Horror Films of the 1970s

Author: John Kenneth Muir

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786491568

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 684

View: 3797

The seventies were a decade of groundbreaking horror films: The Exorcist, Carrie, and Halloween were three. This detailed filmography covers these and 225 more. Section One provides an introduction and a brief history of the decade. Beginning with 1970 and proceeding chronologically by year of its release in the United States, Section Two offers an entry for each film. Each entry includes several categories of information: Critical Reception (sampling both ’70s and later reviews), Cast and Credits, P.O.V., (quoting a person pertinent to that film’s production), Synopsis (summarizing the film’s story), Commentary (analyzing the film from Muir’s perspective), Legacy (noting the rank of especially worthy ’70s films in the horror pantheon of decades following). Section Three contains a conclusion and these five appendices: horror film clichés of the 1970s, frequently appearing performers, memorable movie ads, recommended films that illustrate how 1970s horror films continue to impact the industry, and the 15 best genre films of the decade as chosen by Muir.

Horror Films of the 1980s

Author: John Kenneth Muir

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786455012

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 843

View: 6507

John Kenneth Muir is back! This time, the author of the acclaimed Horror Films of the 1970s turns his attention to 300 films from the 1980s. From horror franchises like Friday the 13th and Hellraiser to obscurities like The Children and The Boogens, Muir is our informative guide. Muir introduces the scope of the decade’s horrors, and offers a history that draws parallels between current events and the nightmares unfolding on cinema screens. Each of the 300 films is discussed with detailed credits, a brief synopsis, a critical commentary, and where applicable, notes on the film’s legacy beyond the 80s. Also included is the author’s ranking of the 15 best horror films of the 80s.

Horror Films of the 1990s

Author: John Kenneth Muir

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786484802

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 715

View: 599

This detailed filmography surveys more than 300 horror films that were released in the years 1990 through 1999. The horror genre's trends, cliches and patterns of the decade are connected to social and cultural phenomena, such as Y2K fears and the Los Angeles Riots. Among the popular forms of this period were films about serial killers, aliens, conspiracies, and sinister "interlopers," new monsters who shambled their way into the lives of everyday people to wreak havoc on screen.

Italian Gothic Horror Films, 1970Ð1979

Author: Roberto Curti

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 1476664692

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 7446

Italian Gothic horror films of the 1970s were influenced by the violent giallo movies and adults-only comics of the era, resulting in a graphic approach to the genre. Stories often featured over-the-top violence and nudity and pushed the limits of what could be shown on the screen. The decade marked the return of specialist directors like Mario Bava, Riccardo Freda and Antonio Margheriti, and the emergence of new talents such as Pupi Avati (The House with the Laughing Windows) and Francesco Barilli (The Perfume of the Lady in Black). The author examines the Italian Gothic horror of the period, providing previously unpublished details and production data taken from official papers, original scripts and interviews with filmmakers, scriptwriters and actors. Entries include complete cast and crew lists, plot summaries, production history and analysis. An appendix covers Italian made-for-TV films and mini-series.

Ten Years of Terror

British Horror Films of the 1970s

Author: Harvey Fenton,David Flint

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Horror films

Page: 336

View: 6877

Documenting the heyday of independent horror film production in Britain, 'Ten Years of Terror' is an encyclopaedic record of this era featuring a stunning selection of film stills and truly great promotional artwork. Films covered include: 'The Wicker Man', 'A Clockwork Orange', 'The Devils', 'Countess Dracula', 'Alien', 'The Omen', 'Killer's Moon', 'The Rocky Horror Picture Show', 'Tales From the Crypt', 'Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell' and more! With 48 full-colour pages. 'Gruesomely beautiful and frighteningly good!' - Hotdog (Book of the Month)

Shocking Cinema of the Seventies

Author: Xavier Mendik

Publisher: Noir Publishing

ISBN: 9780953656448

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 228

View: 1976

The Necronomicon Shocking Cinema of the Seventies continues the acclaimed journal's exploration of film culture with a special edition devoted to film from this special era. In a series of innovative articles, leading critics and scholars consider the social and cinematic issues which shaped the films of the decade. Covering genres such as horror, the disaster movie, blaxploitation, and kung fu, the authors discover the truth behind one of the most prolific, turbulent, and challenging periods of cinema history.

Television Fright Films of the 1970s

Author: David Deal

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786455144

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 230

View: 3684

If the made-for-television movie has long been regarded as a poor stepchild of the film industry, then telefilm horror has been the most uncelebrated offspring of all. Considered unworthy of critical attention, scary movies made for television have received little notice over the years. Yet millions of fans grew up watching them—especially during the 1970s—and remember them fondly. This exhaustive survey addresses the lack of critical attention by evaluating such films on their own merits. Covering nearly 150 made-for-TV fright movies from the 1970s, the book includes credits, a plot synopsis, and critical commentary for each. From the well-remembered Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark to the better-forgotten Look What’s Happened to Rosemary’s Baby, it’s a trustworthy and entertaining guide to the golden age of the televised horror movie.

Making and Remaking Horror in the 1970s and 2000s

Why Don’t They Do It Like They Used To?

Author: David Roche

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1617039624

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 335

View: 4991

An expansive treatment of the meanings and qualities of original and remade American horror movies

British Horror Films of the 1960s

Author: Scott V. Palmer

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781635874716

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 368

View: 2338

This book is the second in a series of books on horror films made in Great Britain. Complete cast listings and story synopses are provided, along with the running times of the films and directorial credits. Many heretofore unseen pictures are included; there is also an introduction by the late, great horror film star Sir Christopher lee.

Horror Films FAQ

All That's Left to Know About Slashers, Vampires, Zombies, Aliens, and More

Author: John Kenneth Muir

Publisher: Hal Leonard Corporation

ISBN: 1480366811

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 386

View: 2290

(FAQ). Horror Films FAQ explores a century of ghoulish and grand horror cinema, gazing at the different characters, situations, settings, and themes featured in the horror film, from final girls, monstrous bogeymen, giant monsters and vampires to the recent torture porn and found footage formats. The book remembers the J-Horror remake trend of the 2000s, and examines the oft-repeated slasher format popularized by John Carpenter's Halloween (1978) and Friday the 13th (1980). After an introduction positioning the horror film as an important and moral voice in the national dialogue, the book explores the history of horror decade by decade, remembering the women's liberation horrors of the 1970s, the rubber reality films of the late 1980s, the serial killers of the 1990s, and the xenophobic terrors of the 9/11 age. Horror Films FAQ also asks what it means when animals attack in such films as The Birds (1963) or Jaws (1975), and considers the moral underpinnings of rape-and-revenge movies, such as I Spit on Your Grave (1978) and Irreversible (2002). The book features numerous photographs from the author's extensive personal archive, and also catalogs the genre's most prominent directors.

Japanese Horror Films and their American Remakes

Author: Valerie Wee

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134109628

Category: Social Science

Page: 258

View: 9318

The Ring (2002)—Hollywood’s remake of the Japanese cult success Ringu (1998)—marked the beginning of a significant trend in the late 1990s and early 2000s of American adaptations of Asian horror films. This book explores this complex process of adaptation, paying particular attention to the various transformations that occur when texts cross cultural boundaries. Through close readings of a range of Japanese horror films and their Hollywood remakes, this study addresses the social, cultural, aesthetic and generic features of each national cinema’s approach to and representation of horror, within the subgenre of the ghost story, tracing convergences and divergences in the films’ narrative trajectories, aesthetic style, thematic focus and ideological content. In comparing contemporary Japanese horror films with their American adaptations, this book advances existing studies of both the Japanese and American cinematic traditions, by: illustrating the ways in which each tradition responds to developments in its social, cultural and ideological milieu; and, examining Japanese horror films and their American remakes through a lens that highlights cross-cultural exchange and bilateral influence. The book will be of interest to scholars of film, media, and cultural studies.

Blaxploitation Films of the 1970s

Blackness and Genre

Author: Novotny Lawrence

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135900361

Category: History

Page: 146

View: 9622

During the early years of the motion picture industry, black performers were often depicted as shuckin’ and jivin’ caricatures. Specifically, black males were portrayed as toms, coons and bucks, while the mammy and tragic mulatto archetypes circumscribed black femininity. This misrepresentation began to change in the 1950s and 1960s when performers such as Dorothy Dandridge and Sidney Poitier were cast in more positive roles. These performers paved the way for the black exploitation or blaxploitation movement, which began in 1970 and flourished until 1975. The movement is characterized by films that feature a black hero or heroine, black supporting characters, a predominately black urban setting, a display of black sexuality, excessive violence, and a contemporary rhythm and blues soundtrack. Blaxploitation films were made across varying genres, but the questionable elements of some of the pictures caused them to be referred to as "blaxploitation" films with little or no regard given to their generic categorization. This book examines how Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970), Blacula (1972), The Mack (1973), and Cleopatra Jones (1973) can be classified within the detective, horror, gangster, and cop action genres, respectively, and illustrates the manner in which the inclusion of "blackness" represents a significant revision to the aforementioned genres.

The Horror Film

Author: Peter Hutchings

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317874099

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 4561

The Horror Film is an in-depth exploration of one of the most consistently popular, but also most disreputable, of all the mainstream film genres. Since the early 1930s there has never been a time when horror films were not being produced in substantial numbers somewhere in the world and never a time when they were not being criticised, censored or banned. The Horror Film engages with the key issues raised by this most contentious of genres. It considers the reasons for horror's disreputability and seeks to explain why despite this horror has been so successful. Where precisely does the appeal of horror lie? An extended introductory chapter identifies what it is about horror that makes the genre so difficult to define. The chapter then maps out the historical development of the horror genre, paying particular attention to the international breadth and variety of horror production, with reference to films made in the United States, Britain, Italy, Spain and elsewhere. Subsequent chapters explore: The role of monsters, focusing on the vampire and the serial killer. The usefulness (and limitations) of psychological approaches to horror. The horror audience: what kind of people like horror (and what do other people think of them)? Gender, race and class in horror: how do horror films such as Bride of Frankenstein, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre and Blade relate to the social and political realities within which they are produced? Sound and horror: in what ways has sound contributed to the development of horror? Performance in horror: how have performers conveyed fear and terror throughout horror's history? 1970s horror: was this the golden age of horror production? Slashers and post-slashers: from Halloween to Scream and beyond. The Horror Film throws new light on some well-known horror films but also introduces the reader to examples of noteworthy but more obscure horror work. A final section provides a guide to further reading and an extensive bibliography. Accessibly written, The Horror Film is a lively and informative account of the genre that will appeal to students of cinema, film teachers and researchers, and horror lovers everywhere.

Vampire Films of the 1970s

Dracula to Blacula and Every Fang Between

Author: Gary A. Smith

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 147662559X

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 240

View: 9224

The 1970s were turbulent times and the films made then reflected the fact. Vampire movies—always a cinema staple—were no exception. Spurred by the worldwide success of Hammer Film’s Dracula Has Risen from the Grave (1969), vampire movies filled theaters for the next ten years—from the truly awful to bonafide classics. Audiences took the good with the bad and came back for more. Providing a critical review of the genre’s overlooked Golden Age, this book explores a mixed bag from around the world, including The Vampire Lovers (1970), Dracula Versus Frankenstein (1971), Scream, Blacula, Scream (1973), ’Salem’s Lot (1975), Dracula Sucks (1978) and Love at First Bite (1979) and many others.

Selling the Splat Pack

The DVD Revolution and the American Horror Film

Author: Mark Bernard

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748685502

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 264

View: 9208

Were brutal American horror movies like the Saw and Hostel films a reaction to the trauma of 9/11? Or was something else responsible for the rise of these violent and gory films during the first decade of the twenty-first century? This study reveals the history of how the emergence of the DVD market changed cultural and industrial attitudes about horror movies and film ratings. These changes made way for increasingly violent horror films, like those produced by the 'Splat Pack', a group of filmmakers who were heralded in the press as subversive outsiders. Taking a different tack, this study proposes that the films of the Splat Pack were products of, rather than reactions against, film industry policy. In doing so, the monograph blends film industry study with an analysis of the films themselves, revealing the films of the Splat Pack as commercial products rather than political manifestos.

The GorehoundÕs Guide to Splatter Films of the 1960s and 1970s

Author: Scott Aaron Stine

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 078649140X

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 304

View: 8837

For the uninitiated the author has obligingly supplied a definition for the slasher/splatter film: “Any motion picture which contains scenes of extreme violence in graphic and grisly detail....” For those film viewers who think this is a good thing and are more likely to select The Texas Chainsaw Massacre than The Remains of the Day, or for those who are not quite sure but are nevertheless drawn to the phantasmagoric, or for those horrified by gratuitous violence and blood for blood’s sake but are researching this filmic phenomenon, this reference book provides all the gory details. From At Midnight I'll Take Your Soul Away to Zombie 2: The Dead Are Among Us, this book is an exhaustive study of the splatter films of the 1960s and 1970s. After a history of the development of the genre, the main meat of the book is a filmography. Each entry includes extensive credits, alternate names and foreign release titles; availability of the film on videocassette; availability of soundtracks and film novelization; and reviews. Extensive cross-referencing is also included.

Critical Approaches to the Films of Robert Rodriguez

Author: Frederick Luis Aldama

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292763573

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 264

View: 2674

Frederick Aldama's The Cinema of Robert Rodriguez (2014) was the first full-scale study of one of the most prolific and significant Latino directors making films today. In this companion volume, Aldama enlists a corps of experts to analyze a majority of Rodriguez's feature films, from his first break-out success El Mariachi in 1992 to Machete in 2010. The essays explore the formal and thematic features present in his films from the perspectives of industry (context, convention, and distribution), the film blueprint (auditory and visual ingredients), and consumption (ideal and real audiences). The authors illuminate the manifold ways in which Rodriguez's films operate internally (plot, character, and event) and externally (audience perception, thought, and feeling). The volume is divided into three parts: "Matters of Mind and Media" includes essays that use psychoanalytic and cognitive psychology to shed light on how Rodriguez's films complicate Latino identity, as well as how they succeed in remaking audiences' preconceptions of the world. "Narrative Theory, Cognitive Science, and Sin City: A Case Study" offers tools and models of analysis for the study of Rodriguez's film re-creation of a comic book (on which Frank Miller was credited as codirector). "Aesthetic and Ontological Border Crossings and Borderlands" considers how Rodriguez's films innovatively critique fixed notions of Latino identity and experience, as well as open eyes to racial injustices. As a whole, the volume demonstrates how Rodriguez's career offers critical insights into the filmmaking industry, the creative process, and the consuming and reception of contemporary film.

Hearths of Darkness

The Family in the American Horror Film, Updated Edition

Author: Tony Williams

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1626743517

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 368

View: 9868

Hearths of Darkness: The Family in the American Horror Film traces the origins of the 1970s family horror subgenre to certain aspects of American culture and classical Hollywood cinema. Far from being an ephemeral and short-lived genre, horror actually relates to many facets of American history from its beginnings to the present day. Individual chapters examine aspects of the genre, its roots in the Universal horror films of the 1930s, the Val Lewton RKO unit of the 1940s, and the crucial role of Alfred Hitchcock as the father of the modern American horror film. Subsequent chapters investigate the key works of the 1970s by directors such as Larry Cohen, George A. Romero, Brian De Palma, Wes Craven, and Tobe Hooper, revealing the distinctive nature of films such as Bone, It’s Alive, God Told Me To, Carrie, The Exorcist, Exorcist 2, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, as well as the contributions of such writers as Stephen King. Williams also studies the slasher films of the 1980s and 1990s, such as the Friday the 13th series, Halloween, the remake of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, and Nightmare on Elm Street, exploring their failure to improve on the radical achievements of the films of the 1970s. After covering some post-1970s films, such as The Shining, the book concludes with a new postscript examining neglected films of the twentieth and early twenty-first century. Despite the overall decline in the American horror film, Williams determines that, far from being dead, the family horror film is still with us. Elements of family horror even appear in modern television series such as The Sopranos. This updated edition also includes a new introduction.

The Arts in the 1970s

Cultural Closure

Author: Dr Bart Moore-Gilbert,Bart Moore-Gilbert

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113485837X

Category: Social Science

Page: 324

View: 5620

Were the 1970s really `the devils decade'? Images of strikes, galloping inflation, rising unemployment and bitter social divisions evoke a period of unparalleled economic decline, political confrontation and social fragmentation. But how significant were the pessimism and self-doubt of the 1970s, and what was the legacy of its cultural conflicts? Covering the entire spectrum of the arts - drama, television, film, poetry, the novel, popular music, dance, cinema and the visual arts - The Arts in the 1970s challenges received perceptions of the decade as one of cultural decline. The collection breaks new ground in providing the first detailed analysis of the cultural production of the decade as a whole, providing an invaluable resource for all those involved in cultural, media and communications studies.