Holding Aloft the Banner of Ethiopia

Caribbean Radicalism in Early Twentieth-century America

Author: Winston James

Publisher: Verso

ISBN: 9781859849996

Category: History

Page: 406

View: 2265

A major history of the impact of Caribbean migration to the United States. Marcus Garvey, Claude McKay, Claudia Jones, C.L.R. James, Stokely Carmichael, Louis Farakhan -- the roster of immigrants from the Caribbean who have made a profound impact on the development of radical politics in the United States is extensive. In this magisterial and lavishly illustrated work, Winston James focuses on the twentieth century's first waves of immigrants from the Caribbean and their contribution to political dissidence in America. Examining the way in which the characteristics of the societies they left shaped their perceptions of the land to which they traveled, Winston James draws sharp differences between Hispanic and English-speaking arrivals. He explores the interconnections between the Cuban independence struggle, Puerto Rican nationalism, Afro-American feminism, and black communism in the first turbulent decades of the twentieth century. He also provides fascinating insights into the impact of Puerto Rican radicalism in New York City and recounts the remarkable story of Afro-Cuban radicalism in Florida.

Black Intellectual Thought in Modern America

A Historical Perspective

Author: Brian D. Behnken,Gregory D. Smithers,Simon Wendt

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1496813669

Category: Social Science

Page: 252

View: 8278

Contributions by Tunde Adeleke, Brian D. Behnken, Minkah Makalani, Benita Roth, Gregory D. Smithers, Simon Wendt, and Danielle L. Wiggins Black intellectualism has been misunderstood by the American public and by scholars for generations. Historically maligned by their peers and by the lay public as inauthentic or illegitimate, black intellectuals have found their work misused, ignored, or discarded. Black intellectuals have also been reductively placed into one or two main categories: they are usually deemed liberal or, less frequently, as conservative. The contributors to this volume explore several prominent intellectuals, from left-leaning leaders such as W. E. B. Du Bois to conservative intellectuals like Thomas Sowell, from well-known black feminists such as Patricia Hill Collins to Marxists like Claudia Jones, to underscore the variety of black intellectual thought in the United States. Contributors also situate the development of the lines of black intellectual thought within the broader history from which these trends emerged. The result gathers essays that offer entry into a host of rich intellectual traditions.

Globalization and Resistance

Transnational Dimensions of Social Movements

Author: Jackie G. Smith,Jackie Smith,Hank Johnston

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742519909

Category: Political Science

Page: 257

View: 5116

Globalization and Resistance brings together cutting edge theory and research about how global economics and politics alter the way ordinary people engage in contentious political action. The cases range from nineteenth-century Irish immigrant networks, to protests against World Bank projects in the Amazon, to contemporary transnational organizing for the environment, to the 'battle of Seattle.' The volume illuminates the different ways that globalization processes affect social movements, and vice versa.

Other Immigrants

The Global Origins of the American People

Author: David Reimers

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814775349

Category: History

Page: 389

View: 8017

Publisher description: In Other immigrants, David M. Reimers offers the first comprehensive account of non-European immigration, chronicling the compelling and diverse stories of frequently overlooked Americans. Reimers traces the early history of Black, Hispanic, and Asian immigrants from the fifteenth century through World War II, when racial hostility led to the virtual exclusion of Asians and aggression towards Blacks and Hispanics. He also describes the modern state of immigration to the U.S., where Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians made up nearly thirty percent of the population at the turn of the twenty-first century.

In the balance of power

independent Black politics and third-party movements in the United States

Author: Omar Hamid Ali,Eric Foner

Publisher: Ohio Univ Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 244

View: 9367

Examines the history of the African-American voting block, its changes to party loyalty over the years, and its long-standing relationship with independent parties to achieve a voice on the political stage. Simultaneous.

America, History and Life

Author: Eric H. Boehm

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: N.A

View: 2337

Provides historical coverage of the United States and Canada from prehistory to the present. Includes information abstracted from over 2,000 journals published worldwide.

The debate on black civil rights in America

Author: Kevern Verney

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719067600

Category: History

Page: 196

View: 8371

Here is the first full-length study to examine the changing academic debate on developments in African American history from the 1890s to the present. It provides a critical historiographical review of the most current thinking and explains how and why research and discourse have evolved in the ways that they have. Individual chapters focus on particular periods in African American history from the spread of racial segregation in the 1890s through to the postwar Civil Rights Movement and the Black Power Movement of the sixties and seventies.

Work Makes a Woman?

Gender, Ethnicity and Work in Afro-Caribbean Immigrant Women's Lives

Author: Natalie D. A. Bennett

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Caribbean Americans

Page: 445

View: 421

Children of Fire

A History of African Americans

Author: Thomas C. Holt

Publisher: Hill and Wang

ISBN: 9780809067138

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 7234

Ordinary people don’t experience history as it is taught by historians. They live across the convenient chronological divides we impose on the past. The same people who lived through the Civil War and the eradication of slavery also dealt with the hardships of Reconstruction, so why do we almost always treat them separately? In Children of Fire, renowned historian Thomas C. Holt challenges this form to tell the story of generations of African Americans through the lived experience of the subjects themselves, with all of the nuances, ironies, contradictions, and complexities one might expect. Building on seminal books like John Hope Franklin’s From Slavery to Freedom and many others, Holt captures the entire African American experience from the moment the first twenty African slaves were sold at Jamestown in 1619. Each chapter focuses on a generation of individuals who shaped the course of American history, hoping for a better life for their children but often confronting the ebb and flow of their civil rights and status within society. Many familiar faces grace these pages—Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King, and Barack Obama—but also some overlooked ones. Figures like Anthony Johnson, a slave who bought his freedom in late seventeenth century Virginia and built a sizable plantation, only to have it stolen away from his children by an increasingly racist court system. Or Frank Moore, a WWI veteran and sharecropper who sued his landlord for unfair practices, but found himself charged with murder after fighting off an angry white posse. Taken together, their stories tell how African Americans fashioned a culture and identity amid the turmoil of four centuries of American history.

Nation and Society

Readings in Post-confederation Canadian History

Author: Margaret Conrad,Alvin Finkel

Publisher: Prentice Hall

ISBN: 9780201743791

Category: Canada

Page: 532

View: 3310

Designed to accompany the two-volume History of the Canadian Peoples and the one-volume synthesis, Canada: A National History. This book can also supplement any survey of Canadian history text or serve as a stand-alone text. Nation and Society: Readings in Post-Confederation Canadian History offers students a sample of some of the best recent scholarship on the history of Canada since Confederation. The readings are grouped in a combination of time periods and themes that are commonly used in studies of the post-Confederation period: Inventing Canada, 1867-1914; Economy and Society in the Industrial Age, 1867-1918; Transitional Years: Canada 1919-1945; Reinventing Canada, 1945-1975; and Post-Modern Canada.

Beyond Fragmentation

Perspectives on Caribbean History

Author: Juanita De Barros,Audra Diptee,David Vincent Trotman

Publisher: Markus Wiener Pub

ISBN: 9781558763579

Category: History

Page: 299

View: 8914

This is the first reader that goes beyond the fragmentation between Spanish, British, Dutch, and French Caribbean history to explain slavery, emancipation, colonization and decolonization in the region. The contributors to this pan-Caribbean approach are leading scholars in the field, including Franklin Knight and Luis Martinez-Fernandez.David Trotman, York University, is the author of Crime in Trinidad and other titles. Juanita de Barros, Western Michigan University, is the author of Order and Place in a Colonial Society.

Instant Notes in Analytical Chemistry

Author: David Kealey,P J Haines

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1135323410

Category: Science

Page: 352

View: 891

Instant Notes in Analytical Chemistry provides students with a thorough comprehension of analytical chemistry and its applications. It supports the learning of principles and practice of analytical procedures and also covers the analytical techniques commonly used in laboratories today.

Subject Guide to Books in Print

An Index to the Publishers' Trade List Annual

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: American literature

Page: N.A

View: 7662

Another Kind of Freedom

The Soviet Experiment with Antiracism and Its Image as a Raceless Society, 1928-1936

Author: Meredith Lynn Roman

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: African Americans

Page: 598

View: 4899

A Fierce Hatred of Injustice

Claude McKay's Jamaica and His Poetry of Rebellion

Author: Winston James,Claude McKay

Publisher: Verso

ISBN: 9781859847404

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 265

View: 9725

Analyzes the themes and politics of the early Jamaican works of poet Claude McKay, known for his works on the African Diaspora; explores his use of Jamaican creole; and collects early poems and a comic sketch about Jamaican peasant life.

The Struggles of John Brown Russwurm

The Life and Writings of a Pan-Africanist Pioneer, 1799-1851

Author: Winston James

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814743140

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 5752

“If I know my own heart, I can truly say, that I have not a selfish wish in placing myself under the patronage of the [American Colonization] Society; usefulness in my day and generation, is what I principally court.” “Sensible then, as all are of the disadvantages under which we at present labour, can any consider it a mark of folly, for us to cast our eyes upon some other portion of the globe where all these inconveniences are removed where the Man of Colour freed from the fetters and prejudice, and degradation, under which he labours in this land, may walk forth in all the majesty of his creation—a new born creature—a Free Man!” —John Brown Russwurm, 1829. John Brown Russwurm (1799-1851) is almost completely missing from the annals of the Pan-African movement, despite the pioneering role he played as an educator, abolitionist, editor, government official, emigrationist and colonizationist. Russwurm’s life is one of “firsts”: first African American graduate of Maine’s Bowdoin College; co-founder of Freedom’s Journal, America’s first newspaper to be owned, operated, and edited by African Americans; and, following his emigration to Africa, first black governor of the Maryland section of Liberia. Despite his accomplishments, Russwurm struggled internally with the perennial Pan-Africanist dilemma of whether to go to Africa or stay and fight in the United States, and his ordeal was the first of its kind to be experienced and resolved before the public eye. With this slim, accessible biography of Russwurm, Winston James makes a major contribution to the history of black uplift and protest in the Early American Republic and the larger Pan-African world. James supplements the biography with a carefully edited and annotated selection of Russwurm’s writings, which vividly demonstrate the trajectory of his political thinking and contribution to Pan-Africanist thought and highlight the challenges confronting the peoples of the African Diaspora. Though enormously rich and powerfully analytical, Russwurm’s writings have never been previously anthologized. The Struggles of John Brown Russwurm is a unique and unparalleled reflection on the Early American Republic, the African Diaspora and the wider history of the times. An unblinking observer of and commentator on the condition of African Americans as well as a courageous fighter against white supremacy and for black emancipation, Russwurm’s life and writings provide a distinct and articulate voice on race that is as relevant to the present as it was to his own lifetime.

An Aqueous Territory

Sailor Geographies and New Granada's Transimperial Greater Caribbean World

Author: Ernesto Bassi

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822373734

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 1086

In An Aqueous Territory Ernesto Bassi traces the configuration of a geographic space he calls the transimperial Greater Caribbean between 1760 and 1860. Focusing on the Caribbean coast of New Granada (present-day Colombia), Bassi shows that the region's residents did not live their lives bounded by geopolitical borders. Rather, the cross-border activities of sailors, traders, revolutionaries, indigenous peoples, and others reflected their perceptions of the Caribbean as a transimperial space where trade, information, and people circulated, both conforming to and in defiance of imperial regulations. Bassi demonstrates that the islands, continental coasts, and open waters of the transimperial Greater Caribbean constituted a space that was simultaneously Spanish, British, French, Dutch, Danish, Anglo-American, African, and indigenous. Exploring the "lived geographies" of the region's dwellers, Bassi challenges preconceived notions of the existence of discrete imperial spheres and the inevitable emergence of independent nation-states while providing insights into how people envision their own futures and make sense of their place in the world.

Forthcoming Books

Author: Rose Arny

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: American literature

Page: N.A

View: 3169

Apartheid's Reluctant Uncle

The United States and Southern Africa in the Early Cold War

Author: Thomas Borstelmann

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195079426

Category: History

Page: 298

View: 8751

Despite the unsavory racism of Malan's government - Borstelmann shows that Pretoria fomented violence among black groups in the late 1940s, just as it has done recently between the ANC and Inkatha - the U.S. saw South Africa as a dependable and important ally. In addition, America was almost completely dependent on southern Africa for its uranium supply, and was willing to go to great lengths to secure the critical fuel for its nuclear arsenal. Borstelmann also notes that race relations in the segregated U.S. played a role in Washington's policies, with few white Americans greatly disturbed by the establishment of apartheid. As South Africa finally nears an end to almost fifty years of formal apartheid (and as Truman nears canonization, following the recent presidential election), Borstelmann's account comes as a startling reminder of America's early links to Pretoria's racist system

Tropic Death

Author: Eric Walrond

Publisher: Liveright

ISBN: 9780871403353

Category: Fiction

Page: 192

View: 9335

Finally available after three decades, a lost classic of the Harlem Renaissance that Langston Hughes acclaimed for its “hard poetic beauty.” Eric Walrond (1898–1966), in his only book, injected a profound Caribbean sensibility into black literature. His work was closest to that of Jean Toomer and Zora Neale Hurston with its striking use of dialect and its insights into the daily lives of the people around him. Growing up in British Guiana, Barbados, and Panama, Walrond first published Tropic Death to great acclaim in 1926. This book of stories viscerally charts the days of men working stone quarries or building the Panama Canal, of women tending gardens and rearing needy children. Early on addressing issues of skin color and class, Walrond imbued his stories with a remarkable compassion for lives controlled by the whims of nature. Despite his early celebrity, he died in London in 1966 with minimal recognition given to his passing. Arnold Rampersad’s elegant introduction reclaims this classic work and positions Walrond alongside the prominent writers of his age.