Iceland

Land of the Sagas

Author: David Roberts,Jon Krakauer

Publisher: Villard Books

ISBN: 9780375752674

Category: Travel

Page: 159

View: 4557

Photographs exploring the grandeur of Iceland's remarkable geography accompany tales of real-life heroes and supernatural beings

The End of Iceland's Innocence

The Image of Iceland in the Foreign Media During the Financial Crisis

Author: Daniel Chartier

Publisher: University of Ottawa Press

ISBN: 077660760X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 239

View: 3982

A portrait of Iceland through the eyes of the international media before and after their total economic collapse.

Feud in the Icelandic Saga

Author: Jesse L. Byock

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520082595

Category: History

Page: 293

View: 5802

Byock sees the crucial element in the origin of the Icelandic sagas not as the introduction of writing or the impact of literary borrowings from the continent but the subject of the tales themselves - feud. This simple thesis is developed into a thorough examination of Icelandic society and feud, and of the narrative technique of recounting it.

Icelanders in the Viking Age

The People of the Sagas

Author: William R. Short

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786456079

Category: History

Page: 283

View: 8706

The Sagas of Icelanders are enduring stories from Viking-age Iceland filled with love and romance, battles and feuds, tragedy and comedy. Yet these tales are little read today, even by lovers of literature. The culture and history of the people depicted in the Sagas are often unfamiliar to the modern reader, though the audience for whom the tales were intended would have had an intimate understanding of the material. This text introduces the modern reader to the daily lives and material culture of the Vikings. Topics covered include religion, housing, social customs, the settlement of disputes, and the early history of Iceland. Issues of dispute among scholars, such as the nature of settlement and the division of land, are addressed in the text.

Viking America

The First Millennium

Author: Geraldine Barnes

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

ISBN: 9780859916080

Category: History

Page: 187

View: 2482

Viking America examined through the writing and rewriting of the Vinland story from the middle ages to the twentieth century.

Sagas of the Icelanders

A Book of Essays

Author: John Tucker

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 383

View: 5972

A collection of essays on Icelandic sagas from the middle ages, which concern the earliest period of Icelandic history. Includes references.

The Land of Desolation

Author: Isaac Israel Hayes

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108071473

Category: History

Page: 372

View: 4593

This 1871 account by a seasoned Arctic explorer recounts a leisurely voyage in 1869 along the coast of Greenland.

The Growth of the Medieval Icelandic Sagas (1180-1280)

Author: Theodore Murdock Andersson

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801444081

Category: Fiction

Page: 237

View: 8914

Andersson introduces readers to the development of the Icelandic sagas between 1180 and 1280, a crucial period that witnessed a gradual shift of emphasis from tales of adventure and personal distinction to the analysis of politics and history.

Saga Land

Author: Richard Fidler,Kari Gislason

Publisher: HarperCollins Australia

ISBN: 1460708202

Category: Reference

Page: 480

View: 1434

'I adored this book - a wondrous compendium of Iceland's best sagas' - Hannah Kent A new friendship. An unforgettable journey. A beautiful and bloody history. This is Iceland as you've never read it before ... Broadcaster Richard Fidler and author Kári Gíslason are good friends. They share a deep attachment to the sagas of Iceland - the true stories of the first Viking families who settled on that remote island in the Middle Ages.These are tales of blood feuds, of dangerous women, and people who are compelled to kill the ones they love the most. The sagas are among the greatest stories ever written, but the identity of their authors is largely unknown. Together, Richard and Kári travel across Iceland, to the places where the sagas unfolded a thousand years ago. They cross fields, streams and fjords to immerse themselves in the folklore of this fiercely beautiful island. And there is another mission: to resolve a longstanding family mystery - a gift from Kari's Icelandic father that might connect him to the greatest of the saga authors.

Saga Land: the Island Stories at the Edge of the World

Author: Richard Fidler,Kari Gislason

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780733339707

Category:

Page: 512

View: 3437

'I adored this book - a wondrous compendium of Iceland's best sagas' - Hannah Kent A new friendship. An unforgettable journey. A beautiful and bloody history. This is Iceland as you've never read it before ... Broadcaster Richard Fidler and author Kári Gíslason are good friends. They share a deep attachment to the sagas of Iceland - the true stories of the first Viking families who settled on that remote island in the Middle Ages.These are tales of blood feuds, of dangerous women, and people who are compelled to kill the ones they love the most. The sagas are among the greatest stories ever written, but the identity of their authors is largely unknown. Together, Richard and Kári travel across Iceland, to the places where the sagas unfolded a thousand years ago. They cross fields, streams and fjords to immerse themselves in the folklore of this fiercely beautiful island. And there is another mission: to resolve a longstanding family mystery - a gift from Kari's Icelandic father that might connect him to the greatest of the saga authors.

The Saga of Gunnlaugur Snake's Tongue

Author: E. Paul Durrenberger,Dorothy Durrenberger

Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press

ISBN: 9780838634653

Category: Poetry

Page: 124

View: 8974

The fulfilment of a prophetic dream takes a young man from his troubled teenage years in medieval Iceland to his death in a duel with his love rival in a foreign land. Thorsteinn, son of the prominent Egill Skalla-Grimsson, also of saga fame, dreams two men will fight and die over his daughter, and that she will marry a third man. When his father forbids the headstrong Gunnlaugur from traveling to foreign lands, he takes refuge with Thorsteinn, where he studies law and becomes close to his daughter, Helga the fair. At eighteen, the stubborn and proud Gunnlaugur betroths himself to Helga and arranges with her father for her to wait for him for three years while he is away. While abroad, Gunnlaugur gets in and out of trouble with various kings and gains a reputation as both a poet and a warrior. With a show of arrogance at the court of the Swedish king, he makes an enemy of another Icelandic poet, Hrafn, who had befriended him. Having sworn to disgrace Gunnlaugur, Hrafn returns to Iceland to ask for Helga in marriage as the three years she was to wait have passed. Delayed in his travels, Gunnlaugur returns the day of the wedding but can not stop it. Gunnlaugur challenges Hrafn to the last duel ever fought in Iceland, but kinsmen and friends of both prevent the fight. The two travel to Sweden where they meet and fight. Both die as foretold in Thorsteinn's dream. Dreaming of Gunnlaugur, Helga dies in the arms of her second husband, a third poet, as the dream foretold. There the saga ends. In addition to the translation of the saga, this book contains an anthropological analysis of the saga and saga writing in medieval Iceland. Beyond relating events, this saga, like others of its genre, is an expression of the totemic system of the primitive society that produced it, a stratified society without the institutions of a state. The analysis of the saga shows its richly textured patterns of opposition and similarity, its complex analogical logic, and its fascinating mirror-image arrangement of events centering around the fatal insults between Gunnlaugur and Hrafn in Sweden. Since the saga is a product of a totemic society, the authors preserve that dimension in their translation. Rather than trying to smooth over the work to "elevate" it to modern standards of the novel, they preserve the texture of oppositions, similarities, and analogies that make the saga what it is.

Ring of Seasons

Iceland--Its Culture and History

Author: Terry G. Lacy

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472086610

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 2584

Iceland in all of its extraordinary glory

The Far Traveler

Voyages of a Viking Woman

Author: Nancy Marie Brown

Publisher: HMH

ISBN: 0547539398

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 3206

The remarkable story of Gudrid, the female explorer who sailed from Iceland to the New World a millennium ago. Five hundred years before Columbus, a Viking woman named Gudrid sailed off the edge of the known world. She landed in the New World and lived there for three years, giving birth to a baby before sailing home. Or so the Icelandic sagas say. Even after archaeologists found a Viking longhouse in Newfoundland, no one believed that the details of Gudrid’s story were true. Then, in 2001, a team of scientists discovered what may have been this pioneering woman’s last house, buried under a hay field in Iceland, just where the epic tales suggest it could be. Joining scientists experimenting with cutting-edge technology and the latest archaeological techniques, and tracing Gudrid’s steps on land and in the sagas, The Far Traveler reconstructs a life that spanned—and expanded—the bounds of the then-known world. It also sheds new light on the society that gave rise to a woman even more extraordinary than legend has painted her, and illuminates the reasons for its collapse.

The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas

Author: William Pencak

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN: 9789051838350

Category: Law

Page: 178

View: 3366

The world's longest lasting republic between ancient Rome and modern Switzerland, medieval Iceland (c. 870-1262) centered its national literature, the great family sagas, around the problem of can a republic survive and do justice to its inhabitants. The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas takes a semiotic approach to six of the major sagas which depict a nation of free men, abetted by formidable women, testing conflicting legal codes and principles - pagan v. Christian, vengeance v. compromise, monarchy v. republicanism, courts v. arbitration. The sagas emerge as a body of great literature embodying profound reflections on political and legal philosophy because they do not offer simple solutions, but demonstrate the tragic choices facing legal thinkers (Njal), warriors (Gunnar), outlaws (Grettir), women (Gudrun of Laxdaela Saga), priests (Snorri of Eyrbyggja Saga), and the Icelandic community in its quest for stability and a good society. Guest forewords by Robert Ginsberg and Roberta Kevelson, set the book in the contexts of philosophy, semiotics, and Icelandic studies to which it contributes.