Lower Ed

The Troubling Rise of For-Profit Colleges in the New Economy

Author: Tressie McMillan Cottom

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 162097472X

Category: Education

Page: N.A

View: 3963

“The best book yet on the complex lives and choices of for-profit students.” —The New York Times Book Review As featured on The Daily Show, NPR’s Marketplace, and Fresh Air, the “powerful, chilling tale” (Carol Anderson, author of White Rage) of higher education becoming an engine of social inequality “p>Lower Ed is quickly becoming the definitive book on the fastest-growing sector of higher education at the turn of the twenty-first century: for-profit colleges. With sharp insight and deliberate acumen, Tressie McMillan Cottom—a sociologist who was once a recruiter at two for-profit colleges—expertly parses the fraught dynamics of this big-money industry. Drawing on more than one hundred interviews with students, employees, executives, and activists, Lower Ed details the benefits, pitfalls, and real costs of the expansion of for-profit colleges. Now with a new foreword by Stephanie Kelton, economic advisor to Bernie Sanders’s presidential campaign, this smart and essential book cuts to the very core of our nation’s broken social contracts and the challenges we face in our divided, unequal society.

Lower Ed

The Troubling Rise of For-Profit Colleges in the New Economy

Author: Tressie McMillan Cottom

Publisher: New Press, The

ISBN: 162097102X

Category: Education

Page: 256

View: 6530

“The best book yet on the complex lives and choices of for-profit students.” —The New York Times Book Review More than two million students are enrolled in for-profit colleges, from the small family-run operations to the behemoths brandished on billboards, subway ads, and late-night commercials. These schools have been around just as long as their bucolic not-for-profit counterparts, yet shockingly little is known about why they have expanded so rapidly in recent years—during the so-called Wall Street era of for-profit colleges. In Lower Ed Tressie McMillan Cottom—a bold and rising public scholar, herself once a recruiter at two for-profit colleges—expertly parses the fraught dynamics of this big-money industry to show precisely how it is part and parcel of the growing inequality plaguing the country today. McMillan Cottom discloses the shrewd recruitment and marketing strategies that these schools deploy and explains how, despite the well-documented predatory practices of some and the campus closings of others, ending for-profit colleges won’t end the vulnerabilities that made them the fastest growing sector of higher education at the turn of the twenty-first century. And she doesn’t stop there. With sharp insight and deliberate acumen, McMillan Cottom delivers a comprehensive view of postsecondary for-profit education by illuminating the experiences of the everyday people behind the shareholder earnings, congressional battles, and student debt disasters. The relatable human stories in Lower Ed—from mothers struggling to pay for beauty school to working class guys seeking “good jobs” to accomplished professionals pursuing doctoral degrees—illustrate that the growth of for-profit colleges is inextricably linked to larger questions of race, gender, work, and the promise of opportunity in America. Drawing on more than one hundred interviews with students, employees, executives, and activists, Lower Ed tells the story of the benefits, pitfalls, and real costs of a for-profit education. It is a story about broken social contracts; about education transforming from a public interest to a private gain; and about all Americans and the challenges we face in our divided, unequal society.

Lower Ed

The Troubling Rise of For-profit Colleges in the New Economy

Author: Tressie McMillan Cottom

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781620974384

Category: Education

Page: 240

View: 7284

"The best book yet on the complex lives and choices of for-profit students." --The New York Times Book Review As featured on The Daily Show, NPR's Marketplace, and Fresh Air, the "powerful, chilling tale" (Carol Anderson, author of White Rage) of higher education becoming an engine of social inequality Published to rave reviews and a flurry of media buzz--including a laudatory tweet from none other than Oprah herself--Lower Ed is quickly becoming the definitive book on an economic and social phenomenon that has shaken the very core of opportunity in America. With sharp insight and deliberate acumen, Tressie McMillan Cottom, an associate professor of sociology who was once a recruiter at two for-profit colleges, expertly parses the fraught dynamics of the big-money industry of for-profit colleges, the fastest-growing sector of higher education at the turn of the twenty-first century. Drawing on more than one hundred interviews with students, employees, executives, and activists, Lower Ed details the benefits, pitfalls, and real costs of the expansion of for-profit colleges. Featured by Newsweek, The Atlantic, Vibe magazine, Mother Jones, the Chronicle of Higher Education, Slate, Pacific Standard, and several other outlets, this is a smart, essential look at our nation's broken social contracts and the challenges we face in our divided, unequal society.

Higher Ed, Inc.

The Rise of the For-Profit University

Author: Richard S. Ruch

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801874475

Category: Education

Page: 200

View: 6919

"A balanced description of how and why [for-profit colleges and universities] continue to attract growing enrollments, and his text will be useful for anyone who wants to understand this significant trend." -- Library Journal

Unequal Colleges in the Age of Disparity

Author: Charles T. Clotfelter

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674982517

Category: Education

Page: 380

View: 672

Based on quantitative comparisons of colleges since the 1970s, Charles Clotfelter reveals that despite the civil rights revolution, billions spent on financial aid, and the commitment of colleges to greater equality, stratification in higher education has grown starker. He explains why undergraduate education—unequal in 1970—is even more so today.

Late to Class

Social Class and Schooling in the New Economy

Author: Jane A. Van Galen

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 0791480143

Category: Education

Page: 376

View: 3611

Looks at the educational experiences of poor, working class, and middle class students against the backdrop of complicated class stratification in a shifting global economy.

Sociology of Higher Education

Contributions and Their Contexts

Author: Patricia J. Gumport

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801892158

Category: Education

Page: 400

View: 1064

Featuring extensive reviews of the literature, this volume will be invaluable for scholars and students of sociology and higher education.

The Education Gospel

Author: W. Norton GRUBB,Marvin Lazerson

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674037984

Category: Education

Page: 331

View: 5336

How the University Works

Higher Education and the Low-Wage Nation

Author: Marc Bousquet,Cary Nelson

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814791127

Category: Education

Page: 281

View: 1900

As much as we think we know about the modern university, very little has been said about what it's like to work there. Instead of the high-wage, high-profit world of knowledge work, most campus employees—including the vast majority of faculty—really work in the low-wage, low-profit sphere of the service economy. Tenure-track positions are at an all-time low, with adjuncts and graduate students teaching the majority of courses. This super-exploited corps of disposable workers commonly earn fewer than $16,000 annually, without benefits, teaching as many as eight classes per year. Even undergraduates are being exploited as a low-cost, disposable workforce. Marc Bousquet, a major figure in the academic labor movement, exposes the seamy underbelly of higher education—a world where faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates work long hours for fast-food wages. Assessing the costs of higher education’s corporatization on faculty and students at every level, How the University Works is urgent reading for anyone interested in the fate of the university.

Creating a Class

Author: Mitchell L Stevens

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674044037

Category: Education

Page: 318

View: 2956

In real life, Stevens is a professor at Stanford University. But for a year and a half, he worked in the admissions office of a bucolic New England college known for its high academic standards, beautiful campus, and social conscience. Ambitious high schoolers and savvy guidance counselors know that admission here is highly competitive. But creating classes, Stevens finds, is a lot more complicated than most people imagine.

Postsecondary Education for First-Generation and Low-Income Students in the Ivy League

Navigating Policy and Practice

Author: Kerry H. Landers

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319634569

Category: Education

Page: 257

View: 7100

This book examines how previously excluded high-achieving, low-income students are faring socially and academically at an Ivy League college in New England. In the past, research conducted on low-income students in elite schools focused mainly on the admissions process. As a result, there is a dearth of research on what happens to low-income students once they are admitted and attend classes. This book chronicles an ethnographic study of twenty low-income men and women in their senior year at Dartmouth College and follows up with them four and twelve years post-graduation. By helping to bring visibility and self-awareness to low-income students and expose class issues and struggles, the author hopes to encourage elite institutions to change their policies and practices to address the needs of these students.

Paying the Price

College Costs, Financial Aid, and the Betrayal of the American Dream

Author: Sara Goldrick-Rab

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022640448X

Category: Education

Page: 368

View: 3831

If you are a young person, and you work hard enough, you can get a college degree and set yourself on the path to a good life, right? Not necessarily, says Sara Goldrick-Rab, and with Paying the Price, she shows in damning detail exactly why. Quite simply, college is far too expensive for many people today, and the confusing mix of federal, state, institutional, and private financial aid leaves countless students without the resources they need to pay for it. Drawing on an unprecedented study of 3,000 young adults who entered public colleges and universities in Wisconsin in 2008 with the support of federal aid and Pell Grants, Goldrick-Rab reveals the devastating effect of these shortfalls. Half the students in the study left college without a degree, while less than 20 percent finished within five years. The cause of their problems, time and again, was lack of money. Unable to afford tuition, books, and living expenses, they worked too many hours at outside jobs, dropped classes, took time off to save money, and even went without adequate food or housing. In many heartbreaking cases, they simply left school—not with a degree, but with crippling debt. Goldrick-Rab combines that shocking data with devastating stories of six individual students, whose struggles make clear the horrifying human and financial costs of our convoluted financial aid policies. America can fix this problem. In the final section of the book, Goldrick-Rab offers a range of possible solutions, from technical improvements to the financial aid application process, to a bold, public sector–focused “first degree free” program. What’s not an option, this powerful book shows, is doing nothing, and continuing to crush the college dreams of a generation of young people.

Interrupting Class Inequality in Higher Education

Leadership for an Equitable Future

Author: Laura M. Harrison,Monica Hatfield Price

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1317210670

Category: Education

Page: 164

View: 3593

Interrupting Class Inequality in Higher Education explores why socioeconomic inequality persists in higher education despite widespread knowledge of the problem. Through a critical analysis of the current leadership practices and policy narratives that perpetuate socioeconomic inequality, this book outlines the trends that negatively impact low- and middle-income students and offers effective tools for creating a more equitable future for higher education. By taking a solution-focused approach, this book will help higher education students, leaders, and policy makers move from despair and inertia to hope and action.

For-Profit Universities

The Shifting Landscape of Marketized Higher Education

Author: Tressie McMillan Cottom,William A. Darity, Jr.

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319471872

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 224

View: 331

This edited volume proposes that the phenomenon of private sector, financialized higher education expansion in the United States benefits from a range of theoretical and methodological treatments. Social scientists, policy analysts, researchers, and for-profit sector leaders discuss how and to what ends for-profit colleges are a functional social good. The chapters include discussions of inequality, stratification, and legitimacy, differing greatly from other work on for-profit colleges in three ways: First, this volume moves beyond rational choice explanations of for-profit expansion to include critical theoretical work. Second, it deals with the nuances of race, class, and gender in ways absent from other research. Finally, the book's interdisciplinary focus is uniquely equipped to deal with the complexity of high-cost, low-status, for-profit credentialism at a scale never before seen.

Digital Sociologies

Author: Daniels, Jessie,Gregory, Karen,Tressie McMillan Cottom

Publisher: Policy Press

ISBN: 1447329007

Category: Computers

Page: 528

View: 5874

This is the first book to connect digital media technologies in digital sociology to traditional sociological and offers a much needed overview of it. It includes problems of the digital age in relation to inequality and identity, making it suitable for use for a global audience on a variety of courses.

Creating the Market University

How Academic Science Became an Economic Engine

Author: Elizabeth Popp Berman

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691147086

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 265

View: 3140

"Academic science in the U.S. once self-consciously avoided the market. But today it is seen as an economic engine that keeps the nation globally competitive. Creating the Market University compares the origins of biotech entrepreneurship, university patenting, and university-industry research centers to show how government decisions shaped by a new argument--that innovation drives the economy-transformed academic science"-- Provided by publisher.

Universities in the Marketplace

The Commercialization of Higher Education

Author: Derek Bok

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400825493

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 256

View: 1226

Is everything in a university for sale if the price is right? In this book, one of America's leading educators cautions that the answer is all too often "yes." Taking the first comprehensive look at the growing commercialization of our academic institutions, Derek Bok probes the efforts on campus to profit financially not only from athletics but increasingly, from education and research as well. He shows how such ventures are undermining core academic values and what universities can do to limit the damage. Commercialization has many causes, but it could never have grown to its present state had it not been for the recent, rapid growth of money-making opportunities in a more technologically complex, knowledge-based economy. A brave new world has now emerged in which university presidents, enterprising professors, and even administrative staff can all find seductive opportunities to turn specialized knowledge into profit. Bok argues that universities, faced with these temptations, are jeopardizing their fundamental mission in their eagerness to make money by agreeing to more and more compromises with basic academic values. He discusses the dangers posed by increased secrecy in corporate-funded research, for-profit Internet companies funded by venture capitalists, industry-subsidized educational programs for physicians, conflicts of interest in research on human subjects, and other questionable activities. While entrepreneurial universities may occasionally succeed in the short term, reasons Bok, only those institutions that vigorously uphold academic values, even at the cost of a few lucrative ventures, will win public trust and retain the respect of faculty and students. Candid, evenhanded, and eminently readable, Universities in the Marketplace will be widely debated by all those concerned with the future of higher education in America and beyond.

White Rage

The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide

Author: Carol Anderson

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1632864142

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 1541

National Book Critics Circle Award Winner New York Times Bestseller A New York Times Notable Book of the Year A Washington Post Notable Nonfiction Book of the Year A Boston Globe Best Book of 2016 A Chicago Review of Books Best Nonfiction Book of 2016 From the Civil War to our combustible present, acclaimed historian Carol Anderson reframes our continuing conversation about race, chronicling the powerful forces opposed to black progress in America. As Ferguson, Missouri, erupted in August 2014, and media commentators across the ideological spectrum referred to the angry response of African Americans as "black rage,†? historian Carol Anderson wrote a remarkable op-ed in The Washington Post suggesting that this was, instead, "white rage at work. With so much attention on the flames," she argued, "everyone had ignored the kindling." Since 1865 and the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, every time African Americans have made advances towards full participation in our democracy, white reaction has fueled a deliberate and relentless rollback of their gains. The end of the Civil War and Reconstruction was greeted with the Black Codes and Jim Crow; the Supreme Court's landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision was met with the shutting down of public schools throughout the South while taxpayer dollars financed segregated white private schools; the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965 triggered a coded but powerful response, the so-called Southern Strategy and the War on Drugs that disenfranchised millions of African Americans while propelling presidents Nixon and Reagan into the White House, and then the election of America's first black President, led to the expression of white rage that has been as relentless as it has been brutal. Carefully linking these and other historical flashpoints when social progress for African Americans was countered by deliberate and cleverly crafted opposition, Anderson pulls back the veil that has long covered actions made in the name of protecting democracy, fiscal responsibility, or protection against fraud, rendering visible the long lineage of white rage. Compelling and dramatic in the unimpeachable history it relates, White Rage will add an important new dimension to the national conversation about race in America.

Performance Funding for Higher Education

Author: Kevin J. Dougherty,Sosanya M. Jones,Hana Lahr,Rebecca S. Natow,Lara Pheatt

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 142142083X

Category: Education

Page: 276

View: 3183

Seeking greater accountability in higher education, many states have adopted performance funding, tying state financial support of colleges and universities directly to institutional performance based on specific outcomes such as student retention, progression, and graduation. Now in place in over thirty states, performance funding for higher education has been endorsed by the US Department of Education and major funders like the Gates and Lumina foundations. Focusing on three states that are regarded as leaders in the movement—Indiana, Ohio, and Tennessee— Performance Funding for Higher Education presents the findings of a three-year research study on its implementation and impacts. Written by leading authorities and drawing on extensive interviews with government officials and college and university staff members, this book · describes the policy instruments states use to implement performance funding; · explores the organizational processes colleges rely on to determine how to respond to performance funding; · analyzes the influence of performance funding on institutional policies and programs; · reviews the impacts of performance funding on student outcomes; · examines the obstacles institutions encounter in responding to performance funding demands;· investigates the unintended impacts of performance funding. The authors conclude that, while performance funding clearly grabs the attention of colleges and leads them to change their policies and practices, it also encounters major obstacles and has unintended impacts. Colleges subject to performance funding are hindered in posting good results by inappropriate performance measures, insufficient organizational infrastructure, and the commitment to enroll many students who are poorly prepared or not interested in degrees. These obstacles help explain why multivariate statistical studies have failed to date to find a significant impact of performance funding on student outcomes, and why colleges are tempted to resort to weakening academic quality and restricting the admission of less-prepared and less-advantaged students in order to improve their apparent performance. These findings have wide-ranging implications for policy and research. Ultimately, the authors recommend that states create new ways of helping colleges with many at-risk students, define performance indicators and measures better tailored to institutional missions, and improve the capacity of colleges to engage in organizational learning.