Insanity and the Lunatic Asylum in the Nineteenth Century

Author: Serena Trowbridge

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317318552

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 7394

The nineteenth-century asylum was the scene of both terrible abuses and significant advancements in treatment and care. The essays in this collection look at the asylum from the perspective of the place itself – its architecture, funding and purpose – and at the experience of those who were sent there.

Insanity and the Lunatic Asylum in the Nineteenth Century

Author: Serena Trowbridge

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317318544

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 3722

The nineteenth-century asylum was the scene of both terrible abuses and significant advancements in treatment and care. The essays in this collection look at the asylum from the perspective of the place itself – its architecture, funding and purpose – and at the experience of those who were sent there.

Committed to the State Asylum

Insanity and Society in Nineteenth-century Quebec and Ontario

Author: James E. Moran

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780773521896

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 2908

Committed to the State Asylum examines the evolution of the asylum as the response to insanity in nineteenth-century Quebec and Ontario. Focusing on the creation and development of government-funded asylums for the insane - among the largest and most important nineteenth-century institutions in both provinces - James Moran argues that asylum development was the result of complex relationships among a wide array of people, including state inspectors and administrators, asylum doctors, local magistrates, jail surgeons, religious authorities, and the relatives and neighbours of those who were considered to be insane. Unlike other studies, Committed to the State Asylum shows the important role that the community played in shaping the asylum and tackles the thorny issue of state development, explaining how state asylums developed differently in each province. Moran considers Canada's pioneering institutional efforts at dealing with the criminally insane and why those efforts lasted only a short time, shedding new light on the debate about the nature and extent of state involvement in nineteenth-century Canadian society. Committed to the State Asylum offers new insights into the ways in which both ordinary families and the state understood and responded to those they thought had crossed the boundaries of sane behaviour.

Lunatics, Imbeciles and Idiots

A History of Insanity in Nineteenth-Century Britain and Ireland

Author: Kathryn Burtinshaw,John R F Burt

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 1473879051

Category: Medical

Page: 248

View: 6810

In the first half of the nineteenth century, treatment of the mentally ill in Britain and Ireland underwent radical change. No longer manacled, chained and treated like wild animals, patient care was defined in law and medical understanding, and treatment of insanity developed. Focusing on selected cases, this new study enables the reader to understand how progressively advancing attitudes and expectations affected decisions, leading to better legislation and medical practice throughout the century. Specific mental health conditions are discussed in detail and the treatments patients received are analysed in an expert way. A clear view of why institutional asylums were established, their ethos for the treatment of patients, and how they were run as palaces rather than prisons giving moral therapy to those affected becomes apparent. The changing ways in which patients were treated, and altered societal views to the incarceration of the mentally ill, are explored. The book is thoroughly illustrated and contains images of patients and asylum staff never previously published, as well as first-hand accounts of life in a nineteenth-century asylum from a patients perspective. Written for genealogists as well as historians, this book contains clear information concerning access to asylum records and other relevant primary sources and how to interpret their contents in a meaningful way.

Theaters of Madness

Insane Asylums and Nineteenth-Century American Culture

Author: Benjamin Reiss

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226709655

Category: Psychology

Page: 240

View: 2557

In the mid-1800s, a utopian movement to rehabilitate the insane resulted in a wave of publicly funded asylums—many of which became unexpected centers of cultural activity. Housed in magnificent structures with lush grounds, patients participated in theatrical programs, debating societies, literary journals, schools, and religious services. Theaters of Madness explores both the culture these rich offerings fomented and the asylum’s place in the fabric of nineteenth-century life, reanimating a time when the treatment of the insane was a central topic in debates over democracy, freedom, and modernity. Benjamin Reiss explores the creative lives of patients and the cultural demands of their doctors. Their frequently clashing views turned practically all of American culture—from blackface minstrel shows to the works of William Shakespeare—into a battlefield in the war on insanity. Reiss also shows how asylums touched the lives and shaped the writing of key figures, such as Emerson and Poe, who viewed the system alternately as the fulfillment of a democratic ideal and as a kind of medical enslavement. Without neglecting this troubling contradiction, Theaters of Madness prompts us to reflect on what our society can learn from a generation that urgently and creatively tried to solve the problem of mental illness.

Investigating the Body in the Victorian Asylum

Doctors, Patients, and Practices

Author: Jennifer Wallis

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319567144

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 5369

This book is open access under a CC BY 4.0 license. This book explores how the body was investigated in the late nineteenth-century asylum in Britain. As more and more Victorian asylum doctors looked to the bodily fabric to reveal the ‘truth’ of mental disease, a whole host of techniques and technologies were brought to bear upon the patient's body. These practices encompassed the clinical and the pathological, from testing the patient's reflexes to dissecting the brain. Investigating the Body in the Victorian Asylum takes a unique approach to the topic, conducting a chapter-by-chapter dissection of the body. It considers how asylum doctors viewed and investigated the skin, muscles, bones, brain, and bodily fluids. The book demonstrates the importance of the body in nineteenth-century psychiatry as well as how the asylum functioned as a site of research, and will be of value to historians of psychiatry, the body, and scientific practice.

The Architecture of Madness

Insane Asylums in the United States

Author: Carla Yanni

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 9780816649396

Category: Medical

Page: 191

View: 9754

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Life in the Victorian Asylum

The World of Nineteenth Century Mental Health Care

Author: Mark Stevens

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1473842387

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 4708

Life in the Victorian Asylum reconstructs the lost world of the nineteenth century public asylums. This fresh take on the history of mental health reveals why county asylums were built, the sort of people they housed and the treatments they received, as well as the enduring legacy of these remarkable institutions. Mark Stevens, the best-selling author of Broadmoor Revealed, is a professional archivist and expert on asylum records. In this book, he delves into Victorian mental health archives to recreate the experience of entering an asylum and being treated there, perhaps for a lifetime. Praise for Broadmoor Revealed 'Superb,' Family Tree magazine 'Detailed and thoughtful,' Times Literary Supplement 'Paints a fascinating picture,' Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine

Prisons, Asylums, and the Public

Institutional Visiting in the Nineteenth Century

Author: Janet Miron

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 0802095135

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 4275

The prisons and asylums of Canada and the United States were a popular destination for institutional tourists in the nineteenth-century. Thousands of visitors entered their walls, recording and describing the interiors, inmates, and therapeutic and reformative practices they encountered in letters, diaries, and articles. Surprisingly, the vast majority of these visitors were not members of the medical or legal elite but were ordinary people. Prisons, Asylums, and the Public argues that, rather than existing in isolation, these institutions were closely connected to the communities beyond their walls. Challenging traditional interpretations of public visiting, Janet Miron examines the implications and imperatives of visiting from the perspectives of officials, the public, and the institutionalized. Finding that institutions could be important centres of civic activity, self-edification, and 'scientific' study, Prisons, Asylums, and the Public sheds new light on popular nineteenth-century attitudes towards the insane and the criminal.

The Cost of Insanity in Nineteenth-Century Ireland

Public, Voluntary and Private Asylum Care

Author: Alice Mauger

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319652443

Category: History

Page: 281

View: 3366

This open access book is the first comparative study of public, voluntary and private asylums in nineteenth-century Ireland. Examining nine institutions, it explores whether concepts of social class and status and the emergence of a strong middle class informed interactions between gender, religion, identity and insanity. It questions whether medical and lay explanations of mental illness and its causes, and patient experiences, were influenced by these concepts. The strong emphasis on land and its interconnectedness with notions of class identity and respectability in Ireland lends a particularly interesting dimension. The book interrogates the popular notion that relatives were routinely locked away to be deprived of land or inheritance, querying how often “land grabbing” Irish families really abused the asylum system for their personal economic gain. The book will be of interest to scholars of nineteenth-century Ireland and the history of psychiatry and medicine in Britain and Ireland.

A Space of Their Own: The Archaeology of Nineteenth Century Lunatic Asylums in Britain, South Australia and Tasmania

Author: Susan Piddock

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 0387733868

Category: Medical

Page: 265

View: 8318

Employing the considerable archaeological and historical skills in her armory, Susan Piddock tries to lift the lid on the lunatic asylums of years gone by. Films and television programs have portrayed them as places of horror where the patients are restrained and left to listen to the cries of their fellow inmates in despair. But what was the world of nineteenth century lunatic asylums really like? Are these images true, or are we laboring under a misunderstanding?

Women and Madness

Author: Phyllis Chesler

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 164160039X

Category: Psychology

Page: 432

View: 808

Feminist icon Phyllis Chesler's pioneering work, Women and Madness, remains startlingly relevant today, nearly 50 years since its first publication in 1972. With over 2.5 million copies sold, this seminal book is unanimously regarded as the definitive work on the subject of women's psychology. Now back in print this completely revised and updated edition from 2005 adds to her original research and findings perspectives on the issues of eating disorders, postpartum depression, biological psychology, important feminist political findings, female genital mutilation and more.

The Last Asylum

A Memoir of Madness in Our Times

Author: Barbara Taylor

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022627408X

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 6540

In the late 1970s, Barbara Taylor, then an acclaimed young historian, began to suffer from severe anxiety. In the years that followed, Taylor’s world contracted around her illness. Eventually, her struggles were severe enough to lead to her admission to what had once been England’s largest psychiatric institution, the infamous Friern Mental Hospital in North London. The Last Asylum is Taylor’s breathtakingly blunt and brave account of those years. In it, Taylor draws not only on her experience as a historian, but also, more importantly, on her own lived history at Friern— once known as the Colney Hatch Lunatic Asylum and today the site of a luxury apartment complex. Taylor was admitted to Friern in July 1988, not long before England’s asylum system began to undergo dramatic change: in a development that was mirrored in America, the 1990s saw the old asylums shuttered, their patients left to plot courses through a perpetually overcrowded and underfunded system of community care. But Taylor contends that the emptying of the asylums also marked a bigger loss, a loss of community. She credits her own recovery to the help of a steadfast psychoanalyst and a loyal circle of friends— from Magda, Taylor’s manic-depressive roommate, to Fiona, who shares tips for navigating the system and stories of her boyfriend, the “Spaceman,” and his regular journeys to Saturn. The forging of that network of support and trust was crucial to Taylor’s recovery, offering a respite from the “stranded, homeless feelings” she and others found in the outside world. A vivid picture of mental health treatment at a moment of epochal change, The Last Asylum is also a moving meditation on Taylor’s own experience, as well as that of millions of others who struggle with mental illness.

The Anatomy of Madness

Essays in the History of Psychiatry

Author: William F. Bynum,Roy Porter,Michael Shepherd

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9780415323857

Category: Psychiatric hospitals

Page: 368

View: 4176

Madness at Home

The Psychiatrist, the Patient, and the Family in England, 1820-1860

Author: Akihito Suzuki

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520245806

Category: History

Page: 259

View: 5352

This provocatively argued study, paints a fascinating picture of how families viewed and managed madness, suggesting that the family actually played a critical role in caring for the insane and in the development of psychiatry itself.

Ten Days in a Mad-House

Author: Nellie Bly

Publisher: Andrews UK Limited

ISBN: 1849895317

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 86

View: 1979

This is the true story of reporter Nellie Bly, who pretends to be insane, and manages to get herself committed into an insane asylum in the USA. This revised second digital edition is a fascinating account, specially formatted for today's e-readers by Andrews UK.

Houses of Madness

Insanity and Asylums of Bengal in Nineteenth-Century India

Author: Debjani Das (Assistant professor of history),Debjani Das, (As

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199458875

Category: Insanity (Law)

Page: 304

View: 4353

'Houses of Madness' is a history of asylums of colonial Bengal in the 19th century. It explores these institutions through several phases that not only involved changes in medical treatment and its interpretation, but also the question of spatial distribution within these institutions.

Madness in Australia

Histories, Heritage and the Asylum

Author: Catharine Coleborne

Publisher: Univ. of Queensland Press

ISBN: 9780702234064

Category: History

Page: 269

View: 8324

Covering the mid-nineteenth to the late twentieth century, the essays discuss the history of the asylum system in different colonies, patient histories, cultures of work, gender and race within the asylum , spatial constructions of madness, recreations and therapies, archives and museum displays, medical records, and much more.

Institutionalizing the Insane in Nineteenth-Century England

Author: Anna Shepherd

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317319060

Category: Medical

Page: 240

View: 2818

The nineteenth century brought an increased awareness of mental disorder, epitomized in the Asylum Acts of 1808 and 1845. Shepherd looks at two very different institutions to provide a nuanced account of the nineteenth-century mental health system.