Kennedy's Wars

Berlin, Cuba, Laos, and Vietnam

Author: Lawrence Freedman

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195152433

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 6875

Focusing on the Cold War mindset of JFK, this unique portrait of his presidency introduces readers to the wars he inherited and started all over the world.

Vietnam War

The Essential Reference Guide

Author: James H. Willbanks

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1610691032

Category: History

Page: 341

View: 1899

The Vietnam War was one of America's longest, bloodiest, and most controversial wars. This volume examines the complexities of this protracted conflict and explains why the lessons learned in Vietnam are still highly relevant today. * More than 45 contributors, including Robert K. Brigham, Cecil B. Currey, Arnold R. Isaacs, Lewis Sorley, Spencer C. Tucker, and David T. Zabecki * Introductory essays provide a broad overview of the Vietnam War and help readers understand the causes and consequences of the conflict * Maps depicting South Vietnam, infiltration routes, and key battles

The Long War

A New History of U.S. National Security Policy Since World War II

Author: Andrew J. Bacevich

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231131582

Category: History

Page: 586

View: 3311

Essays by a diverse and distinguished group of historians, political scientists, and sociologists examine the alarms, emergencies, controversies, and confusions that have characterized America's Cold War, the post-Cold War interval of the 1990s, and today's "Global War on Terror." This "Long War" has left its imprint on virtually every aspect of American life; by considering it as a whole, The Long War is the first volume to take a truly comprehensive look at America's response to the national-security crisis touched off by the events of World War II. Contributors consider topics ranging from grand strategy and strategic bombing to ideology and economics and assess the changing American way of war and Hollywood's surprisingly consistent depiction of Americans at war. They evaluate the evolution of the national-security apparatus and the role of dissenters who viewed the myriad activities of that apparatus with dismay. They take a fresh look at the Long War's civic implications and its impact on civil-military relations. More than a military history, The Long War examines the ideas, policies, and institutions that have developed since the United States claimed the role of global superpower. This protracted crisis has become a seemingly permanent, if not defining aspect of contemporary American life. In breaking down the old and artificial boundaries that have traditionally divided the postwar period into neat historical units, this volume provides a better understanding of the evolution of the United States and U.S. policy since World War II and offers a fresh perspective on our current national security predicament.

Soviet-Vietnam Relations and the Role of China 1949-64

Changing Alliances

Author: Mari Olsen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134174128

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 5572

This new book analyzes how the Soviet leadership evaluated developments in Soviet-Vietnamese relations in the years from 1949 to 1964. Focusing on how Soviet leaders actually perceived China’s role in Vietnam relative to the Soviet role, it shows how these perceptions influenced the Soviet-Vietnamese relationship. It also explains how and when Moscow’s enthusiasm for the active Chinese role in Vietnam came to an end – or, in other words, from what point was Beijing’s involvement in Vietnam perceived as a liability rather than an asset, in the strategies of Soviet policy makers. This book is an excellent resource for all students with an interest in Soviet-Vietnamese relations and of strategic studies and international relations in general.

US Intervention Policy and Army Innovation

From Vietnam to Iraq

Author: Richard Lock-Pullan

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780714657196

Category: History

Page: 291

View: 2285

US Intervention Policy and Army Innovation examines how the US Army rebuilt itself after the Vietnam War and how this has affected US intervention policy, from the victory of the Gulf War to the failure of Somalia, the Bosnian and Kosovo interventions and the use of force post 9/11. Richard Lock-Pullan analyzes the changes in US military intervention strategy by examining two separate issues: the nature of the US Army as it rebuilt itself after the Vietnam War, and the attempts by the US to establish criteria for future military interventions. He first argues that US strategy traditionally relied upon national mobilization to co-ordinate political aims and military means; he subsequently analyzes how this changed to a formula of establishing militarily achievable political objectives prior to the use of force. Drawing on a vast body of material and on strategic culture and military innovation literature, Lock-Pullan demonstrates that the strategic lessons were a product of the rebuilding of the Army's identity as it became a professional all-volunteer force and that the Army's new doctrine developed a new 'way of war' for the nation, embodied in the AirLand Battle doctrine, which changed the approach to strategy. This book finally gives a practical analysis of how the interventions in Panama and the Gulf War vindicated this approach and brought a revived confidence in the use of force while more recent campaigns in Somalia, Kosovo and Bosnia exposed its weaknesses and the limiting nature of the Army's thinking. The legacy of the Army's innovation is examined in the new strategic environment post 9/11 with the operations in Afghanistan and Iraq.

So Much to Lose

John F. Kennedy and American Policy in Laos

Author: William J. Rust

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813144779

Category: Political Science

Page: 376

View: 2189

Before U.S. combat units were deployed to Vietnam, presidents Eisenhower and Kennedy strove to defeat a communist-led insurgency in Laos. This impoverished, landlocked Southeast Asian kingdom was geopolitically significant because it bordered more powerful communist and anticommunist nations. The Ho Chi Minh Trail, which traversed the country, was also a critical route for North Vietnamese infiltration into South Vietnam. In So Much to Lose: John F. Kennedy and American Policy in Laos, William J. Rust continues his definitive examination of U.S.-Lao relations during the Cold War, providing an extensive analysis of their impact on US policy decisions in Vietnam. He discusses the diplomacy, intelligence operations, and military actions that led to the Declaration on the Neutrality of Laos, signed in Geneva in 1962, which met President John F. Kennedy's immediate goal of preventing a communist victory in the country without committing American combat troops. Rust also examines the rapid breakdown of these accords, the U.S. administration's response to their collapse, and the consequences of that response. At the time of Kennedy's assassination in 1963, U.S. policy in Laos was confused and contradictory, and Lyndon B. Johnson inherited not only an incoherent strategy, but also military plans for taking the war to North Vietnam. By assessing the complex political landscape of Laos within the larger context of the Cold War, this book offers fresh insights into American foreign policy decisions that still resonate today.

Choosing War

The Lost Chance for Peace and the Escalation of War in Vietnam

Author: Fredrik Logevall

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520229193

Category: History

Page: 529

View: 1031

"Masterful. . . . Logevall presents a vivid and tragic portrait of the elements of U.S. decision-making on Vietnam from the beginning of the Kennedy administration through the announcement of the American ground war in July 1965. In the process he reveals a troubling picture of top officials in both the Kennedy and Johnson administrations persisting in efforts to boost the fortunes of sucessive governments of South Vietnam, even while they acknowledged that their chances for success were remote. In addition, he places the decision-making squarely in the international context."—Robert D. Schulzinger, author of A Time for War: The United States and Vietnam, 1941-1975 "Stunning in its research and highly sophisticated in its analysis, Choosing War is far and away the best study we have of Lyndon Johnson's escalation of the conflict in Vietnam."—George C. Herring "In this fine book, Fredrick Logevall offers the first detailed examination of why diplomacy failed to head off the Vietnam War. Grounding himself in documentary research and other sources from several countries, Logevall comes closer than anyone ever has to explaining what happened. His clear writing and deep analysis may well change our understanding of Vietnam as a quagmire."—John Prados, author of The Hidden History of the Vietnam War "A rising star among a new generation of historians, Fredrik Logevall has written the most important Vietnam book in years. By explaining the international context of that tragic conflict, Choosing War provides startling answers to the question, Why did the war happen? Controversial yet fair, this account challenges the reader to think through John F. Kennedy's and Lydon B. Johnson's individual responsibility for Vietnam. The effect is compelling, unforgettable history."—Timothy Naftali, co-author of "One Hell of a Gamble:" Khrushchev, Castro, and Kennedy, 1958-1964

Virtual JFK

Vietnam If Kennedy Had Lived

Author: James G. Blight,Janet M. Lang,David A. Welch

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742557000

Category: History

Page: 421

View: 9889

The Virtual JFK DVD is now available! For more information on the film companion to the book, visit http: //www.virtualjfk.com/ It Matters Who Is President Then and Now At the heart of this provocative book lies the fundamental question: Does it matter who is president on issues of war and peace? The Vietnam War was one of the most catastrophic and bloody in living memory, and its lessons take on resonance in light of America's current devastating involvement in Iraq. Tackling head-on the most controversial and debated "what if" in U.S. foreign policy, this unique work explores what President John F. Kennedy would have done in Vietnam if he had not been assassinated in 1963. Drawing on a wealth of recently declassified documents, frank oral testimony of White House officials from both the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, and the analysis of top historians, this book presents compelling evidence that JFK was ready to end U.S. involvement well before the conflict escalated. With vivid immediacy, readers will feel they are in the president's war room as the debates raged that forever changed the course of American history and continue to affect us profoundly today as the shadows of Vietnam stretch into Iraq."

The Universe Unraveling

American foreign policy in Cold War Laos

Author: Seth Jacobs

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 080146451X

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 1440

During the Eisenhower and Kennedy administrations, Laos was positioned to become a major front in the Cold War. Yet American policymakers ultimately chose to resist communism in neighboring South Vietnam instead. Two generations of historians have explained this decision by citing logistical considerations. Laos's landlocked, mountainous terrain, they hold, made the kingdom an unpropitious place to fight, while South Vietnam-possessing a long coastline, navigable rivers, and all-weather roads-better accommodated America's military forces. The Universe Unraveling is a provocative reinterpretation of U.S.-Laos relations in the years leading up to the Vietnam War. Seth Jacobs argues that Laos boasted several advantages over South Vietnam as a battlefield, notably its thousand-mile border with Thailand, whose leader was willing to allow Washington to use his nation as a base from which to attack the communist Pathet Lao. More significant in determining U.S. policy in Southeast Asia than strategic appraisals of the Laotian landscape were cultural perceptions of the Lao people. Jacobs contends that U.S. policy toward Laos under Eisenhower and Kennedy cannot be understood apart from the traits Americans ascribed to their Lao allies. Drawing on diplomatic correspondence and the work of iconic figures like "celebrity saint" Tom Dooley, Jacobs finds that the characteristics American statesmen and the American media attributed to the Lao-laziness, immaturity, and cowardice-differed from the traits assigned the South Vietnamese, making Lao chances of withstanding communist aggression appear dubious. The Universe Unraveling combines diplomatic, cultural, and military history to provide a new perspective on how prejudice can shape policy decisions and even the course of history.

American Tragedy

Kennedy, Johnson, and the Origins of the Vietnam War

Author: David E. Kaiser

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674006720

Category: History

Page: 566

View: 5543

Documents the origin of American involvement in the Vietnam War and how the policies in the Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson administrations led to war.

Reunification in West German Party Politics From Westbindung to Ostpolitik

Author: Joost Kleuters

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137283688

Category: Political Science

Page: 203

View: 9812

Combining new thinking in International Relations theory with original historical research, Kleuters explores the struggle between Christian Democrats and Social Democrats on the subject of German reunification, from Westbindung to Ostpolitik. The result is a gripping narrative focussing on theoretical relevance in foreign policy decisions-making.

The Future of War

A History

Author: Lawrence Freedman

Publisher: PublicAffairs

ISBN: 1610393066

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 7095

Questions about the future of war are a regular feature of political debate, strategic analysis, and popular fiction. Where should we look for new dangers? What cunning plans might an aggressor have in mind? What are the best forms of defense? How might peace be preserved or conflict resolved? From the French rout at Sedan in 1870 to the relentless contemporary insurgencies in Iraq and Afghanistan, Lawrence Freedman, a world-renowned military thinker, reveals how most claims from the military futurists are wrong. But they remain influential nonetheless. Freedman shows how those who have imagined future war have often had an idealized notion of it as confined, brief, and decisive, and have regularly taken insufficient account of the possibility of long wars-hence the stubborn persistence of the idea of a knockout blow, whether through a dashing land offensive, nuclear first strike, or cyberattack. He also notes the lack of attention paid to civil wars until the West began to intervene in them during the 1990s, and how the boundaries between peace and war, between the military, the civilian, and the criminal are becoming increasingly blurred. Freedman's account of a century and a half of warfare and the (often misconceived) thinking that precedes war is a challenge to hawks and doves alike, and puts current strategic thinking into a bracing historical perspective.

John F. Kennedy

The American Presidents Series: The 35th President, 1961-1963

Author: Alan Brinkley

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 1429974222

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 224

View: 1951

The young president who brought vigor and glamour to the White House while he confronted cold war crises abroad and calls for social change at home John Fitzgerald Kennedy was a new kind of president. He redefined how Americans came to see the nation's chief executive. He was forty-three when he was inaugurated in 1961—the youngest man ever elected to the office—and he personified what he called the "New Frontier" as the United States entered the 1960s. But as Alan Brinkley shows in this incisive and lively assessment, the reality of Kennedy's achievements was much more complex than the legend. His brief presidency encountered significant failures—among them the Bay of Pigs fiasco, which cast its shadow on nearly every national-security decision that followed. But Kennedy also had successes, among them the Cuban Missile Crisis and his belated but powerful stand against segregation. Kennedy seemed to live on a knife's edge, moving from one crisis to another—Cuba, Laos, Berlin, Vietnam, Mississippi, Georgia, and Alabama. His controversial public life mirrored his hidden private life. He took risks that would seem reckless and even foolhardy when they emerged from secrecy years later. Kennedy's life, and his violent and sudden death, reshaped our view of the presidency. Brinkley gives us a full picture of the man, his times, and his enduring legacy.

The Indochinese Experience of the French and the Americans

Nationalism and Communism in Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam

Author: Arthur J. Dommen

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253109255

Category: History

Page: 1192

View: 2306

"Dommen's book promises to be the definitive political history of Indochina during the Franco-American era." -- William M. Leary, E. Merton Coulter Professor of History, University of Georgia This magisterial study by Arthur J. Dommen sets the Indochina wars 'French and American' in perspective as no book that has come before. He summarizes the history of the peninsula from the Vietnamese War of Independence from China in 930-39 through the first French military actions in 1858, when the struggle of the peoples of Indochina with Western powers began. Dommen details the crucial episodes in the colonization of Indochina by the French and the indigenous reaction to it. The struggle for national sovereignty reached an acute state at the end of World War II, when independent governments rapidly assumed power in Vietnam and Cambodia. When the French returned, the struggle became one of open warfare, with Nationalists and Communists gripped in a contest for ascendancy in Vietnam, while the rulers of Cambodia and Laos sought to obtain independence by negotiation. The withdrawal of the French after their defeat at Dien Bien Phu brought the Indochinese face-to-face, whether as friends or as enemies, with the Americans. In spite of an armistice in 1954, the war between Hanoi and Saigon resumed as each enlisted the help of foreign allies, which led to the renewed loss of sovereignty as a result of alliances and an increasingly heavy loss of lives. Meticulous and detailed, Dommen's telling of this complicated story is always judicious. Nevertheless, many people will find his analysis of the Diem coup a disturbing account of American plotting and murder. This is an essential book for anyone who wants to understand Vietnam and the people who fought against the United States and won.

On the Front Lines of the Cold War

An American Correspondent's Journal from the Chinese Civil War to the Cuban Missile Crisis and Vietnam

Author: Seymour Topping

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 9780807137307

Category: History

Page: 488

View: 513

The well-known New York Times correspondent narrates his experiences reporting on some of major events and conflicts of the years following World War II and discusses his interviews with such political figures as Mao Tse Tung and Fidel Castro.

John F. Kennedy and the "Thousand Days"

New Perspectives on the Foreign and Domestic Policies of the Kennedy Administration

Author: Manfred Berg,Andreas Etges

Publisher: Universitaetsverlag Winter

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 303

View: 4412

Although it lasted only for a 'Thousand Days', the presidency of John F. Kennedy is considered a defining moment in recent American history. Despite countless attempts by historians, journalists and cultural critics, the Kennedy myth, carefully crafted during his lifetime and eagerly nurtured after his violent death, lives on. The enduring notion that America might have been spared many of the traumatic events of the 1960s and 1970s, if only John F. Kennedy had lived, poses a continuing challenge to historians to reassess his foreign and domestic policies. In this volume scholars from the United States, Germany and Great Britain, mostly representatives of a younger generation, take a fresh look at key topics such as Kennedy's policies toward Europe, the Third World, the civil rights struggle, and poverty. Contrary to his often grandiose rhetoric of vigorous leadership and "new frontiers" and despite his considerable skills at managing foreign and domestic crises, the essays emphasize that President John F. Kennedy acted largely within the consensus of Cold War liberalism.

JFK and Vietnam

Deception, Intrigue, and the Struggle for Power

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781530477937

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 6108

High Noon in the Cold War

Kennedy, Khrushchev, and the Cuban Missile Crisis

Author: Max Frankel

Publisher: Random House Digital, Inc.

ISBN: 0345466713

Category: History

Page: 206

View: 3862

An examination of the Cuban Missile Crisis analyzes the roles, objectives, and actions of John Kennedy and Nikita Khrushchev during the October 1962 showdown between the U.S. and Soviet Union.

The Color of Truth

McGeorge Bundy and William Bundy: Brothers in Arms

Author: Kai Bird

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501169165

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 9238

"Grey is the color of truth." So observed Mac Bundy in defending America's intervention in Vietnam. Kai Bird brilliantly captures this ambiguity in his revelatory look at Bundy and his brother William, two of the most influential policymakers of the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. It is a portrait of fiercely patriotic, brilliant and brazenly self-confident men who directed a steady escalation of a war they did not believe could be won. Bird draws on seven years of research, nearly one hundred interviews, and scores of still-classified top secret documents in a masterful reevaluation of America's actions throughout the Cold War and Vietnam.

Debating the Kennedy presidency

Author: James N. Giglio,Stephen G. Rabe

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Pub Inc

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 213

View: 9907

Debating the Kennedy Presidency examines the successes and failures of Kennedy's foreign and domestic policies. The differing viewpoints of the two authors, as well as the supplementary documents, allow readers to examine the issues and draw their own conclusions about America's 35th president.