Not in My Neighborhood

How Bigotry Shaped a Great American City

Author: N.A

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781566639002

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 4182

Not in My Neighborhood

How Bigotry Shaped a Great American City

Author: Antero Pietila

Publisher: Ivan R. Dee

ISBN: 1566639638

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 2720

Eugenics, racial thinking, and white supremacist attitudes influenced even the federal government's actions toward housing in the 20th century, dooming American cities to ghettoization. The Federal Housing Administration continued discriminatory housing policies even into the 1960s, long after civil rights legislation. This all-American tale is told through the prism of Baltimore, from its early suburbanization in the 1880s to the consequences of white flight after World War II, and into the first decade of the twenty-first century. The events are real, and so are the heroes and villains. Mr. Pietila's narrative centers on the human side of residential real estate practices, whose discriminatory tools were the same everywhere: restrictive covenants, redlining, blockbusting, predatory lending.

Animals in My Neighborhood

The Story of Roy the Rooster

Author: Philip L. Houston

Publisher: LifeRich Publishing

ISBN: 1489705317

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 32

View: 2666

The book is based on true events. Roy the Rooster, who appeared in a suburban neighborhood and played cat and mouse with the people of the neighborhood for over six weeks, stars in this story. Follow the zany antics of this lonely rooster who only wants to fit in with city folks that can’t get used to his early morning cock-a-doodle-doing. Can the neighborhood folks and this naughty bird be friends in the end? Read his story to find out!

My Neighborhood

Places and Faces

Author: Lisa Bullard,Brandon Reibeling

Publisher: Capstone

ISBN: 9781404801622

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 24

View: 8616

"Libbie gives a tour of her neighborhood to a boy just about her age whose family is moving in next door. By highlighting neighborhood safety and activities, Libby makes the boy feel welcome."

Not in My Family

AIDS in the African-American Community

Author: Gil L. Robertson

Publisher: Agate Publishing

ISBN: 1572846216

Category: Social Science

Page: 300

View: 6754

In this landmark collection of personal essays, stories, brief memoirs, and polemics, a broad swath of black Americans unite to bear witness to the devastation AIDS has wrought on their community. Not in My Family marks a new willingness on the part of black Americans—whether prominent figures from the worlds of politics, entertainment, or sports, or just ordinary folks with extraordinary stories — to face the scourge that has affected them disproportionately for years. Editor Gil Robertson has enlisted a remarkable group of contributors, including performers like Patti LaBelle, Mo’Nique, and Hill Harper; bestselling authors like Randall Robinson and Omar Tyree; political leaders like Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. and former U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Joycelyn Elders; religious leaders like Rev. Calvin Butts, and many, many more.

Blockbusting in Baltimore

The Edmondson Village Story

Author: W. Edward Orser

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813148316

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 8708

This innovative study of racial upheaval and urban transformation in Baltimore, Maryland investigates the impact of "blockbusting" -- a practice in which real estate agents would sell a house on an all-white block to an African American family with the aim of igniting a panic among the other residents. These homeowners would often sell at a loss to move away, and the real estate agents would promote the properties at a drastic markup to African American buyers. In this groundbreaking book, W. Edward Orser examines Edmondson Village, a west Baltimore rowhouse community where an especially acute instance of blockbusting triggered white flight and racial change on a dramatic scale. Between 1955 and 1965, nearly twenty thousand white residents, who saw their secure world changing drastically, were replaced by blacks in search of the American dream. By buying low and selling high, playing on the fears of whites and the needs of African Americans, blockbusters set off a series of events that Orser calls "a collective trauma whose significance for recent American social and cultural history is still insufficiently appreciated and understood." Blockbusting in Baltimore describes a widely experienced but little analyzed phenomenon of recent social history. Orser makes an important contribution to community and urban studies, race relations, and records of the African American experience.

Black Baltimore

A New Theory of Community

Author: Harold Mcdougall

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 1566391938

Category: History

Page: 334

View: 9565

Through extensive neighborhood interviews and a compelling assessment of the problems of unraveling communities in urban America, Harold McDougall reveals how, in sections of Baltimore, a "New Community" is developing. Relying more on vernacular culture, personal networking, and mutual support than on private wealth or public subsidy, the communities of black Baltimore provide an example of self-help and civic action that could and should be occurring in other inner-city areas. In this political history of Old West Baltimore, McDougall describes how "base communities"—small peer groups that share similar views, circumstances, and objectives—have helped neighborhoods respond to the failure of both government and the market to create conditions for a decent quality of life for all. Arguing for the primacy of church leadership within the black community, the author describes how these small, flexible groups are creating the foundation of what he calls a New Community, where community-spirited organizers, clergy, public interest advocates, business people, and government workers interact and build relationships through which Baltimore's urban agenda is being developed.

Not in My Town

Exposing and Ending Human Trafficking and Modern-day Slavery

Author: Dillon Burroughs,Charles Powell

Publisher: New Hope Publishers (AL)

ISBN: 9781596693012

Category: Human trafficking

Page: 190

View: 7036

Though illegal in most every country of the world, forms of slavery continue in nearly every country of the world-- including the United States. This book will help you discover an awareness of trafficking withing America's borders, and help you find specific ways to speak out and stand against trafficking worldwide by taking action here in the United States.

Transportation in My Neighborhood

Author: Shelly Lyons

Publisher: Capstone

ISBN: 1620651017

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 24

View: 9971

Presents information about the forms of transportation in a neighborhood, including bicycles, cars, buses, trains, and ferries.

Baltimore '68

Riots and Rebirth in an American City

Author: Jessica Elfenbein,Thomas Hollowak,Elizabeth Nix

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 1439906629

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 1027

In 1968, Baltimore was home to a variety of ethnic, religious, and racial communities that, like those in other American cities, were confronting a quickly declining industrial base. In April of that year, disturbances broke the urban landscape along lines of race and class. This book offers chapters on events leading up to the turmoil, the riots, and the aftermath as well as four rigorously edited and annotated oral histories of members of the Baltimore community. The combination of new scholarship and first-person accounts provides a comprehensive case study of this period of civil unrest four decades later. This engaging, broad-based public history lays bare the diverse experiences of 1968 and their effects, emphasizing the role of specific human actions. By reflecting on the stories and analysis presented in this anthology, readers may feel empowered to pursue informed, responsible civic action of their own. Baltimore '68 is the book component of a larger public history project, "Baltimore '68 Riots: Riots and Rebirth." The project's companion website (http://archives.ubalt.edu/bsr/index.html ) offers many more oral histories plus photos, art, and links to archival sources. The book and the website together make up an invaluable teaching resource on cities, social unrest, and racial politics in the 1960s. The project was the corecipient of the 2009 Outstanding Public History Project Award from the National Council on Public History.

Family Properties

Race, Real Estate, and the Exploitation of Black Urban America

Author: Beryl Satter

Publisher: Metropolitan Books

ISBN: 9781429952606

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 9526

Part family story and part urban history, a landmark investigation of segregation and urban decay in Chicago -- and cities across the nation The "promised land" for thousands of Southern blacks, postwar Chicago quickly became the most segregated city in the North, the site of the nation's worst ghettos and the target of Martin Luther King Jr.'s first campaign beyond the South. In this powerful book, Beryl Satter identifies the true causes of the city's black slums and the ruin of urban neighborhoods throughout the country: not, as some have argued, black pathology, the culture of poverty, or white flight, but a widespread and institutionalized system of legal and financial exploitation. In Satter's riveting account of a city in crisis, unscrupulous lawyers, slumlords, and speculators are pitched against religious reformers, community organizers, and an impassioned attorney who launched a crusade against the profiteers—the author's father, Mark J. Satter. At the heart of the struggle stand the black migrants who, having left the South with its legacy of sharecropping, suddenly find themselves caught in a new kind of debt peonage. Satter shows the interlocking forces at work in their oppression: the discriminatory practices of the banking industry; the federal policies that created the country's shameful "dual housing market"; the economic anxieties that fueled white violence; and the tempting profits to be made by preying on the city's most vulnerable population. Family Properties: Race, Real Estate, and the Exploitation of Black Urban America is a monumental work of history, this tale of racism and real estate, politics and finance, will forever change our understanding of the forces that transformed urban America. "Gripping . . . This painstaking portrayal of the human costs of financial racism is the most important book yet written on the black freedom struggle in the urban North."—David Garrow, The Washington Post

The Corner

A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood

Author: David Simon,Edward Burns

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 0307833461

Category: Social Science

Page: 576

View: 4103

The crime-infested intersection of West Fayette and Monroe Streets is well-known--and cautiously avoided--by most of Baltimore. But this notorious corner's 24-hour open-air drug market provides the economic fuel for a dying neighborhood. David Simon, an award-winning author and crime reporter, and Edward Burns, a 20-year veteran of the urban drug war, tell the chilling story of this desolate crossroad. Through the eyes of one broken family--two drug-addicted adults and their smart, vulnerable 15-year-old son, DeAndre McCollough, Simon and Burns examine the sinister realities of inner cities across the country and unflinchingly assess why law enforcement policies, moral crusades, and the welfare system have accomplished so little. This extraordinary book is a crucial look at the price of the drug culture and the poignant scenes of hope, caring, and love that astonishingly rise in the midst of a place America has abandoned.

In the Neighborhood

The Search for Community on an American Street, One Sleepover at a Time

Author: Peter Lovenheim

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101186671

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 6581

Based on a popular New York Times Op-Ed piece, this is the quirky, heartfelt account of one man's quest to meet his neighbors--and find a sense of community. **As seen in Parade, USA Today, The Washington Post, The Chicago Sun-Times, and more. **Winner of the Zocalo Square Book Prize, and recently named a first selection by Action Book Club. "It's impossible to read this book without feeling the urge to knock on neighbors' doors." -Chicago Sun-Times Journalist and author Peter Lovenheim lived on the same street in suburban Rochester, NY, most of his life. But it was only after a brutal murder-suicide rocked the community that he was struck by a fact of modern life in this comfortable enclave: No one knew anyone else. Thus begins Peter's search to meet and get to know his neighbors. An inquisitive person, he does more than just introduce himself. He asks, ever so politely, if he can sleep over. In this smart, engaging, and deeply felt book, Lovenheim takes readers inside the homes, minds, and hearts of his neighbors and asks a thought-provoking question: Do neighborhoods matter--and is something lost when we live among strangers?

Great American City

Chicago and the Enduring Neighborhood Effect

Author: Robert J. Sampson

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226734560

Category: Political Science

Page: 534

View: 5367

To demonstrate the powerfully enduring effect of place, this text reviews a decade of research in Chicago, to demonstrate how neighborhoods influence social phenomena, including crime, health, civic engagement & altruism.

Signs in My Neighborhood

Author: Shelly Lyons,Phd Gail Saunders-Smith

Publisher: Capstone

ISBN: 1620650983

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 24

View: 5572

Presents information about signs in a neighborhood, including traffic lights and street signs.

The Divided City

Poverty and Prosperity in Urban America

Author: Alan Mallach

Publisher: Island Press

ISBN: 1610917812

Category: Architecture

Page: 343

View: 7604

In The Divided City, urban practitioner and scholar Alan Mallach presents a detailed picture of what has happened over the past 15 to 20 years in industrial cities like Pittsburgh and Baltimore, as they have undergone unprecedented, unexpected revival. He spotlights these changes while placing them in their larger economic, social and political context. Most importantly, he explores the pervasive significance of race in American cities, and looks closely at the successes and failures of city governments, nonprofit entities, and citizens as they have tried to address the challenges of change. The Divided City concludes with strategies to foster greater equality and opportunity, firmly grounding them in the cities' economic and political realities.

On Middle Ground

A History of the Jews of Baltimore

Author: Eric L. Goldstein,Deborah R. Weiner

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421424525

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 7113

In 1938, Gustav Brunn and his family fled Nazi Germany and settled in Baltimore. Brunn found a job at McCormick’s Spice Company but was fired after three days when, according to family legend, the manager discovered he was Jewish. He started his own successful business using a spice mill he brought over from Germany and developed a blend especially for the seafood purveyors across the street. Before long, his Old Bay spice blend would grace kitchen cabinets in virtually every home in Maryland. The Brunns sold the business in 1986. Four years later, Old Bay was again sold—to McCormick. In On Middle Ground, the first truly comprehensive history of Baltimore’s Jewish community, Eric L. Goldstein and Deborah R. Weiner describe not only the formal institutions of Jewish life but also the everyday experiences of families like the Brunns and of a diverse Jewish population that included immigrants and natives, factory workers and department store owners, traditionalists and reformers. The story of Baltimore Jews—full of absorbing characters and marked by dramas of immigration, acculturation, and assimilation—is the story of American Jews in microcosm. But its contours also reflect the city’s unique culture. Goldstein and Weiner argue that Baltimore’s distinctive setting as both a border city and an immigrant port offered opportunities for advancement that made it a magnet for successive waves of Jewish settlers. The authors detail how the city began to attract enterprising merchants during the American Revolution, when it thrived as one of the few ports remaining free of British blockade. They trace Baltimore’s meteoric rise as a commercial center, which drew Jewish newcomers who helped the upstart town surpass Philadelphia as the second-largest American city. They explore the important role of Jewish entrepreneurs as Baltimore became a commercial gateway to the South and later developed a thriving industrial scene. Readers learn how, in the twentieth century, the growth of suburbia and the redevelopment of downtown offered scope to civic leaders, business owners, and real estate developers. From symphony benefactor Joseph Meyerhoff to Governor Marvin Mandel and trailblazing state senator Rosalie Abrams, Jews joined the ranks of Baltimore’s most influential cultural, philanthropic, and political leaders while working on the grassroots level to reshape a metro area confronted with the challenges of modern urban life. Accessibly written and enriched by more than 130 illustrations, On Middle Ground reveals that local Jewish life was profoundly shaped by Baltimore’s "middleness"—its hybrid identity as a meeting point between North and South, a major industrial center with a legacy of slavery, and a large city with a small-town feel.

Lost Baltimore

Author: Gregory J. Alexander,Paul Kelsey Williams

Publisher: Pavilion Books, Limited

ISBN: 9781909108431

Category: Architecture

Page: 142

View: 880

Profiles places in Baltimore that have been destroyed, altered, or demolished during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with photographs of the original structures, background information, and stories about memorable individuals.

Why Not in My Backyard?

Neighborhood Impacts of Deconcentrating Assisted Housing

Author: George C. Galster

Publisher: Rutgers Univ Center for Urban

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 226

View: 1756

Policymakers who wish to deconcentrate assisted housing for low-income and special-needs households into areas where these households are underrepresented are at odds with citizens who wish to keep such housing out of their neighborhoods. One side sees the expanded opportunities and quality of life for residents. The other side sees an invasion of undesirable neighbors who will undermine their quality of life, security, and property values. In Baltimore County and Denver, jurisdictions that differ in many respects, innovative efforts during the tail end of the twentieth century to spatially deconcentrate assisted households of various types met with vocal, well-organized community opposition in both locales. In Denver, scattered-site public housing and the supportive housing for special needs populations programs were targeted. In Baltimore County, the Section 8 Moving to Opportunity rental assistance program proved a lightning rod for protest. The authors seize the analytical opportunity provided by these programs in Denver and Baltimore County to explore fundamental issues concerning the deconcentration of assisted housing. Does assisted housing of various types cause negative neighborhood impacts? Do impacts vary across different sorts of neighborhoods? How does the spatial concentration of assisted housing or the scale of the facility affect impacts? What are the mechanisms through which these impacts transpire? How can deconcentration policies be revised to minimize any negative impacts? This book provides answers to these questions by bringing to bear a variety of qualitative and quantitative research methods.

The Death and Life of Great American Cities

Author: Jane Jacobs

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 052543285X

Category: Social Science

Page: 480

View: 1870

Thirty years after its publication, The Death and Life of Great American Cities was described by The New York Times as "perhaps the most influential single work in the history of town planning....[It] can also be seen in a much larger context. It is first of all a work of literature; the descriptions of street life as a kind of ballet and the bitingly satiric account of traditional planning theory can still be read for pleasure even by those who long ago absorbed and appropriated the book's arguments." Jane Jacobs, an editor and writer on architecture in New York City in the early sixties, argued that urban diversity and vitality were being destroyed by powerful architects and city planners. Rigorous, sane, and delightfully epigrammatic, Jacobs's small masterpiece is a blueprint for the humanistic management of cities. It is sensible, knowledgeable, readable, indispensable. The author has written a new foreword for this Modern Library edition.