Main Line of Mid-America

The Story of the Illinois Central

Author: Carlton Jonathan Corliss

Publisher: New York : Creative Age Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Railroads United States

Page: 490

View: 4533

Chicago and the Illinois Central Railroad

Author: Clifford J. Downey

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738550749

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 6390

Headquartered in Chicago, the Illinois Central Railroad was known as the "Main Line of Mid-America," as it was a major railroad cutting through the middle section of the United States with two major routes: the Main Line, which ran south out of Chicago toward New Orleans, and the Western Lines, which ran west toward Iowa. The Illinois Central Railroad had eight major freight yards in Chicago, which in 1937 handled nearly two million freight cars. It was also well known for its passenger service and operated some of the finest passenger trains: the Green Diamond, the all-Pullman Panama Limited, and the City of New Orleans. Chicago and the Illinois Central Railroad covers the railroad's operations within the city of Chicago, plus the outlying suburbs, from the late 1800s to 1960. It explores, through vintage photographs, the passenger and freight trains, suburban trains, locomotives, shops and repair facilities, and people that made the railroad function.

Illinois Central

Main Line of Mid-America: All-color photography of the largest north-south railroad in the United States

Author: Donald J. Heimburger

Publisher: Heimburger House Publishing Company

ISBN: 9780911581355

Category: Transportation

Page: 128

View: 8402

All-color book on the largest north-south railroad in the U.S.! Filled with 350 color photos, and featuring easy-to-see 10 x 11" size! Illinois Central: Main Line of Mid-America is a spectacular display of all-color photos of the first land grant railroad. This 10x11" 128-page hardbound book features a laminated cover and is bursting with beautiful photos of steam locomotives beginning with the 2-4-4T, the 0-6-0 and 0-8-0 switchers, the 2-8-2 Mikado workhorses, the 4-8-2 heavy haulers, and some odd locomotives such as the 0-8-2 and 0-10-0s, as well as many others. This exciting book also features diesels including switchers, black and white Geeps, beautiful orange, brown and yellow E passenger units, and the later model GP-20s and GP-35s. Coaches, diners, business cars and Pullman sleepers comprise the fine IC passenger equipment. Also included is suburban electric equipment from both the old era of the Pullman olive-green days and the sleek new bi-level cars. Scenes from on-line towns such as Chicago, St. Louis, Paducah, Clinton, Dubuque, Central City and Centralia are highlighted in a special section called “on the Property.” The glossy enameled text paper of this large format book provides excellent reproduction.

Immigrants on the Land

Agriculture, Rural Life, and Small Towns

Author: George E. Pozzetta

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9780824074043

Category: Social Science

Page: 396

View: 3575

First published in 1991. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Railroad and the State

War, Politics, and Technology in Nineteenth-century America

Author: Robert G. Angevine

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804742399

Category: History

Page: 351

View: 1769

This book examines the complex and changing relationship between the U.S. Army and American railroads during the nineteenth century.

Whistle in the Night

The Story of Illinois Central, Main Line of Mid-America (Classic Reprint)

Author: Illinois Central Railroad Company

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 9781391631394

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 36

View: 4629

Excerpt from Whistle in the Night: The Story of Illinois Central, Main Line of Mid-America Building a railroad across the Illinois prairies was a matter of muscle and manpower m the early days. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

The Rise of the Chicago Police Department

Class and Conflict, 1850-1894

Author: Sam Mitrani

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252095332

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 1163

In this book, Sam Mitrani cogently examines the making of the police department in Chicago, which by the late 1800s had grown into the most violent, turbulent city in America. Chicago was roiling with political and economic conflict, much of it rooted in class tensions, and the city's lawmakers and business elite fostered the growth of a professional municipal police force to protect capitalism, its assets, and their own positions in society. Together with city policymakers, the business elite united behind an ideology of order that would simultaneously justify the police force's existence and dictate its functions. Tracing the Chicago police department's growth through events such as the 1855 Lager Beer riot, the Civil War, the May Day strikes, the 1877 railroad workers strike and riot, and the Haymarket violence in 1886, Mitrani demonstrates that this ideology of order both succeeded and failed in its aims. Recasting late nineteenth-century Chicago in terms of the struggle over order, this insightful history uncovers the modern police department's role in reconciling democracy with industrial capitalism.

The Indiana Rail Road Company

America's New Regional Railroad

Author: Christopher Rund

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253346926

Category: Transportation

Page: 253

View: 4143

The Indiana Rail Road Company is an extraordinary success story among the scores of independent short line and regional railroads spawned in the wake of railroad deregulation. Christopher Rund chronicles the development of the company from its origins as part of America's first land grant railroad, the Illinois Central, through the political and financial juggling required by entrepreneur Tom Hoback to purchase the line when it fell into disrepair. The company was reborn as a robust, profitable carrier and has become a new model for the American regional railroad. The Indiana Rail Road Company is unique among chronicles of these small railroads. It draws together a historical perspective, as well as a detailed narrative of the business aspects of rehabilitating the rail line and transforming it into a profitable enterprise. The book also touches on a variety of subtopics, significantly the application of new technologies to manage costs and improve productivity. The Indiana Rail Road Company pioneered the most significant of these in the United States.

Abraham Lincoln and the Illinois Central Railroad

main line of mid-America; its organization, financing, and subsequent simplification of debt and capital structure through May 1955

Author: Edwin Sherwood Stowell Sunderland

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 117

View: 803

The Picture Frame, and Other Stories

Author: Robert Drake

Publisher: Mercer University Press

ISBN: 9780865546899

Category: Fiction

Page: 176

View: 2325

"Drake deals with the complexities of human experience as lived in the times and places and events he has framed by the microscopic and telescopic lens of his stories. Drake's stories are the best kind of history, showing us who we are by virtue of where we have been and what we have done. And in spite of Drake's own protests there are lessons to be learned from these stories, about ourselves, about the human condition, diagnosis and prognosis."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Lincoln and McClellan

The Troubled Partnership between a President and His General

Author: John C. Waugh

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 9780230106765

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 572

There was no more remarkable pair in the Civil War than Abraham Lincoln and George McClellan. At only 35 years old, McClellan commanded the Ohio troops early in the war, and won skirmishes for the Union in western Virginia. After the disastrous Union defeat at Bull Run in the summer of 1861, Lincoln sent word for McClellan to come to Washington, and soon elevated him to commander-in-chief of the Union army. But in the late summer and fall of 1861, things took a turn for the worst. Meticulous in his planning and preparations, McClellan began to delay attacking the enemy and developed a penchant for vastly overestimating the Confederate forces he faced. All of this hampered his ability to lead an aggressive force in a fast-moving battlefield environment. Finally losing his patience, Lincoln was famously quoted as saying, "If General McClellan does not want to use the army, I would like to borrow it for a time." Lincoln and McClellan takes an in-depth look at this fascinating relationship, from the early days of the Civil War to the 1864 presidential election when McClellan ran against Lincoln on an anti-war platform and lost. Here, award-winning author John C. Waugh weaves a tale of hubris, paranoia, failure, and triumph, illuminating as never before this unique and complicated alliance.

American Locomotives in Historic Photographs

1858 to 1949

Author: Ron Ziel

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486136191

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 144

View: 4523

A rare collection of 126 meticulously detailed official photographs, called "builder portraits," majestically chronicle the rise of steam locomotive power in America. Introduction. Detailed captions.

The Pullman News

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 567

The Supreme Court Reborn

The Constitutional Revolution in the Age of Roosevelt

Author: William E. Leuchtenburg

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199839387

Category: Law

Page: 368

View: 6588

For almost sixty years, the results of the New Deal have been an accepted part of political life. Social Security, to take one example, is now seen as every American's birthright. But to validate this revolutionary legislation, Franklin Roosevelt had to fight a ferocious battle against the opposition of the Supreme Court--which was entrenched in laissez faire orthodoxy. After many lost battles, Roosevelt won his war with the Court, launching a Constitutional revolution that went far beyond anything he envisioned. In The Supreme Court Reborn, esteemed scholar William E. Leuchtenburg explores the critical episodes of the legal revolution that created the Court we know today. Leuchtenburg deftly portrays the events leading up to Roosevelt's showdown with the Supreme Court. Committed to laissez faire doctrine, the conservative "Four Horsemen"--Justices Butler, Van Devanter, Sutherland, and McReynolds, aided by the swing vote of Justice Owen Roberts--struck down one regulatory law after another, outraging Roosevelt and much of the Depression-stricken nation. Leuchtenburg demonstrates that Roosevelt thought he had the backing of the country as he prepared a scheme to undermine the Four Hoursemen. Famous (or infamous) as the "Court-packing plan," this proposal would have allowed the president to add one new justice for every sitting justice over the age of seventy. The plan picked up considerable momentum in Congress; it was only after a change in the voting of Justice Roberts (called "the switch in time that saved nine") and the death of Senate Majority Leader Joseph T. Robinson that it shuddered to a halt. Rosevelt's persistence led to one of his biggest legislative defeats. Despite the failure of the Court-packing plan, however, the president won his battle with the Supreme Court; one by one, the Four Horsemen left the bench, to be replaced by Roosevelt appointees. Leuchtenburg explores the far-reaching nature of FDR's victory. As a consequence of the Constitutional Revolution that began in 1937, not only was the New Deal upheld (as precedent after precedent was overturned), but also the Court began a dramatic expansion of Civil liberties that would culminate in the Warren Court. Among the surprises was Senator Hugo Black, who faced widespread opposition for his lack of qualifications when he was appointed as associate justice; shortly afterward, a reporter revealed that he had been a member of the Ku Klux Klan. Despite that background, Black became an articulate spokesman for individual liberty. William E. Leuchtenburg is one of America's premier historians, a scholar who combines depth of learning with a graceful style. This superbly crafted book sheds new light on the great Constitutional crisis of our century, illuminating the legal and political battles that created today's Supreme Court.

The Vital Few

The Entrepreneur and American Economic Progress

Author: Jonathan Hughes

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199923248

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 640

View: 3380

The Vital Few, a study of the contribution of entrepreneurs to the American economy, provides portraits of the men and women whose individual enterprise has helped to establish the character of the American businessperson and to carry our economy forward from colonial times. Examining such legendary figures as William Penn, Eli Whitney, Henry Ford, and J. Pierpont Morgan in their social and economic environment, Jonathan Hughes illuminates each period of American economic history and provides insights into the workings of American business and the special qualities required of its super-achievers. Taking into account such dramatic changes in the economy as the explosive growth of government and the puzzling effects of "stagflation," Hughes has now expanded his original volume. The new edition includes two additional biographies and a short essay on the nature of bureaucracy in both the government and the private sector. Both biographies are of "bureaucratic entrepreneurs", whose work in the federal government represents the two most prominent trends in government economics. Mary Switzer's 48-year career demonstrates the ways in which the modern welfare state has developed. First a catalyst then a major force in establishing social programs and institutions, she is in large part responsible for the existence of the American welfare state. Marriner Eccles's career, on the other hand, shows the evolution of "compensatory" fiscal and monetary policies from the New Deal to the Korean War. A self-made millionaire who was appointed to a high-level job in the federal government, Eccles quit his post after 1950, convinced that American economic policy was hopelessly inflationary and economically destructive. With these new additions, The Vital Few, long a source of inspiration and economic interest, is more accessible and useful than ever.

Kentucky and the Illinois Central Railroad

Author: Clifford J. Downey

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1439622442

Category: Transportation

Page: 128

View: 899

The Illinois Central Railroad (ICRR) operated approximately 600 miles of mainline track throughout the Commonwealth of Kentucky, stretching from the Mississippi River to the central part of the state. In addition to Louisville, the state’s largest city, the ICRR also served dozens of small towns. Kentucky’s economy was built around coal mining and farming, and the ICRR played a major role in both industries. ICRR’s coal trains served as a conveyor for Kentucky coal moving to Midwest factories, and the road hauled a wide variety of agricultural products, including tobacco, grain, and fresh fruit. No mention of the ICRR would be complete without discussing the fleet of fast passenger trains that whisked Kentucky residents to and from distant cities. To maintain the locomotives that hauled all these trains the ICRR operated one of the nation’s largest locomotive repair shops in Paducah.