Insanity and the Lunatic Asylum in the Nineteenth Century

Author: Serena Trowbridge

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317318552

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 7461

The nineteenth-century asylum was the scene of both terrible abuses and significant advancements in treatment and care. The essays in this collection look at the asylum from the perspective of the place itself – its architecture, funding and purpose – and at the experience of those who were sent there.

Committed to the State Asylum

Insanity and Society in Nineteenth-century Quebec and Ontario

Author: James E. Moran

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780773521896

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 9777

Committed to the State Asylum examines the evolution of the asylum as the response to insanity in nineteenth-century Quebec and Ontario. Focusing on the creation and development of government-funded asylums for the insane - among the largest and most important nineteenth-century institutions in both provinces - James Moran argues that asylum development was the result of complex relationships among a wide array of people, including state inspectors and administrators, asylum doctors, local magistrates, jail surgeons, religious authorities, and the relatives and neighbours of those who were considered to be insane. Unlike other studies, Committed to the State Asylum shows the important role that the community played in shaping the asylum and tackles the thorny issue of state development, explaining how state asylums developed differently in each province. Moran considers Canada's pioneering institutional efforts at dealing with the criminally insane and why those efforts lasted only a short time, shedding new light on the debate about the nature and extent of state involvement in nineteenth-century Canadian society. Committed to the State Asylum offers new insights into the ways in which both ordinary families and the state understood and responded to those they thought had crossed the boundaries of sane behaviour.

Prisons, Asylums, and the Public

Institutional Visiting in the Nineteenth Century

Author: Janet Miron

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 0802095135

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 2394

The prisons and asylums of Canada and the United States were a popular destination for institutional tourists in the nineteenth-century. Thousands of visitors entered their walls, recording and describing the interiors, inmates, and therapeutic and reformative practices they encountered in letters, diaries, and articles. Surprisingly, the vast majority of these visitors were not members of the medical or legal elite but were ordinary people. Prisons, Asylums, and the Public argues that, rather than existing in isolation, these institutions were closely connected to the communities beyond their walls. Challenging traditional interpretations of public visiting, Janet Miron examines the implications and imperatives of visiting from the perspectives of officials, the public, and the institutionalized. Finding that institutions could be important centres of civic activity, self-edification, and 'scientific' study, Prisons, Asylums, and the Public sheds new light on popular nineteenth-century attitudes towards the insane and the criminal.

The Cost of Insanity in Nineteenth-Century Ireland

Public, Voluntary and Private Asylum Care

Author: Alice Mauger

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319652443

Category: History

Page: 281

View: 4894

This open access book is the first comparative study of public, voluntary and private asylums in nineteenth-century Ireland. Examining nine institutions, it explores whether concepts of social class and status and the emergence of a strong middle class informed interactions between gender, religion, identity and insanity. It questions whether medical and lay explanations of mental illness and its causes, and patient experiences, were influenced by these concepts. The strong emphasis on land and its interconnectedness with notions of class identity and respectability in Ireland lends a particularly interesting dimension. The book interrogates the popular notion that relatives were routinely locked away to be deprived of land or inheritance, querying how often “land grabbing” Irish families really abused the asylum system for their personal economic gain. The book will be of interest to scholars of nineteenth-century Ireland and the history of psychiatry and medicine in Britain and Ireland.

Theaters of Madness

Insane Asylums and Nineteenth-Century American Culture

Author: Benjamin Reiss

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226709655

Category: Psychology

Page: 240

View: 301

In the mid-1800s, a utopian movement to rehabilitate the insane resulted in a wave of publicly funded asylums—many of which became unexpected centers of cultural activity. Housed in magnificent structures with lush grounds, patients participated in theatrical programs, debating societies, literary journals, schools, and religious services. Theaters of Madness explores both the culture these rich offerings fomented and the asylum’s place in the fabric of nineteenth-century life, reanimating a time when the treatment of the insane was a central topic in debates over democracy, freedom, and modernity. Benjamin Reiss explores the creative lives of patients and the cultural demands of their doctors. Their frequently clashing views turned practically all of American culture—from blackface minstrel shows to the works of William Shakespeare—into a battlefield in the war on insanity. Reiss also shows how asylums touched the lives and shaped the writing of key figures, such as Emerson and Poe, who viewed the system alternately as the fulfillment of a democratic ideal and as a kind of medical enslavement. Without neglecting this troubling contradiction, Theaters of Madness prompts us to reflect on what our society can learn from a generation that urgently and creatively tried to solve the problem of mental illness.

The Politics of Madness

The State, Insanity and Society in England, 1845–1914

Author: Joseph Melling,Bill Forsythe

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134417101

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 8505

The discovery and treatment of insanity remains one of the most debated and discussed issues in social history. Focusing on the second half of the nineteenth century, The Politics of Madness provides a new perspective on this important topic, based on research drawn from both local and national material. Within a social and cultural history of the English political and class order, it presents a fresh appraisal of the significance of the asylum in the decades following the creation of a national asylum system in 1845. Arguing that the new asylums provided a meeting place for different social interests and aspirations, the text asserts that this then marked a transition in provincial power relations from the landed interests to the new coalition of professional, commercial and populist groups, which gained control of the public asylums at the end of the period surveyed.

A Space of Their Own: The Archaeology of Nineteenth Century Lunatic Asylums in Britain, South Australia and Tasmania

Author: Susan Piddock

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 0387733868

Category: Medical

Page: 265

View: 9821

Employing the considerable archaeological and historical skills in her armory, Susan Piddock tries to lift the lid on the lunatic asylums of years gone by. Films and television programs have portrayed them as places of horror where the patients are restrained and left to listen to the cries of their fellow inmates in despair. But what was the world of nineteenth century lunatic asylums really like? Are these images true, or are we laboring under a misunderstanding?

Madness in Australia

Histories, Heritage and the Asylum

Author: Catharine Coleborne

Publisher: Univ. of Queensland Press

ISBN: 9780702234064

Category: History

Page: 269

View: 6693

Covering the mid-nineteenth to the late twentieth century, the essays discuss the history of the asylum system in different colonies, patient histories, cultures of work, gender and race within the asylum , spatial constructions of madness, recreations and therapies, archives and museum displays, medical records, and much more.

Gender and Medicine in Ireland 1700-1950

Author: Margaret Preston

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 0815651961

Category: History

Page: 317

View: 6659

The essays in this collection examine the intersections between gender, medicine, and conventional economic, political, and social histories in Ireland between 1700 and 1950. Gathering many of the top voices in Irish studies and the history of medicine, the editors cover a range of top­ics including midwifery, mental health, alcoholism, and infant mortality. Composed of thirteen chapters, the volume includes James Kelly’s original analyses of eighteenth-century dental practice and midwifery, placing the Irish experience in an international context. Greta Jones, in an exploration of a disease that affected thousands in Ireland, explains the reasons for higher tuberculosis mortality among women. Several es­says call attention to the attempted containment of disease, exploring the role of asylums and the gendered attitudes toward insanity and reform. Contributors highlight the often neglected impact of nurses and midwives, occupations traditionally dominated by women. Presenting a social history of Irish medicine, the disparate essays are united by several common themes: the inherent danger of life in eigh­teenth- and nineteenth-century Ireland, the specific brutality of women’s lives at the time, and the heroics of several enlightened figures.

The Confinement of the Insane

International Perspectives, 1800–1965

Author: Roy Porter,David Wright

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139439626

Category: Medical

Page: N.A

View: 1769

The rise of the asylum constitutes one of the most profound, and controversial, events in the history of medicine. Academics around the world have begun to direct their attention to the origins of the confinement of those deemed 'insane', exploring patient records in an attempt to understand the rise of the asylum within the wider context of social and economic change of nations undergoing modernisation. Originally published in 2003, this edited volume brings together thirteen original research papers to answer key questions in the history of asylums. What forces led to the emergence of mental hospitals in different national contexts? To what extent did patient populations vary in terms of their psychiatric profile and socio-economic background? What was the role of families, communities and the medical profession in the confinement process? This volume therefore represents a landmark study in the history of psychiatry by examining asylum confinement in a global context.

Mental Illness and Learning Disability since 1850

Finding a Place for Mental Disorder in the United Kingdom

Author: Pamela Dale,Joseph Melling

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134218168

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 2810

Taking forward the debate on the role and power of institutions for treating and incarcerating the insane, this volume challenges recent scholarship and focuses on a wide range of factors impacting on the care and confinement of the insane since 1850, including such things as the community, Poor Law authorities, local government and the voluntary sector. Questioning the notion that institutions were generally ‘benign’ and responsive to the needs of households, this work also emphasizes the important role of the diversity of interests in shaping institutional facilities. A fresh, stimulating step forward in the history of institutional care, Mental Illness and Learning Disability since 1850 is undoubtedly an important resource for student and scholar alike.

Lunatics, Imbeciles and Idiots

A History of Insanity in Nineteenth-Century Britain and Ireland

Author: Kathryn Burtinshaw,John R F Burt

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 1473879051

Category: Medical

Page: 248

View: 5879

In the first half of the nineteenth century, treatment of the mentally ill in Britain and Ireland underwent radical change. No longer manacled, chained and treated like wild animals, patient care was defined in law and medical understanding, and treatment of insanity developed. Focusing on selected cases, this new study enables the reader to understand how progressively advancing attitudes and expectations affected decisions, leading to better legislation and medical practice throughout the century. Specific mental health conditions are discussed in detail and the treatments patients received are analysed in an expert way. A clear view of why institutional asylums were established, their ethos for the treatment of patients, and how they were run as palaces rather than prisons giving moral therapy to those affected becomes apparent. The changing ways in which patients were treated, and altered societal views to the incarceration of the mentally ill, are explored. The book is thoroughly illustrated and contains images of patients and asylum staff never previously published, as well as first-hand accounts of life in a nineteenth-century asylum from a patients perspective. Written for genealogists as well as historians, this book contains clear information concerning access to asylum records and other relevant primary sources and how to interpret their contents in a meaningful way.

Irish Insanity

1800–2000

Author: Damien Brennan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136237070

Category: History

Page: 172

View: 1922

The national public asylum system in Ireland was established during the early nineteenth century and continued to operate up to the close of the twentieth century. These asylums / mental hospitals were a significant physical and social feature of Irish communities. They were used intensively and provided a convenient form of institutional intervention to manage a host of social problems. Irish Insanity identifies the long-term trends in institutional residency through the development of a detailed empirical data set, based on an analysis of original copies of the reports of Inspector of Asylums/Mental Hospitals in Ireland. Damien Brennan explores core social and historical features linked to this data including: the political context governance and social policy the relationship between church and state changing economic structures and social deprivation professionalization legislation and systems of admission and discharge categorisation and diagnostic criteria international developments family dynamics This book demonstrates that the actual rate of asylum utilisation in Ireland was the highest by international standards, but challenges the idea that an "epidemic of Irish insanity" actually existed. Offering a historical and sociological insight into an institutional legacy that is unusual within the international context, this book will be of particular relevance and interest to scholars within the fields of sociology, criminology, law, history, Irish studies, social policy, anthropology, nursing and medicine.

Armut und Wahnsinn

"Arme Irre" und ihre Familien im Spannungsfeld von Psychiatrie und Armenfürsorge in Glasgow, 1875-1921

Author: Jens Gründler

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 3486729748

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 2492

In Großbritannien errichteten und finanzierten die Verwaltungen der Armenfürsorge seit dem mittleren 19. Jahrhundert große psychiatrische Institutionen. Die Geschichte der Patientinnen und Patienten dieser Anstalten ist für den schottischen Fall bisher weitgehend vernachlässigt worden. Jens Gründler verfolgt in seinem Buch die Lebenswege von Insassen und deren Familien vor, während und nach der stationären Aufnahme in eine Anstalt der Glasgower Armenfürsorge, um den Einfluss dieser Akteure auf das System der Armenpsychiatrie nachzuzeichnen. Dafür greift er auf Kranken- und Armenakten der Betroffenen zurück und kann so nachweisen, dass die Funktion und Nutzung der Einrichtungen in der Praxis weniger von Medizinern und Bürokraten, sondern maßgeblich von den Angehörigen der Erkrankten geprägt wurde.

Social change and everyday life in Ireland, 1850-1922

Author: Caitriona Clear

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 1847796656

Category: History

Page: 206

View: 8842

Men and women who were born, grew up and died in Ireland between 1850 and 1922 made decisions - to train, to emigrate, to stay at home, to marry, to stay single, to stay at school - based on the knowledge and resources they had at the time. This, the first comprehensive social history of Ireland for the years 1850-1922 to appear since 1981, tries to understand that knowledge and to discuss those resources, for men and women at all social levels on the island as a whole. Original research, particularly on extreme poverty and public health, is supplemented by neglected published sources - local history journals, popular autobiography, newspapers. Folklore and Irish language sources are used extensively. All recent scholarly books in Irish social history are, of course, referred to throughout the book, but it is a lively read, reproducing the voices of the people and the stories of individuals whenever it can, questioning much of the accepted wisdom of Irish historiography over the past five decades. Statistics are used from time to time for illustrative purposes, but tables and graphs are consigned to the appendix at the back. There are some illustrations. An idea summary for the student, loaded with prompts for future research, this book is written in a non-cliched, jargon-free style aimed at the general reader.

Lunatic Asylums in Colonial Bombay

Shackled Bodies, Unchained Minds

Author: Sarah Ann Pinto

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319942441

Category: History

Page: 242

View: 8569

This book traces the historical roots of the problems in India’s mental health care system. It accounts for indigenous experiences of the lunatic asylum in the Bombay Presidency (1793-1921). The book argues that the colonial lunatic asylum failed to assimilate into Indian society and therefore remained a failed colonial-medical enterprise. It begins by assessing the implications of lunatic asylums on indigenous knowledge and healing traditions. It then examines the lunatic asylum as a ‘middle-ground’, and the European superintendents’ ‘common-sense’ treatment of Indian insanity. Furthermore, it analyses the soundscapes of Bombay’s asylums, and the extent to which public perceptions influenced their use. Lunatic asylums left a legacy of historical trauma for the indigenous community because of their coercive and custodial character. This book aims to disrupt that legacy of trauma and to enable new narratives in mental health treatment in India.

The Architecture of Madness

Insane Asylums in the United States

Author: Carla Yanni

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 9780816649396

Category: Medical

Page: 191

View: 5238

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Madness and the Mad in Russian Culture

Author: Angela Brintlinger,Ilya Vinitsky

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 0802091407

Category: History

Page: 331

View: 6519

Editors Angela Brintlinger and Ilya Vinitsky have brought together essays that cover over 250 years and address a wide variety of ideas related to madness

The discovery of the asylum

Social Order and Disorder in the New Republic

Author: David J. Rothman

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN: 9780202365534

Category: Psychology

Page: 376

View: 5827

This text poses the question why Americans, beginning in the 1820s and 1830s, simultaneously and confidently constructed prisons, insane asylums, reformatories and almshouses to confine and treat their deviant and dependent population. In his introduction, Rothman examines the reasons that this question is now one of the core concerns of European and American social history; analyzes the many imaginative answers that have been proposed; and evaluates their strengths and weaknesses.

Madness at Home

The Psychiatrist, the Patient, and the Family in England, 1820-1860

Author: Akihito Suzuki

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520245806

Category: History

Page: 259

View: 6946

This provocatively argued study, paints a fascinating picture of how families viewed and managed madness, suggesting that the family actually played a critical role in caring for the insane and in the development of psychiatry itself.