Horror Films of the 1970s

Author: John Kenneth Muir

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786491568

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 684

View: 9796

The seventies were a decade of groundbreaking horror films: The Exorcist, Carrie, and Halloween were three. This detailed filmography covers these and 225 more. Section One provides an introduction and a brief history of the decade. Beginning with 1970 and proceeding chronologically by year of its release in the United States, Section Two offers an entry for each film. Each entry includes several categories of information: Critical Reception (sampling both ’70s and later reviews), Cast and Credits, P.O.V., (quoting a person pertinent to that film’s production), Synopsis (summarizing the film’s story), Commentary (analyzing the film from Muir’s perspective), Legacy (noting the rank of especially worthy ’70s films in the horror pantheon of decades following). Section Three contains a conclusion and these five appendices: horror film clichés of the 1970s, frequently appearing performers, memorable movie ads, recommended films that illustrate how 1970s horror films continue to impact the industry, and the 15 best genre films of the decade as chosen by Muir.

Ten Years of Terror

British Horror Films of the 1970s

Author: Harvey Fenton,David Flint

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Horror films

Page: 336

View: 8571

Documenting the heyday of independent horror film production in Britain, 'Ten Years of Terror' is an encyclopaedic record of this era featuring a stunning selection of film stills and truly great promotional artwork. Films covered include: 'The Wicker Man', 'A Clockwork Orange', 'The Devils', 'Countess Dracula', 'Alien', 'The Omen', 'Killer's Moon', 'The Rocky Horror Picture Show', 'Tales From the Crypt', 'Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell' and more! With 48 full-colour pages. 'Gruesomely beautiful and frighteningly good!' - Hotdog (Book of the Month)

Horror Films of the 1980s

Author: John Kenneth Muir

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786455012

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 843

View: 5075

John Kenneth Muir is back! This time, the author of the acclaimed Horror Films of the 1970s turns his attention to 300 films from the 1980s. From horror franchises like Friday the 13th and Hellraiser to obscurities like The Children and The Boogens, Muir is our informative guide. Muir introduces the scope of the decade’s horrors, and offers a history that draws parallels between current events and the nightmares unfolding on cinema screens. Each of the 300 films is discussed with detailed credits, a brief synopsis, a critical commentary, and where applicable, notes on the film’s legacy beyond the 80s. Also included is the author’s ranking of the 15 best horror films of the 80s.

Shocking Cinema of the Seventies

Author: Xavier Mendik

Publisher: Noir Publishing

ISBN: 9780953656448

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 228

View: 908

The Necronomicon Shocking Cinema of the Seventies continues the acclaimed journal's exploration of film culture with a special edition devoted to film from this special era. In a series of innovative articles, leading critics and scholars consider the social and cinematic issues which shaped the films of the decade. Covering genres such as horror, the disaster movie, blaxploitation, and kung fu, the authors discover the truth behind one of the most prolific, turbulent, and challenging periods of cinema history.

Making and Remaking Horror in the 1970s and 2000s

Why Don’t They Do It Like They Used To?

Author: David Roche

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1617039624

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 335

View: 5022

An expansive treatment of the meanings and qualities of original and remade American horror movies

Horror Films FAQ

All That's Left to Know About Slashers, Vampires, Zombies, Aliens, and More

Author: John Kenneth Muir

Publisher: Hal Leonard Corporation

ISBN: 1480366811

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 386

View: 1116

(FAQ). Horror Films FAQ explores a century of ghoulish and grand horror cinema, gazing at the different characters, situations, settings, and themes featured in the horror film, from final girls, monstrous bogeymen, giant monsters and vampires to the recent torture porn and found footage formats. The book remembers the J-Horror remake trend of the 2000s, and examines the oft-repeated slasher format popularized by John Carpenter's Halloween (1978) and Friday the 13th (1980). After an introduction positioning the horror film as an important and moral voice in the national dialogue, the book explores the history of horror decade by decade, remembering the women's liberation horrors of the 1970s, the rubber reality films of the late 1980s, the serial killers of the 1990s, and the xenophobic terrors of the 9/11 age. Horror Films FAQ also asks what it means when animals attack in such films as The Birds (1963) or Jaws (1975), and considers the moral underpinnings of rape-and-revenge movies, such as I Spit on Your Grave (1978) and Irreversible (2002). The book features numerous photographs from the author's extensive personal archive, and also catalogs the genre's most prominent directors.

Japanese Horror Films and their American Remakes

Author: Valerie Wee

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134109628

Category: Social Science

Page: 258

View: 5998

The Ring (2002)—Hollywood’s remake of the Japanese cult success Ringu (1998)—marked the beginning of a significant trend in the late 1990s and early 2000s of American adaptations of Asian horror films. This book explores this complex process of adaptation, paying particular attention to the various transformations that occur when texts cross cultural boundaries. Through close readings of a range of Japanese horror films and their Hollywood remakes, this study addresses the social, cultural, aesthetic and generic features of each national cinema’s approach to and representation of horror, within the subgenre of the ghost story, tracing convergences and divergences in the films’ narrative trajectories, aesthetic style, thematic focus and ideological content. In comparing contemporary Japanese horror films with their American adaptations, this book advances existing studies of both the Japanese and American cinematic traditions, by: illustrating the ways in which each tradition responds to developments in its social, cultural and ideological milieu; and, examining Japanese horror films and their American remakes through a lens that highlights cross-cultural exchange and bilateral influence. The book will be of interest to scholars of film, media, and cultural studies.

Blaxploitation Films of the 1970s

Blackness and Genre

Author: Novotny Lawrence

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135900361

Category: History

Page: 146

View: 8222

During the early years of the motion picture industry, black performers were often depicted as shuckin’ and jivin’ caricatures. Specifically, black males were portrayed as toms, coons and bucks, while the mammy and tragic mulatto archetypes circumscribed black femininity. This misrepresentation began to change in the 1950s and 1960s when performers such as Dorothy Dandridge and Sidney Poitier were cast in more positive roles. These performers paved the way for the black exploitation or blaxploitation movement, which began in 1970 and flourished until 1975. The movement is characterized by films that feature a black hero or heroine, black supporting characters, a predominately black urban setting, a display of black sexuality, excessive violence, and a contemporary rhythm and blues soundtrack. Blaxploitation films were made across varying genres, but the questionable elements of some of the pictures caused them to be referred to as "blaxploitation" films with little or no regard given to their generic categorization. This book examines how Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970), Blacula (1972), The Mack (1973), and Cleopatra Jones (1973) can be classified within the detective, horror, gangster, and cop action genres, respectively, and illustrates the manner in which the inclusion of "blackness" represents a significant revision to the aforementioned genres.

The Horror Film

Author: Peter Hutchings

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317874099

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 7830

The Horror Film is an in-depth exploration of one of the most consistently popular, but also most disreputable, of all the mainstream film genres. Since the early 1930s there has never been a time when horror films were not being produced in substantial numbers somewhere in the world and never a time when they were not being criticised, censored or banned. The Horror Film engages with the key issues raised by this most contentious of genres. It considers the reasons for horror's disreputability and seeks to explain why despite this horror has been so successful. Where precisely does the appeal of horror lie? An extended introductory chapter identifies what it is about horror that makes the genre so difficult to define. The chapter then maps out the historical development of the horror genre, paying particular attention to the international breadth and variety of horror production, with reference to films made in the United States, Britain, Italy, Spain and elsewhere. Subsequent chapters explore: The role of monsters, focusing on the vampire and the serial killer. The usefulness (and limitations) of psychological approaches to horror. The horror audience: what kind of people like horror (and what do other people think of them)? Gender, race and class in horror: how do horror films such as Bride of Frankenstein, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre and Blade relate to the social and political realities within which they are produced? Sound and horror: in what ways has sound contributed to the development of horror? Performance in horror: how have performers conveyed fear and terror throughout horror's history? 1970s horror: was this the golden age of horror production? Slashers and post-slashers: from Halloween to Scream and beyond. The Horror Film throws new light on some well-known horror films but also introduces the reader to examples of noteworthy but more obscure horror work. A final section provides a guide to further reading and an extensive bibliography. Accessibly written, The Horror Film is a lively and informative account of the genre that will appeal to students of cinema, film teachers and researchers, and horror lovers everywhere.

Selling the Splat Pack

The DVD Revolution and the American Horror Film

Author: Mark Bernard

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748685502

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 264

View: 6457

Were brutal American horror movies like the Saw and Hostel films a reaction to the trauma of 9/11? Or was something else responsible for the rise of these violent and gory films during the first decade of the twenty-first century? This study reveals the history of how the emergence of the DVD market changed cultural and industrial attitudes about horror movies and film ratings. These changes made way for increasingly violent horror films, like those produced by the 'Splat Pack', a group of filmmakers who were heralded in the press as subversive outsiders. Taking a different tack, this study proposes that the films of the Splat Pack were products of, rather than reactions against, film industry policy. In doing so, the monograph blends film industry study with an analysis of the films themselves, revealing the films of the Splat Pack as commercial products rather than political manifestos.

Critical Approaches to the Films of Robert Rodriguez

Author: Frederick Luis Aldama

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292763573

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 264

View: 3749

Frederick Aldama's The Cinema of Robert Rodriguez (2014) was the first full-scale study of one of the most prolific and significant Latino directors making films today. In this companion volume, Aldama enlists a corps of experts to analyze a majority of Rodriguez's feature films, from his first break-out success El Mariachi in 1992 to Machete in 2010. The essays explore the formal and thematic features present in his films from the perspectives of industry (context, convention, and distribution), the film blueprint (auditory and visual ingredients), and consumption (ideal and real audiences). The authors illuminate the manifold ways in which Rodriguez's films operate internally (plot, character, and event) and externally (audience perception, thought, and feeling). The volume is divided into three parts: "Matters of Mind and Media" includes essays that use psychoanalytic and cognitive psychology to shed light on how Rodriguez's films complicate Latino identity, as well as how they succeed in remaking audiences' preconceptions of the world. "Narrative Theory, Cognitive Science, and Sin City: A Case Study" offers tools and models of analysis for the study of Rodriguez's film re-creation of a comic book (on which Frank Miller was credited as codirector). "Aesthetic and Ontological Border Crossings and Borderlands" considers how Rodriguez's films innovatively critique fixed notions of Latino identity and experience, as well as open eyes to racial injustices. As a whole, the volume demonstrates how Rodriguez's career offers critical insights into the filmmaking industry, the creative process, and the consuming and reception of contemporary film.

The Arts in the 1970s

Cultural Closure

Author: Dr Bart Moore-Gilbert,Bart Moore-Gilbert

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113485837X

Category: Social Science

Page: 324

View: 4167

Were the 1970s really `the devils decade'? Images of strikes, galloping inflation, rising unemployment and bitter social divisions evoke a period of unparalleled economic decline, political confrontation and social fragmentation. But how significant were the pessimism and self-doubt of the 1970s, and what was the legacy of its cultural conflicts? Covering the entire spectrum of the arts - drama, television, film, poetry, the novel, popular music, dance, cinema and the visual arts - The Arts in the 1970s challenges received perceptions of the decade as one of cultural decline. The collection breaks new ground in providing the first detailed analysis of the cultural production of the decade as a whole, providing an invaluable resource for all those involved in cultural, media and communications studies.

Cannibalism in Literature and Film

Author: J. Brown

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137292121

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 258

View: 3849

A comprehensive study of cannibalism in literature and film, spanning colonial fiction, Gothic texts and contemporary American horror. Amidst the sharp teeth and horrific appetite of the cannibal, this book examines real fears of over-consumerism and consumption that trouble an ever-growing modern world.

Subversive Horror Cinema

Countercultural Messages of Films from Frankenstein to the Present

Author: Jon Towlson

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 1476615330

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 7070

Horror cinema flourishes in times of ideological crisis and national trauma—the Great Depression, the Cold War, the Vietnam era, post–9/11—and this critical text argues that a succession of filmmakers working in horror—from James Whale to Jen and Sylvia Soska—have used the genre, and the shock value it affords, to challenge the status quo during these times. Spanning the decades from the 1930s onward it examines the work of producers and directors as varied as George A. Romero, Pete Walker, Michael Reeves, Herman Cohen, Wes Craven and Brian Yuzna and the ways in which films like Frankenstein (1931), Cat People (1942), The Woman (2011) and American Mary (2012) can be considered “subversive.”

Spanish Horror Film

Author: Antonio Lazaro-Reboll

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748670629

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 5339

An original new study of Spanish horror film.

The Dread of Difference

Gender and the Horror Film

Author: Barry Keith Grant

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 1477302425

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 560

View: 9415

"The Dread of Difference is a classic. Few film studies texts have been so widely read and so influential. It's rarely on the shelf at my university library, so continuously does it circulate. Now this new edition expands the already comprehensive coverage of gender in the horror film with new essays on recent developments such as the Hostel series and torture porn. Informative and enlightening, this updated classic is an essential reference for fans and students of horror movies."—Stephen Prince, editor of The Horror Film and author of Digital Visual Effects in Cinema: The Seduction of Reality "An impressive array of distinguished scholars . . . gazes deeply into the darkness and then forms a Dionysian chorus reaffirming that sexuality and the monstrous are indeed mated in many horror films."—Choice "An extremely useful introduction to recent thinking about gender issues within this genre."—Film Theory

Empire of Dreams

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Films of Steven Spielberg

Author: Andrew Gordon

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742555785

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 291

View: 6852

Empire of Dreams is the first definitive look at all of the science fiction, fantasy, and horror films directed by Steven Spielberg, one of the most popular and influential contemporary filmmakers. Spielberg helped spark the renaissance of these genres in the 1970s and 1980s and remains productive and prominent in them today. Following most of Spielberg's oeuvre as well as his audiences' reactions, this book shows that his appeal as a storyteller is primarily visceral and emotional—for he has found ways to tap into his own feelings and to evoke profound emotion in audiences.

Nightmare Movies

Horror on Screen Since the 1960s

Author: Kim Newman

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408805030

Category: Fiction

Page: 633

View: 3743

The classic volume of cult film criticism, now brought completely up-to-date 'Encyclopaedic, insightful, and entertaining - no bookshelf should be without Newman's frighteningly readable Nightmare Movies' Mark Kermode

Horror Noire

Blacks in American Horror Films from the 1890s to Present

Author: Robin R Means Coleman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136942947

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 296

View: 2396

From King Kong to Candyman, the boundary-pushing genre of the horror film has always been a site for provocative explorations of race in American popular culture. In Horror Noire: Blacks in American Horror Films from 1890's to Present, Robin R. Means Coleman traces the history of notable characterizations of blackness in horror cinema, and examines key levels of black participation on screen and behind the camera. She argues that horror offers a representational space for black people to challenge the more negative, or racist, images seen in other media outlets, and to portray greater diversity within the concept of blackness itself. Horror Noire presents a unique social history of blacks in America through changing images in horror films. Throughout the text, the reader is encouraged to unpack the genre’s racialized imagery, as well as the narratives that make up popular culture’s commentary on race. Offering a comprehensive chronological survey of the genre, this book addresses a full range of black horror films, including mainstream Hollywood fare, as well as art-house films, Blaxploitation films, direct-to-DVD films, and the emerging U.S./hip-hop culture-inspired Nigerian "Nollywood" Black horror films. Horror Noire is, thus, essential reading for anyone seeking to understand how fears and anxieties about race and race relations are made manifest, and often challenged, on the silver screen.

Hearths of Darkness

The Family in the American Horror Film, Updated Edition

Author: Tony Williams

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1626743517

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 368

View: 2614

Hearths of Darkness: The Family in the American Horror Film traces the origins of the 1970s family horror subgenre to certain aspects of American culture and classical Hollywood cinema. Far from being an ephemeral and short-lived genre, horror actually relates to many facets of American history from its beginnings to the present day. Individual chapters examine aspects of the genre, its roots in the Universal horror films of the 1930s, the Val Lewton RKO unit of the 1940s, and the crucial role of Alfred Hitchcock as the father of the modern American horror film. Subsequent chapters investigate the key works of the 1970s by directors such as Larry Cohen, George A. Romero, Brian De Palma, Wes Craven, and Tobe Hooper, revealing the distinctive nature of films such as Bone, It’s Alive, God Told Me To, Carrie, The Exorcist, Exorcist 2, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, as well as the contributions of such writers as Stephen King. Williams also studies the slasher films of the 1980s and 1990s, such as the Friday the 13th series, Halloween, the remake of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, and Nightmare on Elm Street, exploring their failure to improve on the radical achievements of the films of the 1970s. After covering some post-1970s films, such as The Shining, the book concludes with a new postscript examining neglected films of the twentieth and early twenty-first century. Despite the overall decline in the American horror film, Williams determines that, far from being dead, the family horror film is still with us. Elements of family horror even appear in modern television series such as The Sopranos. This updated edition also includes a new introduction.