L.A. City Limits

African American Los Angeles from the Great Depression to the Present

Author: Josh Sides

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520248309

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 2033

A lively history of modern black Los Angeles from the Great Depression to the present.

L.A. City Limits

African American Los Angeles from the Great Depression to the Present

Author: Josh Sides

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520939868

Category: History

Page: 302

View: 9030

In 1964 an Urban League survey ranked Los Angeles as the most desirable city for African Americans to live in. In 1965 the city burst into flames during one of the worst race riots in the nation's history. How the city came to such a pass—embodying both the best and worst of what urban America offered black migrants from the South—is the story told for the first time in this history of modern black Los Angeles. A clear-eyed and compelling look at black struggles for equality in L.A.'s neighborhoods, schools, and workplaces from the Great Depression to our day, L.A. City Limits critically refocuses the ongoing debate about the origins of America's racial and urban crisis. Challenging previous analysts' near-exclusive focus on northern "rust-belt" cities devastated by de-industrialization, Josh Sides asserts that the cities to which black southerners migrated profoundly affected how they fared. He shows how L.A.'s diverse racial composition, dispersive geography, and dynamic postwar economy often created opportunities—and limits—quite different from those encountered by blacks in the urban North.

L.A. City Limits

African American Los Angeles from the Great Depression to the Present

Author: Josh Sides

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520238411

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 3867

A lively history of modern black Los Angeles from the Great Depression to the present.

Black Los Angeles

American Dreams and Racial Realities

Author: Darnell M. Hunt,Ana-Christina Ramón

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814737358

Category: Social Science

Page: 439

View: 342

Naráyana’s best-seller gives its reader much more than “Friendly Advice.” In one handy collection—closely related to the world-famous Pañcatantra or Five Discourses on Worldly Wisdom —numerous animal fables are interwoven with human stories, all designed to instruct wayward princes. Tales of canny procuresses compete with those of cunning crows and tigers. An intrusive ass is simply thrashed by his master, but the meddlesome monkey ends up with his testicles crushed. One prince manages to enjoy himself with a merchant’s wife with her husband’s consent, while another is kicked out of paradise by a painted image. This volume also contains the compact version of King Víkrama’s Adventures, thirty-two popular tales about a generous emperor, told by thirty-two statuettes adorning his lion-throne. Co-published by New York University Press and the JJC Foundation For more on this title and other titles in the Clay Sanskrit series, please visit http://www.claysanskritlibrary.org

City Limits

Author: Terry Teachout

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0743246888

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 208

View: 7311

Bound for Freedom

Black Los Angeles in Jim Crow America

Author: Douglas Flamming

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520249909

Category: History

Page: 467

View: 7846

A definitive, illustrated account of Los Angeles's black community in the half century before World War I details African-American community life and political activism during the city's transformation from a small town to a sprawling metropolis. Reprint.

Changes of State

Nature and the Limits of the City in Early Modern Natural Law

Author: Annabel S. Brett

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400838622

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 3223

This is a book about the theory of the city or commonwealth, what would come to be called the state, in early modern natural law discourse. Annabel Brett takes a fresh approach by looking at this political entity from the perspective of its boundaries and those who crossed them. She begins with a classic debate from the Spanish sixteenth century over the political treatment of mendicants, showing how cosmopolitan ideals of porous boundaries could simultaneously justify the freedoms of itinerant beggars and the activities of European colonists in the Indies. She goes on to examine the boundaries of the state in multiple senses, including the fundamental barrier between human beings and animals and the limits of the state in the face of the natural lives of its subjects, as well as territorial frontiers. Drawing on a wide range of authors, Brett reveals how early modern political space was constructed from a complex dynamic of inclusion and exclusion. Throughout, she shows that early modern debates about political boundaries displayed unheralded creativity and virtuosity but were nevertheless vulnerable to innumerable paradoxes, contradictions, and loose ends. Changes of State is a major work of intellectual history that resonates with modern debates about globalization and the transformation of the nation-state.

Austin City Limits

A History

Author: Tracey E. W. Laird

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199812411

Category: Music

Page: 231

View: 3194

Traces the history of Austin City Limits, from its humble beginning as a weekly broadcast to the multi-faceted brand it has become.

Whitewashed Adobe

The Rise of Los Angeles and the Remaking of Its Mexican Past

Author: William Deverell

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520246675

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 4961

An absorbing narrative supported by a number of previously unpublished period photographs shows how a city that was once part of Mexico itself came of age through appropriating the region's connections to Mexican places and people. Reprint.

Black Arts West

Culture and Struggle in Postwar Los Angeles

Author: Daniel Widener

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822392623

Category: Social Science

Page: 383

View: 2873

From postwar efforts to end discrimination in the motion-picture industry, recording studios, and musicians’ unions, through the development of community-based arts organizations, to the creation of searing films critiquing conditions in the black working class neighborhoods of a city touting its multiculturalism—Black Arts West documents the social and political significance of African American arts activity in Los Angeles between the Second World War and the riots of 1992. Focusing on the lives and work of black writers, visual artists, musicians, and filmmakers, Daniel Widener tells how black cultural politics changed over time, and how altered political realities generated new forms of artistic and cultural expression. His narrative is filled with figures invested in the politics of black art and culture in postwar Los Angeles, including not only African American artists but also black nationalists, affluent liberal whites, elected officials, and federal bureaucrats. Along with the politicization of black culture, Widener explores the rise of a distinctive regional Black Arts Movement. Originating in the efforts of wartime cultural activists, the movement was rooted in the black working class and characterized by struggles for artistic autonomy and improved living and working conditions for local black artists. As new ideas concerning art, racial identity, and the institutional position of African American artists emerged, dozens of new collectives appeared, from the Watts Writers Workshop, to the Inner City Cultural Center, to the New Art Jazz Ensemble. Spread across generations of artists, the Black Arts Movement in Southern California was more than the artistic affiliate of the local civil-rights or black-power efforts: it was a social movement itself. Illuminating the fundamental connections between expressive culture and political struggle, Black Arts West is a major contribution to the histories of Los Angeles, black radicalism, and avant-garde art.

Race, Rights, and the Asian American Experience

Author: Angelo N. Ancheta

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813539021

Category: Law

Page: 207

View: 914

Demonstrates how United States civil rights laws have been framed by a black-white model of race that typically ignores the experiences of other groups, including Asian Americans. When racial discourse is limited to antagonisms between black and white, Asian Americans often find themselves in a racial limbo, marginalized or unrecognized as full participants. Ancheta examines legal and social theories of racial discrimination, ethnic differences in the Asian American population, nativism, citizenship, language, school desegregation and affirmative action. In this second edition, Ancheta also covers post-9/11 anti-Asian sentiment and racial profiling. --From publisher description.

Sunshine Was Never Enough

Los Angeles Workers, 1880–2010

Author: John H. M. Laslett

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520953878

Category: History

Page: 460

View: 2716

Delving beneath Southern California’s popular image as a sunny frontier of leisure and ease, this book tells the dynamic story of the life and labor of Los Angeles’s large working class. In a sweeping narrative that takes into account more than a century of labor history, John H. M. Laslett acknowledges the advantages Southern California’s climate, open spaces, and bucolic character offered to generations of newcomers. At the same time, he demonstrates that—in terms of wages, hours, and conditions of work—L.A. differed very little from America’s other industrial cities. Both fast-paced and sophisticated, Sunshine Was Never Enough shows how labor in all its guises—blue and white collar, industrial, agricultural, and high tech—shaped the neighborhoods, economic policies, racial attitudes, and class perceptions of the City of Angels. Laslett explains how, until the 1930s, many of L.A.’s workers were under the thumb of the Merchants and Manufacturers Association. This conservative organization kept wages low, suppressed trade unions, and made L.A. into the open shop capital of America. By contrast now, at a time when the AFL-CIO is at its lowest ebb—a young generation of Mexican and African American organizers has infused the L.A. movement with renewed strength. These stories of the men and women who pumped oil, loaded ships in San Pedro harbor, built movie sets, assembled aircraft, and in more recent times cleaned hotels and washed cars is a little-known but vital part of Los Angeles history.

LA Sports

Play, Games, and Community in the City of Angels

Author: Wayne Wilson,David K. Wiggins

Publisher: University of Arkansas Press

ISBN: 1610756290

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 376

View: 3511

LA Sports brings together sixteen essays covering various aspects of the development and changing nature of sport in one of America’s most fascinating and famous cities. The writers cover a range of topics, including the history of car racing and ice skating, the development of sport venues, the power of the Mexican fan base in American soccer leagues, the intersecting life stories of Jackie and Mack Robinson, the importance of the Showtime Lakers, the origins of Muscle Beach and surfing, sport in Hollywood films, and more.

Normal Life

Administrative Violence, Critical Trans Politics, and the Limits of Law

Author: Dean Spade

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 082237479X

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 4499

Revised and Expanded Edition Wait—what's wrong with rights? It is usually assumed that trans and gender nonconforming people should follow the civil rights and "equality" strategies of lesbian and gay rights organizations by agitating for legal reforms that would ostensibly guarantee nondiscrimination and equal protection under the law. This approach assumes that the best way to address the poverty and criminalization that plague trans populations is to gain legal recognition and inclusion in the state's institutions. But is this strategy effective? In Normal Life Dean Spade presents revelatory critiques of the legal equality framework for social change, and points to examples of transformative grassroots trans activism that is raising demands that go beyond traditional civil rights reforms. Spade explodes assumptions about what legal rights can do for marginalized populations, and describes transformative resistance processes and formations that address the root causes of harm and violence. In the new afterword to this revised and expanded edition, Spade notes the rapid mainstreaming of trans politics and finds that his predictions that gaining legal recognition will fail to benefit trans populations are coming to fruition. Spade examines recent efforts by the Obama administration and trans equality advocates to "pinkwash" state violence by articulating the US military and prison systems as sites for trans inclusion reforms. In the context of recent increased mainstream visibility of trans people and trans politics, Spade continues to advocate for the dismantling of systems of state violence that shorten the lives of trans people. Now more than ever, Normal Life is an urgent call for justice and trans liberation, and the radical transformations it will require.

The Great Black Way

L.A. in the 1940s and the Lost African-American Renaissance

Author: R. J. Smith

Publisher: Public Affairs

ISBN: 9781586485214

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 7375

This revelatory social history resurrects a forgotten place and time in African American and California history and discovers a scene as influential as the Harlem Renaissance—one which helped spawn, among other things, rhythm & blues and the civil rights movement

History and Its Limits

Human, Animal, Violence

Author: Dominick LaCapra

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801457688

Category: Philosophy

Page: 248

View: 4279

Dominick LaCapra's History and Its Limits articulates the relations among intellectual history, cultural history, and critical theory, examining the recent rise of "Practice Theory" and probing the limitations of prevalent forms of humanism. LaCapra focuses on the problem of understanding extreme cases, specifically events and experiences involving violence and victimization. He asks how historians treat and are simultaneously implicated in the traumatic processes they attempt to represent. In addressing these questions, he also investigates violence's impact on various types of writing and establishes a distinctive role for critical theory in the face of an insufficiently discriminating aesthetic of the sublime (often unreflectively amalgamated with the uncanny). In History and Its Limits, LaCapra inquires into the related phenomenon of a turn to the "postsecular," even the messianic or the miraculous, in recent theoretical discussions of extreme events by such prominent figures as Giorgio Agamben, Eric L. Santner, and Slavoj Zizek. In a related vein, he discusses Martin Heidegger's evocative, if not enchanting, understanding of "The Origin of the Work of Art." LaCapra subjects to critical scrutiny the sometimes internally divided way in which violence has been valorized in sacrificial, regenerative, or redemptive terms by a series of important modern intellectuals on both the far right and the far left, including Georges Sorel, the early Walter Benjamin, Georges Bataille, Frantz Fanon, and Ernst Jünger. Violence and victimization are prominent in the relation between the human and the animal. LaCapra questions prevalent anthropocentrism (evident even in theorists of the "posthuman") and the long-standing quest for a decisive criterion separating or dividing the human from the animal. LaCapra regards this attempt to fix the difference as misguided and potentially dangerous because it renders insufficiently problematic the manner in which humans treat other animals and interact with the environment. In raising the issue of desirable transformations in modernity, History and Its Limits examines the legitimacy of normative limits necessary for life in common and explores the disconcerting role of transgressive initiatives beyond limits (including limits blocking the recognition that humans are themselves animals).

Annual Report

Author: U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 4172