American Catholics in the Civil War, and reveals a complex picture of those who fought for the Union. While the population was diverse, many Irish Americans had dual loyalties to the U.S. and Ireland, which influenced their decisions to volunteer, fight, or end their military service. When the Union cause supported their interests in Ireland and America, large numbers of Irish Americans enlisted. However, as the war progressed, the Emancipation Proclamation, federal draft, and sharp rise in casualties caused Irish Americans to question—and sometimes abandon—the war effort because they viewed such changes as detrimental to their families and futures in America and Ireland. By recognizing these competing and often fluid loyalties, The Harp and the Eagle sheds new light on the relationship between Irish-American volunteers and the Union Army, and how the Irish made sense of both the Civil War and their loyalty to the United States.

Lincolnites and Rebels

A Divided Town in the American Civil War

Author: Robert Tracy McKenzie

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199884714

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 4070

At the start of the Civil War, Knoxville, Tennessee, with a population of just over 4,000, was considered a prosperous metropolis little reliant on slavery. Although the surrounding countryside was predominantly Unionist in sympathy, Knoxville itself was split down the middle, with Union and Confederate supporters even holding simultaneous political rallies at opposite ends of the town's main street. Following Tennessee's secession, Knoxville soon became famous (or infamous) as a stronghold of stalwart Unionism, thanks to the efforts of a small cadre who persisted in openly denouncing the Confederacy. Throughout the course of the Civil War, Knoxville endured military occupation for all but three days, hosting Confederate troops during the first half of the conflict and Union forces throughout the remainder, with the transition punctuated by an extended siege and bloody battle during which nearly forty thousand soldiers fought over the town. In Lincolnites and Rebels, Robert Tracy McKenzie tells the story of Civil War Knoxville-a perpetually occupied, bitterly divided Southern town where neighbor fought against neighbor. Mining a treasure-trove of manuscript collections and civil and military records, McKenzie reveals the complex ways in which allegiance altered the daily routine of a town gripped in a civil war within the Civil War and explores the agonizing personal decisions that war made inescapable. Following the course of events leading up to the war, occupation by Confederate and then Union soldiers, and the troubled peace that followed the war, Lincolnites and Rebels details in microcosm the conflict and paints a complex portrait of a border state, neither wholly North nor South.

Sherman's Horsemen

Union Cavalry Operations in the Atlanta Campaign

Author: David Evans

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 645

View: 5603

..". massively researched... those seeking a richly detailed journal of the cavalry's role in one of the war's crucial campaigns will find this book irreplaceable." -- Blue Gray Magazine "This volume is meticulously detailed and comes to some convincing conclusions." -- The Journal of American History "A vivid account of the campaign that helped decide the outcome of the Civil War.... A rich narrative that will delight students of the Civil War." -- Kirkus Reviews Attempting a quick, decisive victory in the 1864 struggle for Atlanta, William Tecumseh Sherman's cavalry wreaked havoc in the countryside around the city. This book, based largely upon previously unpublished materials, tells the story of Sherman's raids. Through exhaustive research, David Evans has been able to recreate a vivid, captivating, and meticulously detailed image of the day-by-day life of the Yankee horse soldier.

In the Presence of Mine Enemies: The Civil War in the Heart of America, 1859-1864

Author: Edward L. Ayers

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393247430

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 6193

Winner of the Bancroft Prize: Through a gripping narrative based on massive new research, a leading historian reshapes our understanding of the Civil War. Our standard Civil War histories tell a reassuring story of the triumph, in an inevitable conflict, of the dynamic, free-labor North over the traditional, slave-based South, vindicating the freedom principles built into the nation's foundations. But at the time, on the borderlands of Pennsylvania and Virginia, no one expected war, and no one knew how it would turn out. The one certainty was that any war between the states would be fought in their fields and streets. Edward L. Ayers gives us a different Civil War, built on an intimate scale. He charts the descent into war in the Great Valley spanning Pennsylvania and Virginia. Connected by strong ties of every kind, including the tendrils of slavery, the people of this borderland sought alternatives to secession and war. When none remained, they took up war with startling intensity. As this book relays with a vivid immediacy, it came to their doorsteps in hunger, disease, and measureless death. Ayers's Civil War emerges from the lives of everyday people as well as those who helped shape history—John Brown and Frederick Douglass, Lincoln, Jackson, and Lee. His story ends with the valley ravaged, Lincoln's support fragmenting, and Confederate forces massing for a battle at Gettysburg.

Battle Hymns

The Power and Popularity of Music in the Civil War

Author: Christian McWhirter

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807882623

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 7070

Music was everywhere during the Civil War. Tunes could be heard ringing out from parlor pianos, thundering at political rallies, and setting the rhythms of military and domestic life. With literacy still limited, music was an important vehicle for communicating ideas about the war, and it had a lasting impact in the decades that followed. Drawing on an array of published and archival sources, Christian McWhirter analyzes the myriad ways music influenced popular culture in the years surrounding the war and discusses its deep resonance for both whites and blacks, South and North. Though published songs of the time have long been catalogued and appreciated, McWhirter is the first to explore what Americans actually said and did with these pieces. By gauging the popularity of the most prominent songs and examining how Americans used them, McWhirter returns music to its central place in American life during the nation's greatest crisis. The result is a portrait of a war fought to music.

Desperate Engagement

How a Little-Known Civil War Battle Saved Washington, D.C., and Changed American History

Author: Marc Leepson

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 1466851708

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 5751

The Battle of Monocacy, which took place on the blisteringly hot day of July 9, 1864, is one of the Civil War's most significant yet little-known battles. What played out that day in the corn and wheat fields four miles south of Frederick, Maryland., was a full-field engagement between some 12,000 battle-hardened Confederate troops led by the controversial Jubal Anderson Early, and some 5,800 Union troops, many of them untested in battle, under the mercurial Lew Wallace, the future author of Ben-Hur. When the fighting ended, some 1,300 Union troops were dead, wounded or missing or had been taken prisoner, and Early---who suffered some 800 casualties---had routed Wallace in the northernmost Confederate victory of the war. Two days later, on another brutally hot afternoon, Monday, July 11, 1864, the foul-mouthed, hard-drinking Early sat astride his horse outside the gates of Fort Stevens in the upper northwestern fringe of Washington, D.C. He was about to make one of the war's most fateful, portentous decisions: whether or not to order his men to invade the nation's capital. Early had been on the march since June 13, when Robert E. Lee ordered him to take an entire corps of men from their Richmond-area encampment and wreak havoc on Yankee troops in the Shenandoah Valley, then to move north and invade Maryland. If Early found the conditions right, Lee said, he was to take the war for the first time into President Lincoln's front yard. Also on Lee's agenda: forcing the Yankees to release a good number of troops from the stranglehold that Gen. U.S. Grant had built around Richmond. Once manned by tens of thousands of experienced troops, Washington's ring of forts and fortifications that day were in the hands of a ragtag collection of walking wounded Union soldiers, the Veteran Reserve Corps, along with what were known as hundred days' men---raw recruits who had joined the Union Army to serve as temporary, rear-echelon troops. It was with great shock, then, that the city received news of the impending rebel attack. With near panic filling the streets, Union leaders scrambled to coordinate a force of volunteers. But Early did not pull the trigger. Because his men were exhausted from the fight at Monocacy and the ensuing march, Early paused before attacking the feebly manned Fort Stevens, giving Grant just enough time to bring thousands of veteran troops up from Richmond. The men arrived at the eleventh hour, just as Early was contemplating whether or not to move into Washington. No invasion was launched, but Early did engage Union forces outside Fort Stevens. During the fighting, President Lincoln paid a visit to the fort, becoming the only sitting president in American history to come under fire in a military engagement. Historian Marc Leepson shows that had Early arrived in Washington one day earlier, the ensuing havoc easily could have brought about a different conclusion to the war. Leepson uses a vast amount of primary material, including memoirs, official records, newspaper accounts, diary entries and eyewitness reports in a reader-friendly and engaging description of the events surrounding what became known as "the Battle That Saved Washington."

Lincoln and the Russians

Author: Albert Alexander Woldman

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Russia

Page: 288

View: 9069

River Run Red

The Fort Pillow Massacre in the American Civil War

Author: Andrew Ward

Publisher: Viking Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 531

View: 2627

An account of the controversial April 1864 Civil War battle between Confederate cavalry leader Nathan Bedford Forrest and a garrison of Unionists and former slave artillerymen offers insight into how corruption and racism in occupied Tennessee played a role in the Confederate victory and how Forrest went on to found the Ku Klux Klan. By the author of Dark Midnight When I Rise. 30,000 first printing.

Richard S. Ewell

A Soldier's Life

Author: Donald C. Pfanz

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807888524

Category: History

Page: 680

View: 3392

General Richard Stoddert Ewell holds a unique place in the history of the Army of Northern Virginia. For four months Ewell was Stonewall Jackson's most trusted subordinate; when Jackson died, Ewell took command of the Second Corps, leading it at Gettysburg, the Wilderness, and Spotsylvania Court House. In this biography, Donald Pfanz presents the most detailed portrait yet of the man sometimes referred to as Stonewall Jackson's right arm. Drawing on a rich array of previously untapped original source materials, Pfanz concludes that Ewell was a highly competent general, whose successes on the battlefield far outweighed his failures. But Pfanz's book is more than a military biography. It also examines Ewell's life before and after the Civil War, including his years at West Point, his service in the Mexican War, his experiences as a dragoon officer in Arizona and New Mexico, and his postwar career as a planter in Mississippi and Tennessee. In all, Pfanz offers an exceptionally detailed portrait of one of the South's most important leaders.

New Serial Titles

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Periodicals

Page: N.A

View: 7721