Mathematical Logic

Author: H.-D. Ebbinghaus,J. Flum,Wolfgang Thomas

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1475723555

Category: Mathematics

Page: 291

View: 7805

This introduction to first-order logic clearly works out the role of first-order logic in the foundations of mathematics, particularly the two basic questions of the range of the axiomatic method and of theorem-proving by machines. It covers several advanced topics not commonly treated in introductory texts, such as Fraïssé's characterization of elementary equivalence, Lindström's theorem on the maximality of first-order logic, and the fundamentals of logic programming.

Mathematical Logic

Author: J.D. Monk

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 146849452X

Category: Mathematics

Page: 532

View: 2236

From the Introduction: "We shall base our discussion on a set-theoretical foundation like that used in developing analysis, or algebra, or topology. We may consider our task as that of giving a mathematical analysis of the basic concepts of logic and mathematics themselves. Thus we treat mathematical and logical practice as given empirical data and attempt to develop a purely mathematical theory of logic abstracted from these data." There are 31 chapters in 5 parts and approximately 320 exercises marked by difficulty and whether or not they are necessary for further work in the book.

Introduction to Mathematical Logic, Fourth Edition

Author: Elliott Mendelson

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 9780412808302

Category: Mathematics

Page: 440

View: 4446

The Fourth Edition of this long-established text retains all the key features of the previous editions, covering the basic topics of a solid first course in mathematical logic. This edition includes an extensive appendix on second-order logic, a section on set theory with urlements, and a section on the logic that results when we allow models with empty domains. The text contains numerous exercises and an appendix furnishes answers to many of them. Introduction to Mathematical Logic includes: propositional logic first-order logic first-order number theory and the incompleteness and undecidability theorems of Gödel, Rosser, Church, and Tarski axiomatic set theory theory of computability The study of mathematical logic, axiomatic set theory, and computability theory provides an understanding of the fundamental assumptions and proof techniques that form basis of mathematics. Logic and computability theory have also become indispensable tools in theoretical computer science, including artificial intelligence. Introduction to Mathematical Logic covers these topics in a clear, reader-friendly style that will be valued by anyone working in computer science as well as lecturers and researchers in mathematics, philosophy, and related fields.

A Course on Mathematical Logic

Author: Shashi Mohan Srivastava

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1461457467

Category: Mathematics

Page: 198

View: 335

This is a short, modern, and motivated introduction to mathematical logic for upper undergraduate and beginning graduate students in mathematics and computer science. Any mathematician who is interested in getting acquainted with logic and would like to learn Gödel’s incompleteness theorems should find this book particularly useful. The treatment is thoroughly mathematical and prepares students to branch out in several areas of mathematics related to foundations and computability, such as logic, axiomatic set theory, model theory, recursion theory, and computability. In this new edition, many small and large changes have been made throughout the text. The main purpose of this new edition is to provide a healthy first introduction to model theory, which is a very important branch of logic. Topics in the new chapter include ultraproduct of models, elimination of quantifiers, types, applications of types to model theory, and applications to algebra, number theory and geometry. Some proofs, such as the proof of the very important completeness theorem, have been completely rewritten in a more clear and concise manner. The new edition also introduces new topics, such as the notion of elementary class of structures, elementary diagrams, partial elementary maps, homogeneous structures, definability, and many more.

Introduction to Mathematical Logic

Set Theory Computable Functions Model Theory

Author: Jerome Malitz

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1461394414

Category: Mathematics

Page: 198

View: 4651

This book is intended as an undergraduate senior level or beginning graduate level text for mathematical logic. There are virtually no prere quisites, although a familiarity with notions encountered in a beginning course in abstract algebra such as groups, rings, and fields will be useful in providing some motivation for the topics in Part III. An attempt has been made to develop the beginning of each part slowly and then to gradually quicken the pace and the complexity of the material. Each part ends with a brief introduction to selected topics of current interest. The text is divided into three parts: one dealing with set theory, another with computable function theory, and the last with model theory. Part III relies heavily on the notation, concepts and results discussed in Part I and to some extent on Part II. Parts I and II are independent of each other, and each provides enough material for a one semester course. The exercises cover a wide range of difficulty with an emphasis on more routine problems in the earlier sections of each part in order to familiarize the reader with the new notions and methods. The more difficult exercises are accompanied by hints. In some cases significant theorems are devel oped step by step with hints in the problems. Such theorems are not used later in the sequence.

Mathematical Logic

Author: Stephen Cole Kleene

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486317072

Category: Mathematics

Page: 416

View: 8248

Contents include an elementary but thorough overview of mathematical logic of 1st order; formal number theory; surveys of the work by Church, Turing, and others, including Gödel's completeness theorem, Gentzen's theorem, more.

Philosophical and Mathematical Logic

Author: Harrie de Swart

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783030032531

Category: Philosophy

Page: 539

View: 6019

This book was written to serve as an introduction to logic, with in each chapter – if applicable – special emphasis on the interplay between logic and philosophy, mathematics, language and (theoretical) computer science. The reader will not only be provided with an introduction to classical logic, but to philosophical (modal, epistemic, deontic, temporal) and intuitionistic logic as well. The first chapter is an easy to read non-technical Introduction to the topics in the book. The next chapters are consecutively about Propositional Logic, Sets (finite and infinite), Predicate Logic, Arithmetic and Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorems, Modal Logic, Philosophy of Language, Intuitionism and Intuitionistic Logic, Applications (Prolog; Relational Databases and SQL; Social Choice Theory, in particular Majority Judgment) and finally, Fallacies and Unfair Discussion Methods. Throughout the text, the author provides some impressions of the historical development of logic: Stoic and Aristotelian logic, logic in the Middle Ages and Frege's Begriffsschrift, together with the works of George Boole (1815-1864) and August De Morgan (1806-1871), the origin of modern logic. Since "if ..., then ..." can be considered to be the heart of logic, throughout this book much attention is paid to conditionals: material, strict and relevant implication, entailment, counterfactuals and conversational implicature are treated and many references for further reading are given. Each chapter is concluded with answers to the exercises.

An Introduction to Mathematical Logic

Author: Richard E. Hodel

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486497852

Category: Mathematics

Page: 491

View: 5020

This comprehensive overview ofmathematical logic is designedprimarily for advanced undergraduatesand graduate studentsof mathematics. The treatmentalso contains much of interest toadvanced students in computerscience and philosophy. Topics include propositional logic;first-order languages and logic; incompleteness, undecidability,and indefinability; recursive functions; computability;and Hilbert’s Tenth Problem.Reprint of the PWS Publishing Company, Boston, 1995edition.

Introduction to Mathematical Structures and Proofs

Author: Larry J. Gerstein

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1461442656

Category: Mathematics

Page: 401

View: 4770

As a student moves from basic calculus courses into upper-division courses in linear and abstract algebra, real and complex analysis, number theory, topology, and so on, a "bridge" course can help ensure a smooth transition. Introduction to Mathematical Structures and Proofs is a textbook intended for such a course, or for self-study. This book introduces an array of fundamental mathematical structures. It also explores the delicate balance of intuition and rigor—and the flexible thinking—required to prove a nontrivial result. In short, this book seeks to enhance the mathematical maturity of the reader. The new material in this second edition includes a section on graph theory, several new sections on number theory (including primitive roots, with an application to card-shuffling), and a brief introduction to the complex numbers (including a section on the arithmetic of the Gaussian integers). Solutions for even numbered exercises are available on springer.com for instructors adopting the text for a course.

Fundamentals of Mathematical Logic

Author: Peter G. Hinman

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 1439864276

Category: Mathematics

Page: 894

View: 2668

This introductory graduate text covers modern mathematical logic from propositional, first-order and infinitary logic and Gödel's Incompleteness Theorems to extensive introductions to set theory, model theory and recursion (computability) theory. Based on the author's more than 35 years of teaching experience, the book develops students' intuition by presenting complex ideas in the simplest context for which they make sense. The book is appropriate for use as a classroom text, for self-study, and as a reference on the state of modern logic.

A Friendly Introduction to Mathematical Logic

Author: Christopher C. Leary,Lars Kristiansen

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 1942341075

Category:

Page: 380

View: 4949

At the intersection of mathematics, computer science, and philosophy, mathematical logic examines the power and limitations of formal mathematical thinking. In this expansion of Leary's user-friendly 1st edition, readers with no previous study in the field are introduced to the basics of model theory, proof theory, and computability theory. The text is designed to be used either in an upper division undergraduate classroom, or for self study. Updating the 1st Edition's treatment of languages, structures, and deductions, leading to rigorous proofs of Godel's First and Second Incompleteness Theorems, the expanded 2nd Edition includes a new introduction to incompleteness through computability as well as solutions to selected exercises."

A Beginner's Guide to Mathematical Logic

Author: Raymond M. Smullyan

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486782972

Category: Mathematics

Page: 304

View: 7417

Combining stories of great writers and philosophers with quotations and riddles, this completely original text for first courses in mathematical logic examines problems related to proofs, propositional logic and first-order logic, undecidability, and other topics. 2013 edition.

A Mathematical Introduction to Logic

Author: Herbert Enderton,Herbert B. Enderton

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 0080496466

Category: Mathematics

Page: 317

View: 8557

A Mathematical Introduction to Logic, Second Edition, offers increased flexibility with topic coverage, allowing for choice in how to utilize the textbook in a course. The author has made this edition more accessible to better meet the needs of today's undergraduate mathematics and philosophy students. It is intended for the reader who has not studied logic previously, but who has some experience in mathematical reasoning. Material is presented on computer science issues such as computational complexity and database queries, with additional coverage of introductory material such as sets. * Increased flexibility of the text, allowing instructors more choice in how they use the textbook in courses. * Reduced mathematical rigour to fit the needs of undergraduate students

The Art of Proof

Basic Training for Deeper Mathematics

Author: Matthias Beck,Ross Geoghegan

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9781441970237

Category: Mathematics

Page: 182

View: 5783

The Art of Proof is designed for a one-semester or two-quarter course. A typical student will have studied calculus (perhaps also linear algebra) with reasonable success. With an artful mixture of chatty style and interesting examples, the student's previous intuitive knowledge is placed on solid intellectual ground. The topics covered include: integers, induction, algorithms, real numbers, rational numbers, modular arithmetic, limits, and uncountable sets. Methods, such as axiom, theorem and proof, are taught while discussing the mathematics rather than in abstract isolation. The book ends with short essays on further topics suitable for seminar-style presentation by small teams of students, either in class or in a mathematics club setting. These include: continuity, cryptography, groups, complex numbers, ordinal number, and generating functions.

The Elements of Mathematical Logic

Author: Paul C. Rosenbloom

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486446174

Category: Mathematics

Page: 214

View: 8148

This introduction to mathematical logic stresses the use of logical methods in attacking nontrivial problems. It covers the logic of classes, of propositions, of propositional functions, and the general syntax of language, with a brief introduction to so-called undecidability and incompleteness theorems; and much more. 1950 edition.

Proofs and Fundamentals

A First Course in Abstract Mathematics

Author: Ethan D. Bloch

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1461221307

Category: Mathematics

Page: 424

View: 9541

The aim of this book is to help students write mathematics better. Throughout it are large exercise sets well-integrated with the text and varying appropriately from easy to hard. Basic issues are treated, and attention is given to small issues like not placing a mathematical symbol directly after a punctuation mark. And it provides many examples of what students should think and what they should write and how these two are often not the same.

Mathematical Logic

Author: Ian Chiswell,Wilfrid Hodges

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780199215621

Category: Mathematics

Page: 250

View: 1465

Assuming no previous study in logic, this informal yet rigorous text covers the material of a standard undergraduate first course in mathematical logic, using natural deduction and leading up to the completeness theorem for first-order logic. At each stage of the text, the reader is given an intuition based on standard mathematical practice, which is subsequently developed with clean formal mathematics. Alongside the practical examples, readers learn what can and can't be calculated; for example the correctness of a derivation proving a given sequent can be tested mechanically, but there is no general mechanical test for the existence of a derivation proving the given sequent. The undecidability results are proved rigorously in an optional final chapter, assuming Matiyasevich's theorem characterising the computably enumerable relations. Rigorous proofs of the adequacy and completeness proofs of the relevant logics are provided, with careful attention to the languages involved. Optional sections discuss the classification of mathematical structures by first-order theories; the required theory of cardinality is developed from scratch. Throughout the book there are notes on historical aspects of the material, and connections with linguistics and computer science, and the discussion of syntax and semantics is influenced by modern linguistic approaches. Two basic themes in recent cognitive science studies of actual human reasoning are also introduced. Including extensive exercises and selected solutions, this text is ideal for students in logic, mathematics, philosophy, and computer science.

Mathematical Logic for Computer Science

Author: Mordechai Ben-Ari

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1447141296

Category: Mathematics

Page: 346

View: 9392

Mathematical Logic for Computer Science is a mathematics textbook with theorems and proofs, but the choice of topics has been guided by the needs of students of computer science. The method of semantic tableaux provides an elegant way to teach logic that is both theoretically sound and easy to understand. The uniform use of tableaux-based techniques facilitates learning advanced logical systems based on what the student has learned from elementary systems. The logical systems presented are: propositional logic, first-order logic, resolution and its application to logic programming, Hoare logic for the verification of sequential programs, and linear temporal logic for the verification of concurrent programs. The third edition has been entirely rewritten and includes new chapters on central topics of modern computer science: SAT solvers and model checking.

A Course in Mathematical Logic

Author: John Lane Bell,Moshe Machover

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 0080934749

Category: Logic, Symbolic and mathematical

Page: 599

View: 8818

A comprehensive one-year graduate (or advanced undergraduate) course in mathematical logic and foundations of mathematics. No previous knowledge of logic is required; the book is suitable for self-study. Many exercises (with hints) are included.

Logic for Mathematicians

Author: A. G. Hamilton

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521368650

Category: Mathematics

Page: 228

View: 6544

This is an introductory textbook which is designed to be useful not only to intending logicians but also to mathematicians in general.