Mousepads, Shoe Leather, and Hope

Lessons from the Howard Dean Campaign for the Future of Internet Politics

Author: Zephyr Teachout,Thomas Streeter

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317255860

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 7649

Howard Dean's campaign for president changed the way in which campaigns are run today. With an unlikely collection of highly talented and motivated staffers drawn from a variety of backgrounds, the Dean campaign transformed the way in which money was raised and supporters galvanized by using the Internet. Surprisingly, many of the campaign staff members were neither computer whizzes nor practiced political operatives, even though that is how some of them are identified today. This book allows key individuals in the campaign the chance to tell their stories with an eye to documenting the Internet campaign revolution and providing lessons to future campaigns. Howard Dean's inspirational statement of what it took for his campaign to get as far as it did-"mousepads, shoe leather, and hope"-holds great wisdom for anyone campaigning today, especially the 2008 presidential candidates.

Taking Our Country Back

The Crafting of Networked Politics from Howard Dean to Barack Obama

Author: Daniel Kreiss

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199936781

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 230

View: 4255

Taking Our Country Back presents the previously untold history of the uptake of new media in Democratic electoral campaigning over the last decade. Drawing on open-ended interviews with more than fifty political staffers, fieldwork during the 2008 primaries and general election, and archival research, Daniel Kreiss shows how a group of young, technically-skilled internet staffers came together on the Howard Dean campaign and created a series of innovations in organization, tools, and practice that have changed the campaign game. After the election, these individuals founded an array of consulting firms and training organizations and staffed prominent Democratic campaigns. In the process, they carried their innovations across Democratic politics and contributed to a number of electoral victories, including Barack Obama's historic bid for the presidency. In revealing this history, the book provides a rich empirical look at the communication tools, practices, and infrastructure that shape contemporary online campaigning. Through a detailed history of new media and political campaigning, Taking Our Country Back contributes to an interdisciplinary body of scholarship from communication, sociology, and political science. The book theorizes processes of innovation in online electoral politics and gives readers a new understanding of how the internet and its use by the Dean campaign have fundamentally changed the field of political campaigning. Kreiss shows how these innovations, exemplified by the Dean and Obama campaigns, were the product of the movement of staffers between industries and within organizational structures. Such movement provided a space for technical development and incentives for experimentation. Taking Our Country Back is a serious and vital analysis, both on-the-ground and theoretical, of how a small group of internet staffers transformed what campaigning means today and how cultural work mobilizes and motivates supporters to participate in collective action.

The MoveOn Effect

The Unexpected Transformation of American Political Advocacy

Author: David Karpf

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199898375

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 1123

The Internet is facilitating a generational transition among American political advocacy organizations. This book provides a detailed exploration of how "netroots" advocacy groups - MoveOn.org, DailyKos.com, DemocracyforAmerica.com, and the Progressive Change Campaign Committee - differ from "legacy" peer organizations. It also explains the partisan character of these technological innovations.

Corruption in America

From Benjamin Franklin's Snuff Box to Citizens United

Author: Zephyr Teachout

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674745086

Category: Law

Page: 384

View: 2252

When Louis XVI gave Ben Franklin a diamond-encrusted snuffbox, the gift troubled Americans: it threatened to corrupt him by clouding his judgment. By contrast, in 2010 the Supreme Court gave corporations the right to spend unlimited money to influence elections. Zephyr Teachout shows that Citizens United was both bad law and bad history.

The Permanent Campaign

New Media, New Politics

Author: Greg Elmer,Ganaele Langlois,Fenwick McKelvey

Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated

ISBN: 9781433116063

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 144

View: 7838

From the social media-based 2008 Obama election campaign to the civic protest and political revolutions of the 2011 Arab Spring, the past few years have been marked by a widespread and complex shift in the political landscape, as the rise of participatory platforms- such as YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, and blogs- have multiplied the venues for political communication and activism. This book explores the emergence of a permanent campaign- the need for constant readiness- on networked communication platforms. With in-depth analyses of some of the most well-known participatory media today, this book offers a critical assessment of the constant efforts at managing the plurality of voices that characterize contemporary politics. -- from Publisher description.

The End of Big

How the Internet Makes David the New Goliath

Author: Nicco Mele

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 1250021855

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 310

View: 3244

Explores how seemingly innocuous technologies are unsettling the balance of power by putting it in the hands of the masses, citing a rise in misinformation, losses in government effectiveness, and highly competitive web-based businesses that are not subject to regulation.

Margin of Victory

How Technologists Help Politicians Win Elections

Author: Nathaniel G. Pearlman

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440802572

Category: Political Science

Page: 253

View: 2716

This book illuminates modern political technology, examining important technologies, companies, and people; putting recent innovations into historical context; and describing the possible future uses of technology in electoral politics.

The Net Effect

Romanticism, Capitalism, and the Internet

Author: Thomas Streeter

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814741150

Category: Computers

Page: 219

View: 1823

2012 Honorable Mention from the Association of Internet Researchers for their Annual Best Book Prize Outstanding Academic Title from 2011 by Choice Magazine This book about America's romance with computer communication looks at the internet, not as harbinger of the future or the next big thing, but as an expression of the times. Streeter demonstrates that our ideas about what connected computers are for have been in constant flux since their invention. In the 1950s they were imagined as the means for fighting nuclear wars, in the 1960s as systems for bringing mathematical certainty to the messy complexity of social life, in the 1970s as countercultural playgrounds, in the 1980s as an icon for what's good about free markets, in the 1990s as a new frontier to be conquered and, by the late 1990s, as the transcendence of markets in an anarchist open source utopia. The Net Effect teases out how culture has influenced the construction of the internet and how the structure of the internet has played a role in cultures of social and political thought. It argues that the internet's real and imagined anarchic qualities are not a product of the technology alone, but of the historical peculiarities of how it emerged and was embraced. Finding several different traditions at work in the development of the internet—most uniquely, romanticism—Streeter demonstrates how the creation of technology is shot through with profoundly cultural forces—with the deep weight of the remembered past, and the pressures of shared passions made articulate.

Defining Visual Rhetorics

Author: Charles A. Hill,Marguerite Helmers

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135628548

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 356

View: 6625

Images play an important role in developing consciousness and the relationship of the self to its surroundings. In this distinctive collection, editors Charles A. Hill and Marguerite Helmers examine the connection between visual images and persuasion, or how images act rhetorically upon viewers. Chapters included here highlight the differences and commonalities among a variety of projects identified as "visual rhetoric," leading to a more precise definition of the term and its role in rhetorical studies. Contributions to this volume consider a wide variety of sites of image production--from architecture to paintings, from film to needlepoint--in order to understand how images and texts work upon readers as symbolic forms of representation. Each chapter discusses, analyzes, and explains the visual aspect of a particular subject, and illustrates the ways in which messages and meaning are communicated visually. The contributions include work from rhetoric scholars in the English and communication disciplines, and represent a variety of methodologies--theoretical, textual analysis, psychological research, and cultural studies, among others. The editors seek to demonstrate that every new turn in the study of rhetorical practices reveals more possibilities for discussion, and that the recent "turn to the visual" has revealed an inexhaustible supply of new questions, problems, and objects for investigation. As a whole, the chapters presented here demonstrate the wide range of scholarship that is possible when a field begins to take seriously the analysis of images as important cultural and rhetorical forces. Defining Visual Rhetorics is appropriate for graduate or advanced undergraduate courses in rhetoric, English, mass communication, cultural studies, technical communication, and visual studies. It will also serve as an insightful resource for researchers, scholars, and educators interested in rhetoric, cultural studies, and communication studies.

Cyberactivism

Online Activism in Theory and Practice

Author: MARTHA MCCAUGHEY,Michael D. Ayers

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135381550

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 1935

Cyberactivism is a timely collection of essays examining the growing importance of online activism. The contributors show how online activists have not only incorporated recent technology as a tool for change, but also how they have changed the meaning of activism, what community means, and how they conceive of collective identity and democratic change. Topics addressed range from the Zapatista movement's use of the web to promote their cause globally to the establishment of alternative media sources like indymedia.org to the direct action of "hacktivists" who disrupt commercial computer networks. Cyberactivism is essential reading for anyone interested in understanding the impact of the Internet on politics today.

Media and Power

Author: James Curran

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134900376

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 9159

Media and Power addresses three key questions about the relationship between media and society. *How much power do the media have? *Who really controls the media? *What is the relationship between media and power in society? In this major new book, James Curran reviews the different answers which have been given, before advancing original interpretations in a series of ground-breaking essays. This book also provides a guided tour of the major debates in media studies. What part did the media play in the making of modern society? How did 'new media' change society in the past? Will radical media research recover from its mid-life crisis? Is public service television the dying product of the nation in an age of globalization? Media and Power provides both a clear introduction to media research and an innovative analysis of media power.

Going Dirty

The Art of Negative Campaigning

Author: David Mark

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 0742599825

Category: Social Science

Page: 300

View: 8088

Going Dirty is a history of negative campaigning in American politics and an examination of how candidates and political consultants have employed this often-controversial technique. The book includes case studies on notable races throughout the television era in which new negative campaign strategies were introduced, or existing tactics were refined and amplified upon. Strategies have included labeling opponents from non-traditional political backgrounds as dumb or lightweight, an approach that got upended when a veteran actor and rookie candidate named Ronald Reagan won the California governorship in 1966, setting him on a path to the White House. The negative tone of campaigns has also been ratcheted up dramatically since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001: Campaign commercials now routinely run pictures of international villains and suggest, sometimes overtly, at other times more subtly, that political opponents are less than resolute in prosecuting the war on terror. The book also outlines a series of races in which negative campaigning has backfired, because the charges were not credible or the candidate on the attack did not understand the political sentiments of the local electorate they were trying to persuade. The effect of newer technologies on negative campaigning is also examined, including blogs and Web video, in addition to tried and true methods like direct mail.

Presidential Road Show

Public Leadership in an Era of Party Polarization and Media Fragmentation

Author: Diane J. Heith

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317253531

Category: Political Science

Page: 192

View: 7627

In The Presidential Road Show: Public Leadership in an Era of Party Polarization and Media Fragmentation, Diane J. Heith evaluates presidential leadership by critically examining a fundamental tenet of the presidency: the national nature of the office. The fact that the entire nation votes for the office seemingly imbues the presidency with leadership opportunities that rest on appeals to the mass public. Yet, presidents earn the office not by appealing to the nation but rather by assembling a coalition of supporters, predominantly partisans. Moreover, once in office, recent presidents have had trouble controlling their message in the fragmented media environment. The combined constraints of the electoral coalition and media environment influence the nature of public leadership presidents can exercise. Using a data set containing not only speech content but also the classification of the audience, Diane J. Heith finds that rhetorical leadership is constituency driven and targets audiences differently. Comparing tone, content, and tactics of national and local speeches reveals that presidents are abandoning national strategies in favor of local leadership efforts that may be tailored to the variety of political contexts a president must confront.

A century of innovation

the 3M story

Author: Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780972230216

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 236

View: 9540

A compilation of 3M voices, memories, facts and experiences from the company's first 100 years.

Media and Conflict

Escalating Evil

Author: Cees Jan Hamelink

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317256190

Category: Education

Page: 192

View: 3084

The world faces explosive conflicts about the distribution and scarcity of resources, about ethnicity and religion, and about the risks of urban life. These conflicts can easily spiral out of control toward mass slaughter-an evil of huge proportions that is often escalated by the media. What should be done to prevent this lethal trend? We need to understand how the 'spiral of escalation' works. How do media create anxiety, provide space for agitation, and disconnect people? Three approaches to the prevention of mass mediated aggression are proposed in this book: an early warning system for incitement to mass destruction, the invitation to disarming conversations in urban space, and the teaching of 'compassionate communication' to children and others. Alertness to the recurrence of collective violence is urgently needed not only in unstable and poor societies, but also in established democracies. Ordinary people can be incited to the mass slaughter of other ordinary people anywhere. Understanding the media's role in this and acting to prevent it are key goals of this book.

Presidents and the Media

The Communicator in Chief

Author: Stephen E. Frantzich

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 135106472X

Category: Political Science

Page: 222

View: 7978

Is Donald Trump’s "War on the Media" new news, fake news, or business as usual? Presidents have always "used" the media and felt abused by it. Tried and true vehicles such as press conferences, routine speeches and the State of the Union address have served presidents’ interests and received significant coverage by the print media. As new technologies have entered the media spectrum, the speed and pervasiveness of these interactions have changed dramatically. President Obama ushered in the social media presidency, while President Trump has become the tweeter-in-chief. This book shows how each of these developments affects what is communicated and how it is received by the public.

Sex Museums

The Politics and Performance of Display

Author: Jennifer Tyburczy

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022631538X

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 3003

Winner of the 29th annual Lambda Literary Award for LGBT Studies All museums are sex museums. In Sex Museums, Jennifer Tyburczy takes a hard look at the formation of Western sexuality—particularly how categories of sexual normalcy and perversity are formed—and asks what role museums have played in using display as a technique for disciplining sexuality. Most museum exhibits, she argues, assume that white, patriarchal heterosexuality and traditional structures of intimacy, gender, and race represent national sexual culture for their visitors. Sex Museums illuminates the history of such heteronormativity at most museums and proposes alternative approaches for the future of public display projects, while also offering the reader curatorial tactics—what she calls queer curatorship—for exhibiting diverse sexualities in the twenty-first century. Tyburczy shows museums to be sites of culture-war theatrics, where dramatic civic struggles over how sex relates to public space, genealogies of taste and beauty, and performances of sexual identity are staged. Delving into the history of erotic artifacts, she analyzes how museums have historically approached the collection and display of the material culture of sex, which poses complex moral, political, and logistical dilemmas for the Western museum. Sex Museums unpacks the history of the museum and its intersections with the history of sexuality to argue that the Western museum context—from its inception to the present—marks a pivotal site in the construction of modern sexual subjectivity.

Recharge Your Batteries: Classroom Management

Author: Laura A. Riffel, Ph.D.,Jessica R. Eggleston, Doctoral Candidate

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 1329864255

Category: Education

Page: 190

View: 9100

This book designed to help teachers develop three strands of reinforcement in classroom management. Support, Interventions, and Reinforcement will be addressed in ways that help classroom teachers braid behavioral techniques into their strategies. The book will focus on environmental changes, replacement behavior teaching, and impacting our reactions as educators so that we feed the replacement behavior and extinguish the target behavior.

Women, Art, and Technology

Author: Judy Malloy

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262134248

Category: Art

Page: 541

View: 4183

A sourcebook to the intersection between art and technology identifies the major female players in this movement, featuring a series of essays exploring the line between these two fields written by artists and promoters who are well respected in their fields. (Fine Arts)

Spinner in Chief

How Presidents Sell Their Policies and Themselves

Author: Stephen J. Farnsworth

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131725158X

Category: Political Science

Page: 200

View: 4121

As the U.S. enters the last lap of the 2008 presidential election season, the media and the candidates are in full gear exploiting each other, often at the expense of public information and awareness. This book looks at how presidents and presidential candidates use television, the Internet, and newspapers to promote their policies and themselves, even as they are sometimes manipulated by the media they so avidly seek. Looking at White House media strategies relating to the Iraq War and occupation, health care reform, tax and budget debates, the debate over Bush's competence, the Clinton-Lewinsky sex scandal, and the early battles of the 2008 presidential election, media scholar and former journalist Stephen Farnsworth examines how presidents shift the direction and limit the amount of public debate over policies to favor themselves-and how reporters and Internet commentators often help them do so. The result short-circuits the public's role in evaluating competing visions for the country's future and the legislative branch's role in policy making. The modern presidential obsession with public relations-and media willingness to be used to advance executive power-undermine the country's long term ability to deal with crucial problems, including foreign and military relations, a growing government debt, and public health care shortcomings.