L.A. City Limits

African American Los Angeles from the Great Depression to the Present

Author: Josh Sides

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520248309

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 9372

A lively history of modern black Los Angeles from the Great Depression to the present.

Bridges of Reform

Interracial Civil Rights Activism in Twentieth-Century Los Angeles

Author: Shana Bernstein

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199779724

Category: Social Science

Page: 368

View: 6736

In her first book, Shana Bernstein reinterprets U.S. civil rights activism by looking at its roots in the interracial efforts of Mexican, African, Jewish, and Japanese Americans in mid-century Los Angeles. Expanding the frame of historical analysis beyond black/white and North/South, Bernstein reveals that meaningful domestic activism for racial equality persisted from the 1930s through the 1950s. She stresses how this coalition-building was facilitated by the cold war climate, as activists sought protection and legitimacy in this conservative era. Emphasizing the significant connections between ethno-racial communities and between the United States and world opinion, Bridges of Reform demonstrates the long-term role western cities like Los Angeles played in shaping American race relations.

A Companion to Los Angeles

Author: William Deverell,Greg Hise

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444390957

Category: History

Page: 536

View: 5453

This Companion contains 25 original essays by writers and scholars who present an expert assessment of the best and most important work to date on the complex history of Los Angeles. The first Companion providing a historical survey of Los Angeles, incorporating critical, multi-disciplinary themes and innovative scholarship Features essays from a range of disciplines, including history, political science, cultural studies, and geography Photo essays and ‘contemporary voice’ sections combine with traditional historiographic essays to provide a multi-dimensional view of this vibrant and diverse city Essays cover the key topics in the field within a thematic structure, including demography, social unrest, politics, popular culture, architecture, and urban studies

From Coveralls to Zoot Suits

The Lives of Mexican American Women on the World War II Home Front

Author: Elizabeth R. Escobedo

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469602067

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 6078

During World War II, unprecedented employment avenues opened up for women and minorities in U.S. defense industries at the same time that massive population shifts and the war challenged Americans to rethink notions of race. At this extraordinary historical moment, Mexican American women found new means to exercise control over their lives in the home, workplace, and nation. In From Coveralls to Zoot Suits, Elizabeth R. Escobedo explores how, as war workers and volunteers, dance hostesses and zoot suiters, respectable young ladies and rebellious daughters, these young women used wartime conditions to serve the United States in its time of need and to pursue their own desires. But even after the war, as Escobedo shows, Mexican American women had to continue challenging workplace inequities and confronting family and communal resistance to their broadening public presence. Highlighting seldom heard voices of the "Greatest Generation," Escobedo examines these contradictions within Mexican families and their communities, exploring the impact of youth culture, outside employment, and family relations on the lives of women whose home-front experiences and everyday life choices would fundamentally alter the history of a generation.

Chronicles of Old Los Angeles

Exploring the Devilish History of the City of the Angels

Author: James Roman

Publisher: Museyon

ISBN: 1938450760

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 6550

There's more to Los Angeles than lights, camera, action; discover the city yourself with six guided walking/driving tours of LA's historic neighborhoods, illustrated with color photographs and period maps. From the city's early days marked by missionaries, robber barons, orange groves, and oil wells to the invention of the movie camera, Chronicles of Old Los Angeles explains how the Wild West became the Left Coast, and how Alta California became the 31st state. Learn how ethnic waves built Los Angeles—from Native Americans to Spaniards, Latinos, Chinese, Japanese, and all the characters that crowded into California during the Gold Rush—and learn about the gangsters, surfers, architects, and Hollywood pioneers who brought fame to the City of the Angels.

La Mesa

Author: James D. Newland,La Mesa Historical Society

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 143962500X

Category: Photography

Page: 128

View: 9399

On February 16, 1912, La Mesa Springs, a community of 700 citrus farmers, home seekers, developers, and businessmen, incorporated into the City of La Mesa. Located amongst the rolling hills and mesa lands between San Diego and El Cajon, today’s suburban city of over 56,000 is still renown for its small-town character, featuring its historic “village” business district, family-friendly neighborhoods, good schools, and ample retail and recreational amenities. The area’s centuries-old prehistory and history can be traced to the natural springs that attracted stockman Robert Allison in 1869. Allison Springs, later renamed, prospered and grew after the arrival of the railroad in 1889. After incorporation, the young city grew steadily, reaching 3,925 residents by 1940. Post–World War II La Mesa exemplified the exponential suburban growth of the region, expanding to the north and west of the old downtown to accommodate 50,000-plus residents by 1980—all were attracted, as today, to the “Jewel of the Hills.”

Left in the Dust

How Race and Politics Created a Human and Environmental Tragedy in L.A.

Author: Karen Piper

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1466891688

Category: Nature

Page: 240

View: 398

An intensely personal story crossed with a political potboiler, Left in the Dust is a unique and passionate account of the city of Los Angeles's creation, cover-up and inadequate attempts to repair a major environmental catastrophe. Owens River, which once fed Owens Lake, was diverted away from the lake to supply the faucets and sprinklers of Los Angeles. The dry lakebed now contains a dust saturated with toxic heavy metals, which are blown from the lake and inhaled by unsuspecting citizens throughout the Midwest, causing major health issues. Karen Piper, one of the victims who grew up breathing that dust, reveals the shocking truth behind this tragedy and examines how waste and pollution are often neglected to encourage urban growth, while poor, non-white, and rural areas are forgotten or sacrificed.

More Miles Than Money

Journeys Through American Music

Author: Garth Cartwright

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 1847652980

Category: Music

Page: 380

View: 5105

Armed only with a Greyhound ticket and enough money for his next beer, Garth Cartwright set out to see whether the American roots music he loved - blues and country, folk and soul - was still alive in the twenty-first century. His journey took him from the LA bus station to the Mexican cantinas of San Antonio, the Indian reservations of New Mexico to the last surviving juke joints of Highway 61. Along the way he meets an exotic mix of surviving legends - from soul diva Mabel John to the queen of Mexican American song Lydia Mendoza, funk pioneer Charles Wright to country troubadour Billy Joe Shaver - plus a supporting cast of cowboy poets, down and out bluesmen and a feller called Lee who becomes Cartwright's co-pilot for an epic drive across the deserts of the South-West. A remarkable piece of travel writing and an introduction to the real stars of Americana.

Living for the City

Migration, Education, and the Rise of the Black Panther Party in Oakland, California

Author: Donna Jean Murch

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807895857

Category: Social Science

Page: 328

View: 6608

In this nuanced and groundbreaking history, Donna Murch argues that the Black Panther Party (BPP) started with a study group. Drawing on oral history and untapped archival sources, she explains how a relatively small city with a recent history of African American settlement produced such compelling and influential forms of Black Power politics. During an era of expansion and political struggle in California's system of public higher education, black southern migrants formed the BPP. In the early 1960s, attending Merritt College and other public universities radicalized Huey Newton, Bobby Seale, and many of the young people who joined the Panthers' rank and file. In the face of social crisis and police violence, the most disfranchised sectors of the East Bay's African American community--young, poor, and migrant--challenged the legitimacy of state authorities and of an older generation of black leadership. By excavating this hidden history, Living for the City broadens the scholarship of the Black Power movement by documenting the contributions of black students and youth who created new forms of organization, grassroots mobilization, and political literacy.

Ghettoside

A True Story of Murder in America

Author: Jill Leovy

Publisher: Spiegel & Grau

ISBN: 0385530005

Category: True Crime

Page: 384

View: 2984

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, USA TODAY, AND CHICAGO TRIBUNE • A masterly work of literary journalism about a senseless murder, a relentless detective, and the great plague of homicide in America NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review • The Washington Post • The Boston Globe • The Economist • The Globe and Mail • BookPage • Kirkus Reviews On a warm spring evening in South Los Angeles, a young man is shot and killed on a sidewalk minutes away from his home, one of the thousands of black Americans murdered that year. His assailant runs down the street, jumps into an SUV, and vanishes, hoping to join the scores of killers in American cities who are never arrested for their crimes. But as soon as the case is assigned to Detective John Skaggs, the odds shift. Here is the kaleidoscopic story of the quintessential, but mostly ignored, American murder—a “ghettoside” killing, one young black man slaying another—and a brilliant and driven cadre of detectives whose creed is to pursue justice for forgotten victims at all costs. Ghettoside is a fast-paced narrative of a devastating crime, an intimate portrait of detectives and a community bonded in tragedy, and a surprising new lens into the great subject of why murder happens in our cities—and how the epidemic of killings might yet be stopped. Praise for Ghettoside “A serious and kaleidoscopic achievement . . . [Jill Leovy is] a crisp writer with a crisp mind and the ability to boil entire skies of information into hard journalistic rain.”—Dwight Garner, The New York Times “Masterful . . . gritty reporting that matches the police work behind it.”—Los Angeles Times “Moving and engrossing.”—San Francisco Chronicle “Penetrating and heartbreaking . . . Ghettoside points out how relatively little America has cared even as recently as the last decade about the value of young black men’s lives.”—USA Today “Functions both as a snappy police procedural and—more significantly—as a searing indictment of legal neglect . . . Leovy’s powerful testimony demands respectful attention.”—The Boston Globe “Gritty, heart-wrenching . . . Everyone needs to read this book.”—Michael Connelly “Ghettoside is remarkable: a deep anatomy of lawlessness.”—Atul Gawande, author of Being Mortal “[Leovy writes] with grace and artistry, and controlled—but bone-deep—outrage in her new book. . . . The most important book about urban violence in a generation.”—The Washington Post “Riveting . . . This timely book could not be more important.”—Associated Press “Leovy’s relentless reporting has produced a book packed with valuable, hard-won insights—and it serves as a crucial, 366-page reminder that ‘black lives matter.’ ”—The New York Times Book Review “A compelling analysis of the factors behind the epidemic of black-on-black homicide . . . an important book, which deserves a wide audience.”—Hari Kunzru, The Guardian From the Hardcover edition.

Almighty God Created the Races

Christianity, Interracial Marriage, and American Law

Author: Fay Botham

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807899229

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 661

In this fascinating cultural history of interracial marriage and its legal regulation in the United States, Fay Botham argues that religion--specifically, Protestant and Catholic beliefs about marriage and race--had a significant effect on legal decisions concerning miscegenation and marriage in the century following the Civil War. She contends that the white southern Protestant notion that God "dispersed" the races and the American Catholic emphasis on human unity and common origins point to ways that religion influenced the course of litigation and illuminate the religious bases for Christian racist and antiracist movements.

City of Promise

Race & Historical Change in Los Angeles

Author: Mark M. Dodge,Martin Schiesl

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781930053427

Category: History

Page: 228

View: 7470

By the end of the 20th century, Los Angeles had become the biggest multicultural center in the nation boasting an extraordinary racial diversity. The authors of the essays in City of Promise, drawing upon a wide range of primary and secondary materials, provide a rich description and discussion of this monumental development. They show that nonwhite newcomers withstood much discrimination, formed a variety of cultural and social institutions, established permanent communities, and gained political power. The result is an addition to the understanding of the history of race and race relations in Los Angeles and the urban American West.

Material Dreams

Southern California through the 1920s

Author: Kevin Starr

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199923272

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 1379

Kevin Starr is the foremost chronicler of the California dream and indeed one of the finest narrative historians writing today on any subject. The first two installments of his monumental cultural history, "Americans and the California Dream," have been hailed as "mature, well-proportioned and marvelously diverse (and diverting)" (The New York Times Book Review) and "rich in details and alive with interesting, and sometimes incredible people" (Los Angeles Times). Now, in Material Dreams, Starr turns to one of the most vibrant decades in the Golden State's history, the 1920s, when some two million Americans migrated to California, the vast majority settling in or around Los Angeles. In a lively and eminently readable narrative, Starr reveals how Los Angeles arose almost defiantly on a site lacking many of the advantages required for urban development, creating itself out of sheer will, the Great Gatsby of American cities. He describes how William Ellsworth Smyth, the Peter the Hermit of the Irrigation Crusade, the self-educated, Irish engineer William Mulholland (who built the main aquaducts to Los Angeles), and George Chaffey (who diverted the Colorado River, transforming desert into the lush Imperial Valley) brought life-supporting water to the arid South. He examines the discovery of oil, the boosters and land developers, the evangelists (such as Bob Shuler, the Methodist Savanarola of Los Angeles, and Aimee Semple McPherson), and countless other colorful figures of the period. There are also fascinating sections on the city's architecture the impact of the automobile on city planning, the Hollywood film community, the L.A. literati, and much more. By the end of the decade, Los Angeles had tripled in population and become the fifth largest city in the nation. In Material Dreams, Starr captures this explosive growth in a narrative tour de force that combines wide-ranging scholarship with captivating prose.

Reimagining Indian Country

Native American Migration and Identity in Twentieth-Century Los Angeles

Author: Nicolas G. Rosenthal

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807869996

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 1304

For decades, most American Indians have lived in cities, not on reservations or in rural areas. Still, scholars, policymakers, and popular culture often regard Indians first as reservation peoples, living apart from non-Native Americans. In this book, Nicolas Rosenthal reorients our understanding of the experience of American Indians by tracing their migration to cities, exploring the formation of urban Indian communities, and delving into the shifting relationships between reservations and urban areas from the early twentieth century to the present. With a focus on Los Angeles, which by 1970 had more Native American inhabitants than any place outside the Navajo reservation, Reimagining Indian Country shows how cities have played a defining role in modern American Indian life and examines the evolution of Native American identity in recent decades. Rosenthal emphasizes the lived experiences of Native migrants in realms including education, labor, health, housing, and social and political activism to understand how they adapted to an urban environment, and to consider how they formed--and continue to form--new identities. Though still connected to the places where indigenous peoples have preserved their culture, Rosenthal argues that Indian identity must be understood as dynamic and fully enmeshed in modern global networks.

Sole Survivor

A Novel

Author: Dean Koontz

Publisher: Bantam

ISBN: 0307414191

Category: Fiction

Page: 416

View: 6635

BONUS: This edition contains an excerpt from Dean Koontz's The City. A catastrophic, unexplainable plane crash leaves three hundred and thirty dead -- no survivors. Among the victims are the wife and two daughters of Joe Carpenter, a Los Angeles Post crime reporter. A year after the crash, still gripped by an almost paralyzing grief, Joe encounters a woman named Rose, who claims to have survived the crash. She holds out the possibility of a secret that will bring Joe peace of mind. But before he can ask any questions, she slips away. Driven now by rage (have the authorities withheld information?) and a hope almost as unbearable as his grief (if there is one survivor, are there others?), Joe sets out to find the mysterious woman. His search immediately leads him into the path of a powerful and shadowy organization hell-bent on stopping Rose before she can reveal what she knows about the crash. Sole Survivor unfolds at a heart-stopping pace, as a desperate chase and a shattering emotional odyssey lead Joe to a truth that will force him to reassess everything he thought he knew about life and death -- a truth that, given the chance, will rock the world and redefine the destiny of humanity.

Soil Survey

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Soil surveys

Page: N.A

View: 7195

Los Angeles

Biography of a City

Author: John Walton Caughey,LaRee Caughey

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520034105

Category: Social Science

Page: 509

View: 582

"Its intelligent combination of essays reveals much about Los Angeles which does not always find its way into socio-historical texts about the area. The editors' remarks preceding each essay expertly bind the book together. I suspect it will wind up as one of the more dog-eared volumes on my shelf."--Mayor Tom Bradley of Los Angeles

Southern California: an Island on the Land

Author: Carey McWilliams

Publisher: Gibbs Smith

ISBN: 9780879050078

Category: Travel

Page: 387

View: 3652

Packed With Magnificent Material On Southern California's Galaxy of Person- Alities, This Book Provides Insights Into Subjects Ranging From The Origins Hollywood To The Flowering of Inter- National-Style Architecture. and It Does That By Looking At Personalities As Div- Erse As Helen Hunt Jackson To Aimee Semple McPherson, Huntington The Finan- Cier To Hatfield The Rainmaker.