No Friends but the Mountains

Dispatches from the World's Violent Highlands

Author: Judith Matloff

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465097898

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 4413

A veteran war correspondent journeys to remote mountain communities across the globe-from Albania and Chechnya to Nepal and Colombia-to investigate why so many conflicts occur at great heights Mountainous regions are home to only ten percent of the world's population yet host a strikingly disproportionate share of the world's conflicts. Mountains provide a natural refuge for those who want to elude authority, and their remoteness has allowed archaic practices to persist well into our globalized era. As Judith Matloff shows, the result is a combustible mix we in the lowlands cannot afford to ignore. Traveling to conflict zones across the world, she introduces us to Albanian teenagers involved in ancient blood feuds; Mexican peasants hunting down violent poppy growers; and Jihadists who have resisted the Russian military for decades. At every stop, Matloff reminds us that the drugs, terrorism, and instability cascading down the mountainside affect us all. A work of political travel writing in the vein of Ryszard Kapuscinski and Robert Kaplan, No Friends but the Mountains is an indelible portrait of the conflicts that have unexpectedly shaped our world.

No Friends But the Mountains

The Tragic History of the Kurds

Author: John Bulloch,Harvey Morris

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: N.A

Category: Psychology

Page: 242

View: 6741

A comprehensive history of the Kurdish people discusses the origin of the Kurds, reasons for present division among the Kurds, and a report on the Gulf War and its aftermath. By the author of The Gulf War.

Mountain Gloom and Mountain Glory

The Development of the Aesthetics of the Infinite

Author: Marjorie Hope Nicolson

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 9780295975771

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 403

View: 4135

To English poets and writers of the seventeenth century, as to their predecessors, mountains were ugly protuberances which disfigured nature and threatened the symmetry of earth; they were symbols God’s wrath. Yet, less than two centuries later the romantic poets sang in praise of mountain splendor, of glorious heights that stirred their souls to divine ecstasy. In this very readable and fascinating study, Marjorie Hope Nicolson considers the intellectual renaissance at the close of the seventeenth century that caused the shift from mountain gloom to mountain glory. She examines various writers from the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries and traces both the causes and the process of this drastic change in perception.

The War Is in the Mountains

Author: Judith Matloff

Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic

ISBN: 9780715652718

Category: Insurgency

Page: 272

View: 1365

Mountainous regions are home to only ten percent of the world 's population yet host a strikingly disproportionate share of the world 's conflicts. Mountains provide a natural refuge for those who want to elude authority, and their remoteness has allowed archaic practices to persist well into our globalized era. As Judith Matloff shows, the result is a combustible mix those in the lowlands cannot afford to ignore. Travelling to conflict zones across the world, she introduces us to Albanian teenagers involved in ancient blood feuds; Mexican peasants hunting down violent poppy growers; and Jihadists who have resisted the Russian military for decades. At every stop, Matloff reminds us that the drugs, terrorism, and instability cascading down the mountainside affect us all. A work of political travel writing in the vein of Ryszard Kapuscinski and Robert Kaplan, The War is in the Mountains is an indelible portrait of the conflicts that have unexpectedly shaped our world.

No Friend But the Mountains

Writing from Manus Prison

Author: Behrouz Boochani

Publisher: Picador Australia

ISBN: 1760780855

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 300

View: 8900

Where have I come from? From the land of rivers, the land of waterfalls, the land of ancient chants, the land of mountains... In 2013, Kurdish journalist Behrouz Boochani was illegally detained on Manus Island. He has been there ever since. People would run to the mountains to escape the warplanes and found asylum within their chestnut forests... This book is the result. Laboriously tapped out on a mobile phone and translated from the Farsi. It is a voice of witness, an act of survival. A lyric first-hand account. A cry of resistance. A vivid portrait through five years of incarceration and exile. Do Kurds have any friends other than the mountains? PRAISE FOR NO FRIEND BUT THE MOUNTAINS "A chant, a cry from the heart, a lament, fuelled by a fierce urgency, written with the lyricism of a poet, the literary skills of a novelist, and the profound insights of an astute observer of human behaviour and the ruthless politics of a cruel and unjust imprisonment." Arnold Zable, author of the award-winning Jewels and Ashes and Cafe Scheherazade "In the absence of images, turn to this book to fathom what we have done, what we continue to do. It is, put simply, the most extraordinary and important book I have ever read." Good Reading Magazine (starred review) "Not for the faint-hearted, it's a powerful, devastating insight into a situation that's so often seen through a political - not personal - lens." GQ Australia "It is an unforgettable account of man's inhumanity to man that reads like something out of Orwell or Kafka, and is aptly described by Tofighian as 'horrific surrealism'. It is clear from Boochani's writing that he is a highly educated and philosophical man; he segues effortlessly between prose and poetry, both equally powerful." -The Australian Financial Review Magazine "Behrouz Boochani has written a book which is as powerful as it is poetic and moving. He describes his experience of living in a refugee prison with profound insight and intelligence." Queensland Reviewers Collective

Mountain Geography

Physical and Human Dimensions

Author: Martin F. Price,Alton C. Byers,Donald A. Friend,Thomas Kohler,Larry W. Price

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520956974

Category: Science

Page: 396

View: 1298

Mountains cover a quarter of the Earth’s land surface and a quarter of the global population lives in or adjacent to these areas. The global importance of mountains is recognized particularly because they provide critical resources, such as water, food and wood; contain high levels of biological and cultural diversity; and are often places for tourism and recreation and/or of sacred significance. This major revision of Larry Price’s book Mountains and Man (1981) is both timely and highly appropriate. The past three decades have been a period of remarkable progress in our understanding of mountains from an academic point of view. Of even greater importance is that society at large now realizes that mountains and the people who reside in them are not isolated from the mainstream of world affairs, but are vital if we are to achieve an environmentally sustainable future. Mountain Geography is a comprehensive resource that gives readers an in-depth understanding of the geographical processes occurring in the world’s mountains and the overall impact of these regions on culture and society as a whole. The volume begins with an introduction to how mountains are defined, followed by a comprehensive treatment of their physical geography: origins, climatology, snow and ice, landforms and geomorphic processes, soils, vegetation, and wildlife. The concluding chapters provide an introduction to the human geography of mountains: attitudes toward mountains, people living in mountain regions and their livelihoods and interactions within dynamic environments, the diverse types of mountain agriculture, and the challenges of sustainable mountain development.

Nature's Altars

Mountains, Gender, and American Environmentalism

Author: Susan R. Schrepfer

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Nature

Page: 316

View: 9529

"Schrepfer follows men like John Muir, Wilderness Society cofounder Robert Marshall, and the Sierra Club's own David Brower into the mountains - and finds them frequently in the company of women. She tells how mountaineering women shaped their lives through high adventure well before the twentieth century, participating in Appalachian mountain clubs and joining men as "Mazamas" - mountain goats - scaling Oregon's Mount Hood."--BOOK JACKET.

Doing Math in Morning Meeting

150 Quick Activities That Connect to Your Curriculum

Author: Andy Dousis,Margaret Berry Wilson

Publisher: Center for Responsive Schools, Inc.

ISBN: 1892989379

Category: Education

Page: 221

View: 8820

Bring joy and energy to math learning without adding to your already-packed schedule! Here are 150 fun and engaging math activities suitable for kindergartners to 5th graders, with math-themed ideas for all four Morning Meeting components: greeting, group activity, sharing, and morning message. Use these games, songs, chants, hands-on experiments, and more to inspire students' interest in math and help them practice skills. Each activity includes easy how-to steps; relevant NCTM content and process standards; specific math skills addressed; materials needed (all require few or no materials); tips on preparing students for success; math vocabulary to emphasize; and variations and extensions.

The Longest War

The Enduring Conflict Between America and Al-Qaeda

Author: Peter L. Bergen

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0743278941

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 8548

A forefront expert on al Qaeda draws on his unique first-hand interviews with Osama bin Laden, top-level jihadists and Washington officials to offer insight into the war on terror from both sides. By the author of The Osama bin Laden I Know. Reprint.

A Bright Shining Lie

John Paul Vann and America in Vietnam

Author: Neil Sheehan

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780679603801

Category: History

Page: 896

View: 6934

Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best nonfiction books of all time In this magisterial book, a monument of history and biography that was awarded the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize for nonfiction, renowned journalist Neil Sheehan tells the story of Lieutenant Colonel John Paul Vann–"the one irreplaceable American in Vietnam"–and of the tragedy that destroyed that country and the lives of so many Americans. Outspoken and fearless, John Paul Vann arrived in Vietnam in 1962, full of confidence in America's might and right to prevail. A Bright Shining Lie reveals the truth about the war in Vietnam as it unfolded before Vann's eyes: the arrogance and professional corruption of the U.S. military system of the 1960s, the incompetence and venality of the South Vietnamese army, the nightmare of death and destruction that began with the arrival of the American forces. Witnessing the arrogance and self-deception firsthand, Vann put his life and career on the line in an attempt to convince his superiors that the war should be fought another way. But by the time he died in 1972, Vann had embraced the follies he once decried. He went to his grave believing that the war had been won. A haunting and critically acclaimed masterpiece, A Bright Shining Lie is a timeless account of the American experience in Vietnam–a work that is epic in scope, piercing in detail, and told with the keen understanding of a journalist who was actually there. Neil Sheehan' s classic serves as a stunning revelation for all who thought they understood the war. From the Hardcover edition.

Songs of the Baka and Other Discoveries

Travels after Sixty-Five

Author: Dennis James

Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.

ISBN: 1510713522

Category: Travel

Page: 240

View: 7168

Abandoning the comfort and security of a typical retirement, a couple travels and treks through the most isolated parts of the world. After their retirement, Dennis James and Barbara Grossman decide to travel where tour buses won’t and where the US government says “don’t,” incorporating trekking into their travels as a way to see untouched areas of the world considered inhospitable by many. Armed with a passport, an interest in non-Western and indigenous cultures, a spirit for adventure, and a sense of humor, they hike through the forests in the highlands of Papua New Guinea; visit the traditional hunter-gatherer Baka Pygmy community in Cameroon; stay with the cliff-dwelling Dogon people in Mali; explore Roman ruins in Algeria; meet a nervous mother rhino in Nepal; and witness bull-jumping, a coming-of-age ritual for young Hamer men in Ethiopia. In defiance of typical tourist travel, ignoring State Department warnings, and with a curiosity and hardiness that belies their ages, Dennis and Barbara choose to travel the roads not taken so frequently—to places like Cuba, Iran, Venezuela, and Gaza—seeking the truth behind the headlines and exploring the deeper questions about the local cultures they encounter. Why do these people cling to the art, sexual mores, economic and political hierarchies, and spiritualities that govern their lives? And how and why do they remain resistant to the pressures of globalization? A journey into the other sides of the world, Songs of the Baka and Other Discoveries puts aside preconceptions and combines the wisdom of age with the stamina of youth.

March 1917: On the Brink of War and Revolution

Author: Will Englund

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393292096

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 7662

“Fast-paced history . . . full of haunting, unforgettable wartime images.” —David M. Shribman, Boston Globe March 1917 is a riveting history of the month that transformed the world’s greatest nations as Russia faced revolution and America entered World War I. Drawing on a wealth of contemporary Russian and American diaries, memoirs, oral histories, and newspaper accounts, Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Will Englund creates a highly detailed and textured account of America’s transformation from an isolationist nation to one that embraced an active role in shaping world affairs while at home Jim Crow still reigned. This fascinating examination considers the dreams of that year’s warriors, pacifists, activists, revolutionaries, and reactionaries—from Czar Nicholas II to Woodrow Wilson, from Theodore Roosevelt to the fiery congresswoman Jeannette Rankin—and demonstrates how their successes and failures constitute the origin story of our complex modern world.

God's Middle Finger

Into the Lawless Heart of the Sierra Madre

Author: Richard Grant

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 141656571X

Category: Travel

Page: 304

View: 2734

Twenty miles south of the Arizona-Mexico border, the rugged, beautiful Sierra Madre mountains begin their dramatic ascent. Almost 900 miles long, the range climbs to nearly 11,000 feet and boasts several canyons deeper than the Grand Canyon. The rules of law and society have never taken hold in the Sierra Madre, which is home to bandits, drug smugglers, Mormons, cave-dwelling Tarahumara Indians, opium farmers, cowboys, and other assorted outcasts. Outsiders are not welcome; drugs are the primary source of income; murder is all but a regional pastime. The Mexican army occasionally goes in to burn marijuana and opium crops -- the modern treasure of the Sierra Madre -- but otherwise the government stays away. In its stead are the drug lords, who have made it one of the biggest drug-producing areas in the world. Fifteen years ago, journalist Richard Grant developed what he calls "an unfortunate fascination" with this lawless place. Locals warned that he would meet his death there, but he didn't believe them -- until his last trip. During his travels Grant visited a folk healer for his insomnia and was prescribed rattlesnake pills, attended bizarre religious rituals, consorted with cocaine-snorting policemen, taught English to Guarijio Indians, and dug for buried treasure. On his last visit, his reckless adventure spiraled into his own personal heart of darkness when cocaine-fueled Mexican hillbillies hunted him through the woods all night, bent on killing him for sport. With gorgeous detail, fascinating insight, and an undercurrent of dark humor, God's Middle Finger brings to vivid life a truly unique and uncharted world.

Moon Alaska

Author: Lisa Maloney

Publisher: Moon Travel

ISBN: 1631214977

Category: Travel

Page: 450

View: 2437

Moon Travel Guides: Make Your Escape! Remote, wild, and all-around otherworldly, Alaska promises unforgettable adventure. Discover the heart of "The Last Frontier" with Moon Alaska. What you'll find in Moon Alaska: Strategic itineraries for every budget and timeline, whether you have a week to hit the top sights or a month to explore the whole state Full-color photos and detailed maps throughout, plus a full-color foldout map Curated advice for outdoor adventurers, history buffs, culture mavens, road-trippers, wildlife enthusiasts, and more Must-see attractions and off-beat ideas for making the most of your trip: Embark on a guided active glacier hike, explore ice caves, or take an intrepid "flightseeing" tour to secluded glacier landings in Denali National Park. Experience the thrill of spotting wild bears, moose, or even walrus, or catch a glimpse of sea otters and humpback whales on a boat tour of the spectacular Kenai Fjords. Hike through lush wilderness or along pristine beaches, kayak on tranquil sounds or secluded lakes, or camp under the crystal-clear stars. Learn about Alaska's native cultures and quirky small towns, savor a freshly-caught seafood dinner, and discover the best spots to witness the enchanting northern lights Honest advice from Anchorage local and outdoor aficionado Lisa Maloney on when to go, what to pack, and where to stay, from campsites and hostels to B&Bs and resort fishing lodges How to get there and get around by plane, train, ferry, cruise ship, or guided tour Recommendations for families, LGBTQ+ travelers, seniors, international visitors, and travelers with disabilities Thorough background on the culture, weather, wildlife, local laws, history, and health and safety With Moon Alaska's local insight, myriad activities, and expert advice, you can plan your trip your way. Full list of coverage: Juneau and Southeast Alaska, Anchorage and Southcentral Alaska, Denali, Fairbanks, and the Interior, Kodiak and Southwest Alaska, the Arctic Can't get enough of Alaska? Try Moon Anchorage, Denali & the Kenai Peninsula. Headed to Canada? Try Moon Vancouver & Canadian Rockies Road Trip or Moon Banff National Park.

The Postmistress

Author: Sarah Blake

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101185254

Category: Fiction

Page: 384

View: 5857

The New York Times bestseller- "A beautifully written, thought-provoking novel." -#1 New York Times bestselling author Kathryn Stockett. In 1940, Iris James is the postmistress in coastal Franklin, Massachusetts. Iris knows more about the townspeople than she will ever say, and believes her job is to deliver secrets. Yet one day she does the unthinkable: slips a letter into her pocket, reads it, and doesn't deliver it. Meanwhile, Frankie Bard broadcasts from overseas with Edward R. Murrow. Her dispatches beg listeners to pay heed as the Nazis bomb London nightly. Most of the townspeople of Franklin think the war can't touch them. But both Iris and Frankie know better... The Postmistress is a tale of two worlds-one shattered by violence, the other willfully naïve-and of two women whose job is to deliver the news, yet who find themselves unable to do so. Through their eyes, and the eyes of everyday people caught in history's tide, it examines how stories are told, and how the fact of war is borne even through everyday life. Watch a Video

Seven Steps from Snowdon to Everest

A Hill Walker's Journey to the Top of the World

Author: Mark Horrell

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780993413025

Category: Mountaineering

Page: 410

View: 6358

Mark had been an ordinary hiker who had only read books about mountaineering. When he signed up for an organised trek in Nepal with a group of elderly ladies, little did he know that ten years later he would be attempting to climb the world's highest mountain. A refreshingly honest portrait of the joys and torments of a modern-day Everest climber.

Hillbilly Elegy

A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis

Author: J. D. Vance

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062872257

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 8362

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER, NAMED BY THE TIMES AS ONE OF "6 BOOKS TO HELP UNDERSTAND TRUMP'S WIN" AND SOON TO BE A MAJOR-MOTION PICTURE DIRECTED BY RON HOWARD "You will not read a more important book about America this year."—The Economist "A riveting book."—The Wall Street Journal "Essential reading."—David Brooks, New York Times Hillbilly Elegy is a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis—that of white working-class Americans. The disintegration of this group, a process that has been slowly occurring now for more than forty years, has been reported with growing frequency and alarm, but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck. The Vance family story begins hopefully in postwar America. J. D.’s grandparents were “dirt poor and in love,” and moved north from Kentucky’s Appalachia region to Ohio in the hopes of escaping the dreadful poverty around them. They raised a middle-class family, and eventually one of their grandchildren would graduate from Yale Law School, a conventional marker of success in achieving generational upward mobility. But as the family saga of Hillbilly Elegy plays out, we learn that J.D.'s grandparents, aunt, uncle, sister, and, most of all, his mother struggled profoundly with the demands of their new middle-class life, never fully escaping the legacy of abuse, alcoholism, poverty, and trauma so characteristic of their part of America. With piercing honesty, Vance shows how he himself still carries around the demons of his chaotic family history. A deeply moving memoir, with its share of humor and vividly colorful figures, Hillbilly Elegy is the story of how upward mobility really feels. And it is an urgent and troubling meditation on the loss of the American dream for a large segment of this country.

Knowing God Through Prayer

Learn to Pray with the Men and Women of the Bible

Author: Jim George

Publisher: Harvest House Publishers

ISBN: 0736970584

Category: Religion

Page: 240

View: 7037

Pray Like the People Who Knew God Best We could all benefit from some guidance on how to pray with more fervor and faithfulness. And there are no better prayer mentors than the men and women of the Bible who talked with God and touched His heart. Join bestselling author Jim George as he shares the keys to meaningful communion with God. As you explore various prayers in Scripture, you'll discover how to... build trust in God while you face diverse trials and temptations find courage in challenges that are beyond your abilities worship with joy in life's most unexpected circumstances Experience a deeper intimacy with God and give new life to your prayers as you find clear direction on how to pray God's way in all of life's hardships and blessings.

The White Darkness

Author: David Grann

Publisher: Doubleday

ISBN: 0385544588

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 4914

By the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Killers of the Flower Moon, a powerful true story of adventure and obsession in the Antarctic, lavishly illustrated with color photographs Henry Worsley was a devoted husband and father and a decorated British special forces officer who believed in honor and sacrifice. He was also a man obsessed. He spent his life idolizing Ernest Shackleton, the nineteenth-century polar explorer, who tried to become the first person to reach the South Pole, and later sought to cross Antarctica on foot. Shackleton never completed his journeys, but he repeatedly rescued his men from certain death, and emerged as one of the greatest leaders in history. Worsley felt an overpowering connection to those expeditions. He was related to one of Shackleton's men, Frank Worsley, and spent a fortune collecting artifacts from their epic treks across the continent. He modeled his military command on Shackleton's legendary skills and was determined to measure his own powers of endurance against them. He would succeed where Shackleton had failed, in the most brutal landscape in the world. In 2008, Worsley set out across Antarctica with two other descendants of Shackleton's crew, battling the freezing, desolate landscape, life-threatening physical exhaustion, and hidden crevasses. Yet when he returned home he felt compelled to go back. On November 13, 2015, at age 55, Worsley bid farewell to his family and embarked on his most perilous quest: to walk across Antarctica alone. David Grann tells Worsley's remarkable story with the intensity and power that have led him to be called "simply the best narrative nonfiction writer working today." Illustrated with more than fifty stunning photographs from Worsley's and Shackleton's journeys, The White Darkness is both a gorgeous keepsake volume and a spellbinding story of courage, love, and a man pushing himself to the extremes of human capacity.