General Catalogue of Printed Books

Photolithographic Edition to 1955

Author: British Museum. Dept. of Printed Books

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: English imprints

Page: N.A

View: 4822

The Waterloo Roll Call

Author: Charles Dalton

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Waterloo, Battle of, Waterloo, Belgium, 1815

Page: 256

View: 8840

The Christmas Doll

Author: Elvira Woodruff

Publisher: Scholastic Inc.

ISBN: 9780590318792

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 160

View: 1857

As Christmas approaches, Lucy, a ten-year-old orphan living on the streets of London, is overjoyed to be given the job of sewing hearts for the dolls in ThimbleBee's Doll Shop.

The Outcasts of Time

Author: Ian Mortimer

Publisher: Pegasus Books

ISBN: 1681776898

Category: Fiction

Page: 400

View: 3900

From the author described by the London Times as "the most remarkable historian of our time” comes a stunning, high-concept time-travel adventure that is perfect for fans of S. J. Parris and Kate Mosse. December 1348. What if you had just six days to save your soul? With the country in the grip of the Black Death, brothers John and William fear that they will shortly die and suffer in the afterlife. But as the end draws near, they are given an unexpected choice: either to go home and spend their last six days in their familiar world, or to search for salvation across the forthcoming centuries – living each one of their remaining days ninety-nine years after the last. John and William choose the future and find themselves in 1447, ignorant of almost everything going on around them. The year 1546 brings no more comfort, and 1645 challenges them in further unexpected ways. It is not just that technology is changing: things they have taken for granted all their lives prove to be short-lived. As they find themselves in stranger and stranger times, the reader travels with them, seeing the world through their eyes as it shifts through disease, progress, enlightenment, and war. But their time is running out—can they do something to redeem themselves before the six days are up?

The History of Signboards

From the Earliest Times to the Present Day

Author: Jacob Larwood,John Camden Hotten

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Signs and signboards

Page: 536

View: 390

Purefinder

Author: Ben Gwalchmai

Publisher: John Hunt Publishing

ISBN: 1782790977

Category: Fiction

Page: 236

View: 3503

London, 1858: a child is dead, a man is blamed, and dragged through hell - why is he persecuted and who is his persecutor? Purefinder is a Gothic-horror historical thriller with a metaphysical edge; a circadian, Dantean exploration of London, loss, and fraternity; mystery, blood, mud, and guts combined; Rabelaisian relief; human tragedy; and the important questions at the heart of any time.

Cultivating Political and Public Identity

Why Plumage Matters

Author: Rodney Barker

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1526114585

Category: Political Science

Page: 260

View: 7046

Throughout the twentieth century, everyone from Marxists to economic individualists assumed that social and political activity was driven by the rational pursuit of material gain. Today, the fundamental importance of the cultivation and preservation of identity is finally re-emerging. In this book, Rodney Barker explores the rich fabric of speech, dress, diet and the built environment from which human identity is made. The colour of a scarf or the accent of a conversation can unite people or divide them, and the smallest detail can play its part in signalling who are allies and who are enemies. Identity simultaneously generates equality and inequality - it is both the engine of public life and the cause of its confusion and conflict - and a better understanding of its subtleties is crucial if we are to confront the tensions that it produces in society. Synthesising methods and ideas from numerous disciplines - including history, political science, anthropology, law and sociology - Barker presents a picture of human life as more than just a collection of material interests. His ultimate aim is to show that no human activity is trivial or meaningless, that everything counts and plumage matters.

A CHILD OF THE JAGO (Modern Classics Series)

A Tale from the Old London Slum

Author: Arthur Morrison

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN: 8026853601

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 3135

This carefully crafted ebook: äóìA CHILD OF THE JAGO (Modern Classics Series)äó� is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. A Child of the Jago recounts the brief life of Dicky Perrott, a child growing up in the "Old Jago", a fictionalization of the Old Nichol, a slum located between Shoreditch High Street and Bethnal Green Road in the East End of London. The Jago is a London slum where crime and violence are the only way of life, and from which there is no escape for the inhabitants. At the start of the novel Dicky Perrott is about 8 years old, undernourished and roaming the streets, forced to do whatever it takes in order to survive. Dickyäó»s affectionate nature and willingness to work provides a glimmer of hope that he can escape from the corruption of the Jago, but this hope is cynically thwarted by the avaricious Weech. The criminalizing of innocence in an environment of poverty and crime echoes the predicament of Oliver Twist. Arthur Morrison (1863-1945) was an English writer and journalist known for his realistic novels and stories about working-class life in London's East End, A Child of the Jago being the best known. Morrison is also known for his detective stories, featuring the detective Martin Hewitt, low-key, realistic, lower class answer to Sherlock Holmes. Martin Hewitt stories are similar in style to those of Conan Doyle, cleverly plotted and very amusing, while the character himself is a bit less arrogant and a bit more charming than Holmes.

A Shilling for a Wife

Author: Emma Hornby

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1473541689

Category: Fiction

Page: 448

View: 1844

The bestselling debut saga novel of 2017. Powerful, absorbing storytelling that fans of sagas by Dilly Court, Rosie Goodwin and Maggie Hope will adore. +++++ Sally Swann thought life couldn't get much worse. Then a single coin changed hands. A dismal cottage in the heart of Bolton, Lancashire, has been Sally’s prison since Joseph Goden 'bought' her from the workhouse as his wife. A drunkard and bully, Joseph rules her with a rod of iron, using fists and threats to keep her in check. When Sally gives birth, however, she knows she must do anything to save her child from her husband's clutches. She manages to escape, and taking her baby, flees for the belching chimneys of Manchester, in search of her only relative. But with the threat of discovery by Joseph, who will stop at nothing to find her, Sally must fight with every ounce of strength she has to protect herself and her son, and finally be with the man who truly loves her. For a fresh start does not come without a price . . .

Dissecting the Criminal Corpse

Staging Post-Execution Punishment in Early Modern England

Author: Elizabeth T. Hurren

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137582499

Category: History

Page: 326

View: 5179

Those convicted of homicide were hanged on the public gallows before being dissected under the Murder Act in Georgian England. Yet, from 1752, whether criminals actually died on the hanging tree or in the dissection room remained a medical mystery in early modern society. Dissecting the Criminal Corpse takes issue with the historical cliché of corpses dangling from the hangman’s rope in crime studies. Some convicted murderers did survive execution in early modern England. Establishing medical death in the heart-lungs-brain was a physical enigma. Criminals had large bull-necks, strong willpowers, and hearty survival instincts. Extreme hypothermia often disguised coma in a prisoner hanged in the winter cold. The youngest and fittest were capable of reviving on the dissection table. Many died under the lancet. Capital legislation disguised a complex medical choreography that surgeons staged. They broke the Hippocratic Oath by executing the Dangerous Dead across England from 1752 until 1832. This book is open access under a CC-BY license.

The Literature of Struggle

An Anthology of Chartist Fiction

Author: Ian Haywood

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351886606

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 2142

At its height, during the 1830s and 40s, Chartism inspired a prodigious literary output, based on its own newspapers and journals. While some Chartist political writings have been reprinted, the fiction of the movement has been largely neglected. Chartist stories represent a unique moment in literary history, when the radical political energies of a mass movement were fused with popular narrative forms. The result was a vital, accessible and popular fiction, informed by an awareness that Chartism had to forge its own brand of fiction in order to challenge the prevailing cultural misrepresentation of the working class and radical politics. This anthology is organised chronologically and includes a wide range of authors and genres, with complete poems and short stories as well as extracts from novels and other full-length works of fiction. The stories are divided into five areas which relect the range, scope and achievement of Chartism's intellectual and political imagination: the condition of England; Ireland; revolution; women and Chartism. The complete collection is set in an analytical framework and has a long historical introduction by the editor.

Women and the New Business Leadership

Author: Peninah Thomson,Tom Lloyd

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 0230271545

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 180

View: 5737

In 'The Woman's Place is in the Boardroom' the authors put the business case for more women on company boards. In the next book they explained how to acheive it. Here the authors discuss the role women directors can play in the reform of corporate governance systems following recent financial, crises in leadership, governance and the economy.

MOTOR ROUTES OF ENGLAND

Author: Gordon Cochrans 1878 Home

Publisher: Wentworth Press

ISBN: 9781363956869

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 1652

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Falling Upwards

How We Took to the Air

Author: Richard Holmes

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307908704

Category: Science

Page: 416

View: 1193

**Kirkus Best Books of the Year (2013)** **Time Magazine 10 Top Nonfiction Books of 2013** **The New Republic Best Books of 2013** In this heart-lifting chronicle, Richard Holmes, author of the best-selling The Age of Wonder, follows the pioneer generation of balloon aeronauts, the daring and enigmatic men and women who risked their lives to take to the air (or fall into the sky). Why they did it, what their contemporaries thought of them, and how their flights revealed the secrets of our planet is a compelling adventure that only Holmes could tell. His accounts of the early Anglo-French balloon rivalries, the crazy firework flights of the beautiful Sophie Blanchard, the long-distance voyages of the American entrepreneur John Wise and French photographer Felix Nadar are dramatic and exhilarating. Holmes documents as well the balloons used to observe the horrors of modern battle during the Civil War (including a flight taken by George Armstrong Custer); the legendary tale of at least sixty-seven manned balloons that escaped from Paris (the first successful civilian airlift in history) during the Prussian siege of 1870-71; the high-altitude exploits of James Glaisher (who rose) seven miles above the earth without oxygen, helping to establish the new science of meteorology); and how Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, and Jules Verne felt the imaginative impact of flight and allowed it to soar in their work. A seamless fusion of history, art, science, biography, and the metaphysics of flights, Falling Upwards explores the interplay between technology and imagination. And through the strange allure of these great balloonists, it offers a masterly portrait of human endeavor, recklessness, and vision. (With 24 pages of color illustrations, and black-and-white illustrations throughout.) From the Hardcover edition.

Bone Crossed

Author: Patricia Briggs

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1440698805

Category: Fiction

Page: 304

View: 1399

Welcome to Patricia Briggs’s world, a place where “witches, vampires, werewolves, and shape-shifters live beside ordinary people” (Booklist). It takes a very unusual woman to call it home—and there’s no one quite like Mercy Thompson. By day, Mercy Thompson is a car mechanic in the sprawling Tri-Cities of Eastern Washington. By night, she explores her preternatural side. As a shape-shifter with some unusual talents, Mercy’s found herself maintaining a tenuous harmony between the human and the not-so-human on more than one occasion. This time she may get more than she bargained for. Marsilia, the local vampire queen, has learned that Mercy crossed her by slaying a member of her clan—and she’s out for blood. But since Mercy is protected from direct reprisal by the werewolf pack (and her close relationship with its sexy Alpha), it won’t be Mercy’s blood Marsilia is after. It’ll be her friends’.

Devonshire Characters and Strange Events

Author: Sabine Baring-Gould

Publisher: Library of Alexandria

ISBN: 1465608443

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 5785

In 1763 Lord Bute, the Prime Minister, imposed a tax of 10s. per hogshead on cyder and perry, to be paid by the first buyer. The country gentlemen, without reference to party, were violent in their opposition, and Bute then condescended to reduce the sum and the mode of levying it, proposing 4s. per hogshead, to be paid, not by the first buyer, but by the grower, who was to be made liable to the regulations of the excise and the domiciliary visits of excisemen. Pitt thundered against this cyder Bill, inveighing against the intrusion of excise officers into private dwellings, quoting the old proud maxim, that every Englishman’s house was his castle, and showing the hardship of rendering every country gentleman, every individual that owned a few fruit trees and made a little cyder, liable to have his premises invaded by officers. The City of London petitioned the Commons, the Lords, the throne, against the Bill; in the House of Lords forty-nine peers divided against the Minister; the cities of Exeter and Worcester, the counties of Devonshire and Herefordshire, more nearly concerned in the question about cyder than the City of London, followed the example of the capital, and implored their representatives to resist the tax to the utmost; and an indignant and general threat was made that the apples should be suffered to fall and rot under the trees rather than be made into cyder, subject to such a duty and such annoyances. No fiscal question had raised such a tempest since Sir Robert Walpole’s Excise Bill in 1733. But Walpole, in the plenitude of his power and abilities, and with wondrous resources at command, was constrained to bow to the storm he had roused, and to shelve his scheme. Bute, on the other hand, with a power that lasted but a day, with a position already undermined, with slender abilities and no resources, but with Scotch stubbornness, was resolved that his Bill should pass. And it passed, with all its imperfections; and although there were different sorts of cyder, varying in price from 5s. to 50s. per hogshead, they were all taxed alike—the poor man having thus to pay as heavy a duty for his thin beverage as the affluent man paid for the choicest kind. The agitation against Lord Bute grew. In some rural districts he was burnt under the effigy of a jack-boot, a rustic allusion to his name (Bute); and on more than one occasion when he walked the streets he was accused of being surrounded by prize-fighters to protect him against the violence of the mob. Numerous squibs, caricatures, and pamphlets appeared. He was represented as hung on the gallows above a fire, in which a jack-boot fed the flames and a farmer was throwing an excised cyder-barrel into the conflagration, whilst a Scotchman, in Highland costume, in the background, commented, “It’s aw over with us now, and aw our aspiring hopes are gone”; whilst an English mob advanced waving the banners of Magna Charta, and “Liberty, Property, and No Excise.”