Indigenous Statistics

A Quantitative Research Methodology

Author: Maggie Walter,Chris Andersen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315426552

Category: Social Science

Page: 159

View: 9340

In the first book ever published on Indigenous quantitative methodologies, Maggie Walter and Chris Andersen open up a major new approach to research across the disciplines and applied fields. While qualitative methods have been rigorously critiqued and reformulated, the population statistics relied on by virtually all research on Indigenous peoples continue to be taken for granted as straightforward, transparent numbers. This book dismantles that persistent positivism with a forceful critique, then fills the void with a new paradigm for Indigenous quantitative methods, using concrete examples of research projects from First World Indigenous peoples in the United States, Australia, and Canada. Concise and accessible, it is an ideal supplementary text as well as a core component of the methodological toolkit for anyone conducting Indigenous research or using Indigenous population statistics.

Indigenous Statistics

A Quantitative Research Methodology

Author: Maggie Walter,Chris Andersen

Publisher: Left Coast Press

ISBN: 1611322936

Category: Social Science

Page: 158

View: 5503

The first book on Indigenous quantitative methodologies, this concise, accessible text opens up a major new approach for research across the disciplines and applied fields.

Indigenous Statistics

A Quantitative Research Methodology

Author: Maggie Walter,Chris Andersen

Publisher: Left Coast Press

ISBN: 9781611322927

Category: Social Science

Page: 144

View: 8889

In the first book ever published on Indigenous quantitative methodologies, Maggie Walter and Chris Andersen open up a major new approach to research across the disciplines and applied fields. While qualitative methods have been rigorously critiqued and reformulated, the population statistics relied on by virtually all research on Indigenous peoples continue to be taken for granted as straightforward, transparent numbers. This book dismantles that persistent positivism with a forceful critique, then fills the void with a new paradigm for Indigenous quantitative methods, using concrete examples of research projects from First World Indigenous peoples in the United States, Australia, and Canada. Concise and accessible, it is an ideal supplementary text as well as a core component of the methodological toolkit for anyone conducting Indigenous research or using Indigenous population statistics.

Indigenous Research Methodologies

Author: Bagele Chilisa

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1412958822

Category: Social Science

Page: 343

View: 8837

Following the increasing emphasis in the classroom and in the field to sensitize researchers and students to diverse epistemologies, methods, and methodologies - especially those of women, minority groups, former colonized societies, indigenous people, historically oppressed communities, and people with disabilities, author Bagele Chilisa has written the first research methods textbook that situates research in a larger, historical, cultural, and global context with case studies from around the globe to make very visible the specific methodologies that are commensurate with the transformative paradigm of research and the historical and cultural traditions of indigenous peoples. Chapters cover the history of research methods, colonial epistemologies, research within postcolonial societies, relational epistemologies, emergent and indigenous methodologies, Afrocentric research, feminist research, language frameworks, interviewing, and building partnerships between researchers and the researched. The book comes replete with traditional textbook features such as key points, exercises, and suggested readings, which makes it ideally suited for graduate courses in research methods, especially in education, health, women's studies, cultural studies, sociology, and related social sciences.

Indigenous Methodologies

Characteristics, Conversations, and Contexts

Author: Margaret Elizabeth Kovach

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442697121

Category: Social Science

Page: 207

View: 1536

What are Indigenous research methodologies, and how do they unfold? Indigenous methodologies flow from tribal knowledge, and while they are allied with several western qualitative approaches, they remain distinct. These are the focal considerations of Margaret Kovach's study,which offers guidance to those conducting research in the academy using Indigenous methodologies. Kovach includes topics such as Indigenous epistemologies, decolonizing theory, story as method, situating self and culture, Indigenous methods, protocol, meaning-making, and ethics. In exploring these elements, the book interweaves perspectives from six Indigenous researchers who share their stories, and also includes excerpts from the author's own journey into Indigenous methodologies. Indigenous Methodologies is an innovative and important contribution to the emergent discourse on Indigenous research approaches and will be of use to graduate students, professors, and community-based researchers of all backgrounds - both within the academy and beyond.

Research as Resistance, 2e

Revisiting Critical, Indigenous, and Anti-Oppressive Approaches

Author: Leslie Brown,Susan Strega

Publisher: Canadian Scholars’ Press

ISBN: 1551308827

Category: Indians of North America

Page: 276

View: 1000

Indigenous Data Sovereignty

Toward an agenda

Author: Tahu Kukutai,John Taylor

Publisher: ANU Press

ISBN: 1760460311

Category: Social Science

Page: 318

View: 784

As the global ‘data revolution’ accelerates, how can the data rights and interests of indigenous peoples be secured? Premised on the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, this book argues that indigenous peoples have inherent and inalienable rights relating to the collection, ownership and application of data about them, and about their lifeways and territories. As the first book to focus on indigenous data sovereignty, it asks: what does data sovereignty mean for indigenous peoples, and how is it being used in their pursuit of self-determination? The varied group of mostly indigenous contributors theorise and conceptualise this fast-emerging field and present case studies that illustrate the challenges and opportunities involved. These range from indigenous communities grappling with issues of identity, governance and development, to national governments and NGOs seeking to formulate a response to indigenous demands for data ownership. While the book is focused on the CANZUS states of Canada, Australia, Aotearoa/New Zealand and the United States, much of the content and discussion will be of interest and practical value to a broader global audience. ‘A debate-shaping book … it speaks to a fast-emerging field; it has a lot of important things to say; and the timing is right.’ — Stephen Cornell, Professor of Sociology and Faculty Chair of the Native Nations Institute, University of Arizona ‘The effort … in this book to theorise and conceptualise data sovereignty and its links to the realisation of the rights of indigenous peoples is pioneering and laudable.’ — Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Baguio City, Philippines

Sources and Methods in Indigenous Studies

Author: Chris Andersen,Jean M. O'Brien

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1315528843

Category: History

Page: 314

View: 4050

Sources and Methods in Indigenous Studies is a synthesis of changes and innovations in methodologies in Indigenous Studies, focusing on sources over a broad chronological and geographical range. Written by a group of highly respected Indigenous Studies scholars from across an array of disciplines, this collection offers insight into the methodological approaches contributors take to research, and how these methods have developed in recent years. The book has a two-part structure that looks, firstly, at the theoretical and disciplinary movement of Indigenous Studies within history, literature, anthropology, and the social sciences. Chapters in this section reveal that, while engaging with other disciplines, Indigenous Studies has forged its own intellectual path by borrowing and innovating from other fields. In part two, the book examines the many different areas with which sources for indigenous history have been engaged, including the importance of family, gender, feminism, and sexuality, as well as various elements of expressive culture such as material culture, literature, and museums. Together, the chapters offer readers an overview of the dynamic state of the field in Indigenous Studies. This book shines a spotlight on the ways in which scholarship is transforming Indigenous Studies in methodologically innovative and exciting ways, and will be essential reading for students and scholars in the field.

Handbook of Critical and Indigenous Methodologies

Author: Norman K. Denzin,Yvonna S. Lincoln

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1412918030

Category: Social Science

Page: 604

View: 6276

The Handbook of Critical Methodologies covers everything from the history of critical and indigenous theory and how it came to inform and impact qualitative research and indigenous peoples to the critical constructs themselves, including race/diversity, gender representation (queer theory, feminism), culture, and politics to the meaning of "critical" concepts within specific disciplines (critical psychology, critical communication/mass communication, media studies, cultural studies, political economy, education, sociology, anthropology, history, etc. - all in an effort to define emancipatory research and explore what critical qualitative research can do for social change and social justice.

Indigeneity in the Courtroom

Law, Culture, and the Production of Difference in North American Courts

Author: Jennifer A. Hamilton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135864446

Category: Law

Page: 142

View: 6187

The central question of this book is when and how does indigeneity in its various iterations – cultural, social, political, economic, even genetic – matter in a legal sense? Indigeneity in the Courtroom focuses on the legal deployment of indigenous difference in US and Canadian courts in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Through ethnographic and historical research, Hamilton traces dimensions of indigeneity through close readings of four legal cases, each of which raises important questions about law, culture, and the production of difference. She looks at the realm of law, seeking to understand how indigeneity is legally produced and to apprehend its broader political and economic implications.

Who's Asking?

Native Science, Western Science, and Science Education

Author: Douglas L. Medin,Megan Bang

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262026627

Category: Education

Page: 304

View: 1492

Analysis and case studies show that including different orientations toward the natural world makes for more effective scientific practice and science education.

Métis

Race, Recognition, and the Struggle for Indigenous Peoplehood

Author: Chris Andersen

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 0774827238

Category: Social Science

Page: 285

View: 9056

Ask any Canadian what "Métis" means, and they will likely say "mixed race." Canadians consider Métis mixed in ways that other Indigenous people are not, and the census and courts have premised their recognition of Métis status on this race-based understanding. Andersen argues that Canada got it wrong. From its roots deep in the colonial past, the idea of Métis as mixed has slowly pervaded the Canadian consciousness until it settled in the realm of common sense. In the process, "Métis" has become a racial category rather than the identity of an Indigenous people with a shared sense of history and culture.

Decolonizing Methodologies

Research and Indigenous Peoples

Author: Professor Linda Tuhiwai Smith

Publisher: Zed Books Ltd.

ISBN: 1848139535

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 2721

'A landmark in the process of decolonizing imperial Western knowledge.' Walter Mignolo, Duke University To the colonized, the term 'research' is conflated with European colonialism; the ways in which academic research has been implicated in the throes of imperialism remains a painful memory. This essential volume explores intersections of imperialism and research - specifically, the ways in which imperialism is embedded in disciplines of knowledge and tradition as 'regimes of truth.' Concepts such as 'discovery' and 'claiming' are discussed and an argument presented that the decolonization of research methods will help to reclaim control over indigenous ways of knowing and being. Now in its eagerly awaited second edition, this bestselling book has been substantially revised, with new case-studies and examples and important additions on new indigenous literature, the role of research in indigenous struggles for social justice, which brings this essential volume urgently up-to-date.

Decolonizing Educational Research

From Ownership to Answerability

Author: Leigh Patel

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317331400

Category: Education

Page: 104

View: 3953

Decolonizing Educational Research examines the ways through which coloniality manifests in contexts of knowledge and meaning making, specifically within educational research and formal schooling. Purposefully situated beyond popular deconstructionist theory and anthropocentric perspectives, the book investigates the longstanding traditions of oppression, racism, and white supremacy that are systemically reseated and reinforced by learning and social interaction. Through these meaningful explorations into the unfixed and often interrupted narratives of culture, history, place, and identity, a bold, timely, and hopeful vision emerges to conceive of how research in secondary and higher education institutions might break free of colonial genealogies and their widespread complicities.

White Logic, White Methods

Racism and Methodology

Author: Tukufu Zuberi,Eduardo Bonilla-Silva

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742542815

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 3366

Examines how the racial lenses of the social sciences and the subscription of social scientists to whites' racial common sense have limited their understanding of racial matters and handicapped their capacity to appreciate the significance of the "race effect" (they call it the "racial stratification effect"). With an assemblage of leading scholars, White Logic, White Methods explores the possibilities and necessary dethroning of current social research practices, and demands a complete overhaul of current methods, towards a multicultural and pluralist approach to what we know, think, and question. Readers in various social sciences will find useful the chapters in the collection,but all will agree that the introductory and concluding chapters to the volume (Towards a Definition of White Logic and White Methods, and Telling the Real Tale of the Hunt: Towards a Race Conscious Sociology of Racial Stratification) are likely to become classics in the field of racial and ethnic relations.

Indigenous Pathways into Social Research

Voices of a New Generation

Author: Donna M Mertens,Fiona Cram,Bagele Chilisa

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315426676

Category: Social Science

Page: 413

View: 3503

A new generation of indigenous researchers is taking its place in the world of social research in increasing numbers. These scholars provide new insights into communities under the research gaze and offer new ways of knowing to traditional scholarly models. They also move the research community toward more sensitive and collaborative practices. But it comes at a cost. Many in this generation have met with resistance or indifference in their journeys through the academic system and in the halls of power. They also often face ethical quandaries or even strong opposition from their own communities. The life stories in this book present the journeys of over 30 indigenous researchers from six continents and many different disciplines. They show, in their own words, the challenges, paradoxes, and oppression they have faced, their strategies for overcoming them, and how their work has produced more meaningful research and a more just society.

Reclaiming Indigenous Planning

Author: Ryan Walker,Ted Jojola

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 0773589945

Category: Social Science

Page: 536

View: 6892

Centuries-old community planning practices in Indigenous communities in Canada, the United States, New Zealand, and Australia have, in modern times, been eclipsed by ill-suited western approaches, mostly derived from colonial and neo-colonial traditions. Since planning outcomes have failed to reflect the rights and interests of Indigenous people, attempts to reclaim planning have become a priority for many Indigenous nations throughout the world. In Reclaiming Indigenous Planning, scholars and practitioners connect the past and present to facilitate better planning for the future. With examples from the Canadian Arctic to the Australian desert, and the cities, towns, reserves and reservations in between, contributors engage topics including Indigenous mobilization and resistance, awareness-raising and seven-generations visioning, Indigenous participation in community planning processes, and forms of governance. Relying on case studies and personal narratives, these essays emphasize the critical need for Indigenous communities to reclaim control of the political, socio-cultural, and economic agendas that shape their lives. The first book to bring Indigenous and non-Indigenous authors together across continents, Reclaiming Indigenous Planning shows how urban and rural communities around the world are reformulating planning practices that incorporate traditional knowledge, cultural identity, and stewardship over land and resources. Contributors include Robert Adkins (Community and Economic Development Consultant, USA), Chris Andersen (Alberta), Giovanni Attili (La Sapienza), Aaron Aubin (Dillon Consulting), Shaun Awatere (Landcare Research, New Zealand), Yale Belanger (Lethbridge), Keith Chaulk (Memorial), Stephen Cornell (Arizona), Sherrie Cross (Macquarie), Kim Doohan (Native Title and Resource Claims Consultant, Australia), Kerri Jo Fortier (Simpcw First Nation), Bethany Haalboom (Victoria University, New Zealand), Lisa Hardess (Hardess Planning Inc.), Garth Harmsworth (Landcare Research, New Zealand), Sharon Hausam (Pueblo of Laguna), Michael Hibbard (Oregon), Richard Howitt (Macquarie), Ted Jojola (New Mexico), Tanira Kingi (AgResearch, New Zealand), Marcus Lane (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Australia), Rebecca Lawrence (Umea), Gaim Lunkapis (Malaysia Sabah), Laura Mannell (Planning Consultant, Canada), Hirini Matunga (Lincoln University, New Zealand), Deborah McGregor (Toronto), Oscar Montes de Oca (AgResearch, New Zealand), Samantha Muller (Flinders), David Natcher (Saskatchewan), Frank Palermo (Dalhousie), Robert Patrick (Saskatchewan), Craig Pauling (Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority, New Zealand), Kurt Peters (Oregon State), Libby Porter (Monash), Andrea Procter (Memorial), Sarah Prout (Combined Universities Centre for Rural Health, Australia), Catherine Robinson (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Australia), Shadrach Rolleston (Planning Consultant, New Zealand), Leonie Sandercock (British Columbia), Crispin Smith (Planning Consultant, Canada), Sandie Suchet-Pearson (Macquarie), Siri Veland (Brown), Ryan Walker (Saskatchewan), Liz Wedderburn (AgResearch, New Zealand).

Dressing In Feathers

The Construction Of The Indian In American Popular Culture

Author: S. Elizabeth Bird

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0429980531

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 8716

One hundred members of NatChat, an electronic mail discussion group concerned with Native American issues, responded to the recent Disney release Pocahontas by calling on parents to boycott the movie, citing its historical inaccuracies and saying that ?Disney has let us down in a cruel, irresponsible manner.? Their anger was rooted in the fact that, although Disney claimed that the film's portrayal of American Indians would be ?authentic,? the Pocahontas story their movie told was really white cultural myth. The actual histories of the characters were replaced by mythic narratives depicting the crucial moments when aid was given to the white settlers. As reconstructed, the story serves to reassert for whites their right to be here, easing any lingering guilt about the displacement of the native inhabitants.To understand current imagery, it is essential to understand the history of its making, and these essays mesh to create a powerful, interconnected account of image creation over the past 150 years. The contributors, who represent a range of disciplines and specialties, reveal the distortions and fabrications white culture has imposed on significant historical and current events, as represented by treasured artifacts, such as photographic images taken of Sitting Bull following his surrender, the national monument at the battlefield of Little Bighorn, nineteenth-century advertising, the television phenomenon Northern Exposure, and the film Dances with Wolves.Well illustrated, this volume demonstrates the complacency of white culture in its representation of its troubled relationship with American Indians.

Research for Indigenous Survival

Indigenous Research Methodologies in the Behavioral Sciences

Author: Lori Lambert

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 1934594121

Category: Social Science

Page: 241

View: 7666

"Dr. Lori Lambert (Mi'kmaq/Abenaki) writes about the problems of adjusting research methodologies in the behavioral sciences to Native values and tribal community life. In addition to surveying the literature with an emphasis on native authors, she has interviewed a sampling of Indigenous people in Montana's Flathead Indian Reservation; Australia; and Northern Canada. Members of four Indigenous communities speak up about what they expect from researchers who come into their communities. Their voices and stories provide a conceptual framework to western researchers who anticipate doing research with Indigenous peoples, whether it be in the social, behavioral, or environmental sciences. The conceptual framework that their stories have created gives hope and empowerment to Indigenous communities as they endeavor to pass on their values and stories to future generations.Today Indigenous peoples are developing Indigenous Research Methodologies from stories told by elders. These methods allow researchers to respect Native communities and contribute to their healing and empowerment.Indigenous research is not a new phenomenon. People indigenous to their place have known since time immemorial how their world works. By careful observation, they have always been researchers. In countless Indigenous communities, these story keepers have preserved the knowledge of their community's past." -- Publisher's description

Planning for Coexistence?

Recognizing Indigenous rights through land-use planning in Canada and Australia

Author: Libby Porter,Janice Barry

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317080165

Category: Political Science

Page: 232

View: 9958

Planning is becoming one of the key battlegrounds for Indigenous people to negotiate meaningful articulation of their sovereign territorial and political rights, reigniting the essential tension that lies at the heart of Indigenous-settler relations. But what actually happens in the planning contact zone - when Indigenous demands for recognition of coexisting political authority over territory intersect with environmental and urban land-use planning systems in settler-colonial states? This book answers that question through a critical examination of planning contact zones in two settler-colonial states: Victoria, Australia and British Columbia, Canada. Comparing the experiences of four Indigenous communities who are challenging and renegotiating land-use planning in these places, the book breaks new ground in our understanding of contemporary Indigenous land justice politics. It is the first study to grapple with what it means for planning to engage with Indigenous peoples in major cities, and the first of its kind to compare the underlying conditions that produce very different outcomes in urban and non-urban planning contexts. In doing so, the book exposes the costs and limits of the liberal mode of recognition as it comes to be articulated through planning, challenging the received wisdom that participation and consultation can solve conflicts of sovereignty. This book lays the theoretical, methodological and practical groundwork for imagining what planning for coexistence might look like: a relational, decolonizing planning praxis where self-determining Indigenous peoples invite settler-colonial states to their planning table on their terms.