Living the World War

A Weekly Exploration of the American Experience in World War I-Volume One

Author: Donald N. Zillman,Elizabeth Elsbach

Publisher: Vandeplas Pub.

ISBN: 9781600422782

Category:

Page: 596

View: 544

A century ago Americans entered and fought 'a war to end all wars.' In Living the World War: A Weekly Exploration of the American Experience in World War I we use the Congressional Record and the New York Times to see how an American citizen of that era would have experienced the World War without knowing what would come next. In addition to the War, Americans living during the weeks of October 1, 1916 to December 31, 1917 also debated women's suffrage, race relations, Prohibition, the rights of organized labor, reconciliation of North and South, and coal and fuel shortages. That experience of war, and the emerging national issues, profoundly shape America in the 21st century. Donald N. Zillman is the Edward Godfrey Professor of Law at the University of Maine School of Law. He majored in history at the University of Wisconsin and graduated from the Wisconsin (JD) and the Virginia Law Schools (LLM). In his career he served as an Army Judge Advocate officer and a professor of law at Arizona State University and the University of Utah before coming to Maine as the Dean of the University of Maine Law School. He also served as the President of the University of Maine at Presque Isle and as a visiting professor at the United States Military Academy at West Point and the University of Southampton (UK). His writings have focused on military law, energy law, and tort law. Elizabeth Elsbach received her JD from the University of Maine Law School in 2016. She majored in history, political science, and English at Saint Mary's College in South Bend, Indiana. During her time at Saint Mary's she lived abroad in Innsbruck, Austria where she immersed herself in the cultures, the languages, and the history of Europe. While in Law School, Elizabeth collaborated on an article on energy and natural resources for the Oxford University Press in addition to co-authoring Living the World War. She is pursuing a career in intellectual property law. The authors are law trained by profession and amateur historians by avocation. We bring the differing perspectives of men and women, military veteran and non-veteran, baby boom generation and millennial generation to our work. Join us in the experience of "Living the World War."

Living the World War

A Weekly Exploration of the American Experience in World War I-Volume Two

Author: Donald N. Zillman,Elizabeth Elsbach

Publisher: Vandeplas Pub.

ISBN: 9781600422959

Category: History

Page: 632

View: 3128

A century ago Americans entered and fought 'a war to end all wars.' In Living the World War: A Weekly Exploration of the American Experience in World War I we use the Congressional Record and the New York Times to see how an American citizen of that era would have experienced the World War without knowing what would come next. In addition to the War, Americans living during the weeks of October 1, 1916 to December 31, 1917 also debated women's suffrage, race relations, Prohibition, the rights of organized labor, reconciliation of North and South, and coal and fuel shortages. That experience of war, and the emerging national issues, profoundly shape America in the 21st century.

Into the Silence

The Great War, Mallory, and the Conquest of Everest

Author: Wade Davis

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307700569

Category: History

Page: 672

View: 7502

The definitive story of the British adventurers who survived the trenches of World War I and went on to risk their lives climbing Mount Everest. On June 6, 1924, two men set out from a camp perched at 23,000 feet on an ice ledge just below the lip of Everest’s North Col. George Mallory, thirty-seven, was Britain’s finest climber. Sandy Irvine was a twenty-two-year-old Oxford scholar with little previous mountaineering experience. Neither of them returned. Drawing on more than a decade of prodigious research, bestselling author and explorer Wade Davis vividly re-creates the heroic efforts of Mallory and his fellow climbers, setting their significant achievements in sweeping historical context: from Britain’s nineteen-century imperial ambitions to the war that shaped Mallory’s generation. Theirs was a country broken, and the Everest expeditions emerged as a powerful symbol of national redemption and hope. In Davis’s rich exploration, he creates a timeless portrait of these remarkable men and their extraordinary times.

Uncle Sam Wants You

World War I and the Making of the Modern American Citizen

Author: Christopher Capozzola

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199830967

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 1891

Based on a rich array of sources that capture the voices of both political leaders and ordinary Americans, Uncle Sam Wants You offers a vivid and provocative new interpretation of American political history, revealing how the tensions of mass mobilization during World War I led to a significant increase in power for the federal government. Christopher Capozzola shows how, when the war began, Americans at first mobilized society by stressing duty, obligation, and responsibility over rights and freedoms. But the heated temper of war quickly unleashed coercion on an unprecedented scale, making wartime America the scene of some of the nation's most serious political violence, including notorious episodes of outright mob violence. To solve this problem, Americans turned over increasing amounts of power to the federal government. In the end, whether they were some of the four million men drafted under the Selective Service Act or the tens of millions of home-front volunteers, Americans of the World War I era created a new American state, and new ways of being American citizens.

"Daddy's Gone to War"

The Second World War in the Lives of America's Children

Author: William M. Tuttle Jr.

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019987882X

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 8039

Looking out a second-story window of her family's quarters at the Pearl Harbor naval base on December 7, 1941, eleven-year-old Jackie Smith could see not only the Rising Sun insignias on the wings of attacking Japanese bombers, but the faces of the pilots inside. Most American children on the home front during the Second World War saw the enemy only in newsreels and the pages of Life Magazine, but from Pearl Harbor on, "the war"--with its blackouts, air raids, and government rationing--became a dramatic presence in all of their lives. Thirty million Americans relocated, 3,700,000 homemakers entered the labor force, sparking a national debate over working mothers and latchkey children, and millions of enlisted fathers and older brothers suddenly disappeared overseas or to far-off army bases. By the end of the war, 180,000 American children had lost their fathers. In "Daddy's Gone to War", William M. Tuttle, Jr., offers a fascinating and often poignant exploration of wartime America, and one of generation's odyssey from childhood to middle age. The voices of the home front children are vividly present in excerpts from the 2,500 letters Tuttle solicited from men and women across the country who are now in their fifties and sixties. From scrap-collection drives and Saturday matinees to the atomic bomb and V-J Day, here is the Second World War through the eyes of America's children. Women relive the frustration of always having to play nurses in neighborhood war games, and men remember being both afraid and eager to grow up and go to war themselves. (Not all were willing to wait. Tuttle tells of one twelve year old boy who strode into an Arizona recruiting office and declared, "I don't need my mother's consent...I'm a midget.") Former home front children recall as though it were yesterday the pain of saying good-bye, perhaps forever, to an enlisting father posted overseas and the sometimes equally unsettling experience of a long-absent father's return. A pioneering effort to reinvent the way we look at history and childhood, "Daddy's Gone to War" views the experiences of ordinary children through the lens of developmental psychology. Tuttle argues that the Second World War left an indelible imprint on the dreams and nightmares of an American generation, not only in childhood, but in adulthood as well. Drawing on his wide-ranging research, he makes the case that America's wartime belief in democracy and its rightful leadership of the Free World, as well as its assumptions about marriage and the family and the need to get ahead, remained largely unchallenged until the tumultuous years of the Kennedy assassination, Vietnam and Watergate. As the hopes and expectations of the home front children changed, so did their country's. In telling the story of a generation, Tuttle provides a vital missing piece of American cultural history.

Harlem Hellfighters

Author: Max Brooks

Publisher: Gerald Duckworth & Co

ISBN: 071565022X

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: 304

View: 763

In 1919, the 369th infantry regiment - the Harlem Hellfighters as the Germans called them - marched home triumphantly from World War I. They had spent more time in combat than any other American unit, never losing a foot of ground to the enemy and winning countless decorations. Though they returned home from the trenches of France as heroes, this overlooked that the African American unit faced tremendous discrimination, even from their own government. Based on true events and featuring artwork from acclaimed illustrator Caanan White, The Harlem Hellfighters delivers an action-packed and powerful story of how a group of exceptional individuals showed extraordinary courage, honour and heart in the face of terrible prejudice and in the midst of the unprecedented horrors of the Great War.

Africana

The Encyclopedia of the African and African American Experience

Author: Kwame Anthony Appiah,Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0195170555

Category: History

Page: 3960

View: 7851

Ninety years after W.E.B. Du Bois first articulated the need for "the equivalent of a black Encyclopedia Britannica," Kwame Anthony Appiah and Henry Louis Gates Jr., realized his vision by publishing Africana: The Encyclopedia of the African and African American Experience in 1999. This new, greatly expanded edition of the original work broadens the foundation provided by Africana. Including more than one million new words, Africana has been completely updated and revised. New entries on African kingdoms have been added, bibliographies now accompany most articles, and the encyclopedia's coverage of the African diaspora in Latin America and the Caribbean has been expanded, transforming the set into the most authoritative research and scholarly reference set on the African experience ever created. More than 4,000 articles cover prominent individuals, events, trends, places, political movements, art forms, business and trade, religion, ethnic groups, organizations and countries on both sides of the Atlantic. African American history and culture in the present-day United States receive a strong emphasis, but African American history and culture throughout the rest of the Americas and their origins in African itself have an equally strong presence. The articles that make up Africana cover subjects ranging from affirmative action to zydeco and span over four million years from the earlies-known hominids , to Sean "Diddy" Combs. With entries ranging from the African ethnic groups to members of the Congressional Black Caucus, Africana, Second Edition, conveys the history and scope of cultural expression of people of African descent with unprecedented depth.

If Billy Sunday Comes to Town - Delusion as a Religious Experience?

The Biography of Anton T. Boisen from the Perspective of Foundational Theology

Author: Cor Arends

Publisher: LIT Verlag Münster

ISBN: 3643904797

Category: Religion

Page: 265

View: 9665

This book explores how religious delusion can be acknowledged as a religious experience. In addition, the book presents a detailed case-study of the life of Presbyterian minister Anton T. Boisen (1876-1965), his crises and the religious delusion that brought him to the brink of the abyss after the trauma he experienced during World War I--Back cover.

Dream a World Anew

The African American Experience and the Shaping of America

Author: National Museum of African American History and Culture (U.S.)

Publisher: Smithsonian Institution

ISBN: 1588345688

Category: Art

Page: 287

View: 3697

"In association with the National Museum of African American History and Culture."

Thousand-Mile War

World War II in Alaska and the Aleutians

Author: Brian Garfield

Publisher: University of Alaska Press

ISBN: 1602231176

Category: History

Page: 479

View: 6669

The Thousand-Mile War, a powerful story of the battles of the United States and Japan on the bitter rim of the North Pacific, has been acclaimed as one of the great accounts of World War II. Brian Garfield, a novelist and screenwriter whose works have sold some 20 million copies, was searching for a new subject when he came upon the story of this "forgotten war" in Alaska. He found the history of the brave men who had served in the Aleutians so compelling and so little known that he wrote the first full-length history of the Aleutian campaign, and the book remains a favorite among Alaskans. The war in the Aleutians was fought in some of the worst climatic conditions on earth for men, ships, and airplanes. The sea was rough, the islands craggy and unwelcoming, and enemy number one was always the weather--the savage wind, fog, and rain of the Aleutian chain. The fog seemed to reach even into the minds of the military commanders on both sides, as they directed men into situations that so often had tragic results. Frustrating, befuddling, and still the subject of debate, the Aleutian campaign nevertheless marked an important turn of the war in favor of the United States. Now, half a century after the war ended, more of the fog has been lifted. In the updated University of Alaska Press edition, Garfield supplements his original account, which was drawn from statistics, personal interviews, letters, and diaries, with more recently declassified photographs and many more illustrations.

This Republic of Suffering

Death and the American Civil War

Author: Drew Gilpin Faust

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0375703837

Category: History

Page: 346

View: 5470

Assesses the impact of the enormous carnage of the Civil War on every aspect of American life from a material, political, intellectual, cultural, social, and spiritual perspective.

The Publishers Weekly

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: American literature

Page: N.A

View: 5470

Hitler's First War

Adolf Hitler, the Men of the List Regiment, and the First World War

Author: Thomas Weber

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199233209

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 450

View: 8887

The story of Hitler's formative experiences as a soldier on the Western Front - now told in full for the first time. Hitler's First War is a radical revision of the period of Hitler's life that is said to have made him. Through the stories of the veterans of his regiment, Thomas Weber challenges the mythical view presented in Mein Kampf to show a Hitler who was shunned by the frontline soldiers of his regiment as a 'rear area pig' and who wasstill unsure of his political ideology even at the end of the war in 1918.

The Second World War

Author: Antony Beevor

Publisher: Back Bay Books

ISBN: 0316084077

Category: History

Page: 880

View: 979

A masterful and comprehensive chronicle of World War II, by internationally bestselling historian Antony Beevor. Over the past two decades, Antony Beevor has established himself as one of the world's premier historians of WWII. His multi-award winning books have included Stalingrad and The Fall of Berlin 1945. Now, in his newest and most ambitious book, he turns his focus to one of the bloodiest and most tragic events of the twentieth century, the Second World War. In this searing narrative that takes us from Hitler's invasion of Poland on September 1st, 1939 to V-J day on August 14th, 1945 and the war's aftermath, Beevor describes the conflict and its global reach--one that included every major power. The result is a dramatic and breathtaking single-volume history that provides a remarkably intimate account of the war that, more than any other, still commands attention and an audience. Thrillingly written and brilliantly researched, Beevor's grand and provocative account is destined to become the definitive work on this complex, tragic, and endlessly fascinating period in world history, and confirms once more that he is a military historian of the first rank.

Conscience

Two Soldiers, Two Pacifists, One Family--a Test of Will andFaith in World War I

Author: Louisa Thomas

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101515309

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 1773

Norman Thomas and his brothers' upbringing prepared them for a life of service-but their calls to conscience threatened to tear them apart Conscience is Louisa Thomas's beautifully written account of the remarkable Thomas brothers at the turn of the twentieth century. At a time of trial, each brother struggled to understand his obligation to his country, family, and faith. Centered around the story of the eldest, Norman Thomas (later the six-time Socialist candidate for president), the book explores the difficult decisions the four brothers faced with the advent of World War I. Sons of a Presbyterian minister and grandsons of missionaries, they shared a rigorous moral upbringing, a Princeton education, and a faith in the era's spirit of hope. Two became soldiers. Ralph enlisted right away, heeding President Woodrow Wilson's call to fight for freedom. A captain in the Army Corps of Engineers, he was ultimately wounded in France. Arthur, the youngest, was less certain about the righteousness of the cause but sensitive to his obligation as a citizen-and like so many men eager to have a chance to prove himself. The other two were pacifists. Evan became a conscientious objector, protesting conscription; when the truce was signed on November 11, 1918, he was in solitary confinement. Norman left his ministry in the tenements of East Harlem, New York, and began down the course he would follow for the rest of his life, fighting for civil liberties, social justice, and greater equality, and against violence as a method of change. Conscience reveals the tension among responsibilities, beliefs, and desires, between ideas and actions-and, sometimes, between brothers. Conscience moves from the gothic buildings of Princeton to the tenements of New York City, from the West Wing of the White House to the battlefields of France, tracking how four young men navigated a period of great uncertainty and upheaval. A Thomas family member herself (Norman was Louisa's great grandfather), Thomas proposes that there is something we might recover from the brothers' debates about conscience: a way of talking about personal liberty and social obligation, about being true to oneself and to one another. Louisa Thomas's newest book, Louisa, will be published by Penguin Press on April 5th, 2016. From the Hardcover edition.

Mind Games

The Guide to Inner Space

Author: Robert E. L. Masters,Jean Houston

Publisher: Quest Books

ISBN: 9780835607537

Category: Self-Help

Page: 237

View: 1000

A series of mental exercises designed for group participation focuses on the roles of reasoning and imagination in achieving sensory perception

The War That Saved My Life

Author: Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0147510481

Category: Abusive parents

Page: 336

View: 4615

A young disabled girl and her brother are evacuated from London to the English countryside during World War II, where they find life to be much sweeter away from their abusive mother.

The Lost City of Z

A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon

Author: David Grann

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780385529228

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 1082

The #1 New York Times bestseller - now a major motion picture starring Charlie Hunnam, Tom Holland, Sienna Miller and Robert Pattinson. In 1925, the legendary British explorer Percy Fawcett ventured into the Amazon jungle, in search of a fabled civilization. He never returned. Over the years countless perished trying to find evidence of his party and the place he called “The Lost City of Z.” In this masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, journalist David Grann interweaves the spellbinding stories of Fawcett’s quest for “Z” and his own journey into the deadly jungle, as he unravels the greatest exploration mystery of the twentieth century.

Ask Alice

A Novel

Author: D. J. Taylor

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1453226109

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 6585

A literary tour-de-force ranging from the American frontier to the decadent carousing of the bright young people of London’s Jazz Age “A clever, stylish entertainment with dark undercurrents, set in the first third of the 20th century, Ask Alice traces the rise of an orphaned Kansas girl from pretty young thing on the prairie to bright young thing in 1920s London to society hostess in the ’30s. Taylor—a British novelist and biographer of Thackeray and Orwell—alternates point of view between the woman and a boy of uncertain parentage. The book has all the makings of Victorian high drama—a slew of colorful characters, vivid and varied scenes, precipitous changes in fortune, and inescapable revelations of long-buried secrets.” —The Atlantic Monthly