On the Road of the Winds

An Archaeological History of the Pacific Islands before European Contact, Revised and Expanded Edition

Author: Patrick Vinton Kirch

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520968891

Category: Social Science

Page: 408

View: 9263

The Pacific Ocean covers one-third of the earth’s surface and encompasses many thousands of islands that are home to numerous human societies and cultures. Among these indigenous Oceanic cultures are the intrepid Polynesian double-hulled canoe navigators, the atoll dwellers of Micronesia, the statue carvers of remote Easter Island, and the famed traders of Melanesia. Decades of archaeological excavations—combined with allied research in historical linguistics, biological anthropology, and comparative ethnography—have revealed much new information about the long-term history of these societies and cultures. On the Road of the Winds synthesizes the grand sweep of human history in the Pacific Islands, beginning with the movement of early people out from Asia more than 40,000 years ago and tracing the development of myriad indigenous cultures up to the time of European contact in the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries. This updated edition, enhanced with many new illustrations and an extensive bibliography, synthesizes the latest archaeological, linguistic, and biological discoveries that reveal the vastness of ancient history in the Pacific Islands.

On the Road of the Winds

An Archaeological History of the Pacific Islands Before European Contact, Revised and Expanded Edition

Author: Patrick Vinton Kirch

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520292812

Category: Social Science

Page: 408

View: 5083

The Pacific Ocean covers one-third of the earth's surface and encompasses many thousands of islands, which are home to numerous human societies and cultures. Among these indigenous Oceanic cultures are the intrepid Polynesian double-hulled canoe navigators, the atoll dwellers of Micronesia, the statue carvers of remote Easter Island, and the famed traders of Melanesia. Decades of archaeological excavations, combined with allied research in historical linguistics, biological anthropology, and comparative ethnography, have revealed much new information about the long-term history of these Pacific Island societies and cultures. On the Road of the Winds synthesizes the grand sweep of human history in the Pacific Islands, beginning with the movement of early people out from Asia more than 40,000 years ago, and tracing the development of myriad indigenous cultures up to the time of European contact in the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries. This updated edition, enhanced with many new illustrations and an extensive bibliography, synthesizes the latest archaeological, linguistic, and biological discoveries that reveal the vastness of ancient history in the Pacific Islands.

On the Road of the Winds

An Archaeological History of the Pacific Islands before European Contact

Author: Patrick Vinton Kirch

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520928961

Category: Social Science

Page: 446

View: 9427

The Pacific Ocean covers one-third of the earth's surface and encompasses many thousands of islands, the home to numerous human societies and cultures. Among these indigenous Oceanic cultures are the intrepid Polynesian double-hulled canoe navigators, the atoll dwellers of Micronesia, the statue carvers of remote Easter Island, and the famed traders of Melanesia. Recent archaeological excavations, combined with allied research in historical linguistics, biological anthropology, and comparative ethnography, have begun to reveal much new information about the long-term history of these Pacific Island societies and cultures. On the Road of the Winds synthesizes the grand sweep of human history in the Pacific Islands, beginning with the movement of early people out from Asia more than 40,000 years ago, and tracing the development of myriad indigenous cultures up to the time of European contact in the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries. Questions that scholars have posed and puzzled over for two centuries or more are illuminated here: Where did the Pacific Islanders come from? How did they discover and settle the thousands of islands? Why did they build great monuments like Nan Madol on Pohnpei Island in Micronesia or the famous Easter Island statues? This book provides an up-to-date synthesis of archaeological and historical anthropological knowledge of these fascinating indigenous cultures. In particular, Kirch focuses on human ecology and island adaptations, the complexities of island trading and exchange systems, voyaging technology and skills, and the development of intensive economic systems linked to the growth of large populations. He also draws on his own original field research conducted on many islands, ranging from the Solomons to Hawai'i, as he takes us on an intellectual voyage into the Oceanic past.

A Shark Going Inland Is My Chief

The Island Civilization of Ancient Hawai'i

Author: Patrick Vinton Kirch

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520953835

Category: Social Science

Page: 368

View: 6618

Tracing the origins of the Hawaiians and other Polynesians back to the shores of the South China Sea, archaeologist Patrick Vinton Kirch follows their voyages of discovery across the Pacific in this fascinating history of Hawaiian culture from about one thousand years ago. Combining more than four decades of his own research with Native Hawaiian oral traditions and the evidence of archaeology, Kirch puts a human face on the gradual rise to power of the Hawaiian god-kings, who by the late eighteenth century were locked in a series of wars for ultimate control of the entire archipelago. This lively, accessible chronicle works back from Captain James Cook’s encounter with the pristine kingdom in 1778, when the British explorers encountered an island civilization governed by rulers who could not be gazed upon by common people. Interweaving anecdotes from his own widespread travel and extensive archaeological investigations into the broader historical narrative, Kirch shows how the early Polynesian settlers of Hawai'i adapted to this new island landscape and created highly productive agricultural systems.

How Chiefs Became Kings

Divine Kingship and the Rise of Archaic States in Ancient Hawai'i

Author: Patrick Vinton Kirch

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520947843

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 9198

In How Chiefs Became Kings, Patrick Vinton Kirch addresses a central problem in anthropological archaeology: the emergence of "archaic states" whose distinctive feature was divine kingship. Kirch takes as his focus the Hawaiian archipelago, commonly regarded as the archetype of a complex chiefdom. Integrating anthropology, linguistics, archaeology, traditional history, and theory, and drawing on significant contributions from his own four decades of research, Kirch argues that Hawaiian polities had become states before the time of Captain Cook’s voyage (1778-1779). The status of most archaic states is inferred from the archaeological record. But Kirch shows that because Hawai`i’s kingdoms were established relatively recently, they could be observed and recorded by Cook and other European voyagers. Substantive and provocative, this book makes a major contribution to the literature of precontact Hawai`i and illuminates Hawai`i’s importance in the global theory and literature about divine kingship, archaic states, and sociopolitical evolution.

Contemporary Pacific societies

studies in development and change

Author: Victoria S. Lockwood,Thomas G. Harding,Ben J. Wallace

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 374

View: 9980

Kuaʻāina Kahiko

Life and Land in Ancient Kahikinui, Maui

Author: Patrick Vinton Kirch

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 5146

This is a narrative account of a long-term archaeological research in Maui led by the author and his colleagues. Readers are introduced to the world of ancient Hawaiians who lived in the district of Kahikinui on the western side of Maui. The narrative covers archaeological findings such as dating of found objects and their significances but also the stories of present time Native Hawaiians who have chosen to live in the area in spite of the lack of moderns conveniences.

Ancient Jomon of Japan

Author: Junko Habu

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521776707

Category: History

Page: 332

View: 5267

It will prove invaluable to students and researchers alike."--BOOK JACKET.

Unearthing the Polynesian Past

Explorations and Adventures of an Island Archaeologist

Author: Patrick Vinton Kirch

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780824853457

Category: Archaeologists

Page: 379

View: 4056

A History of the Pacific Islands

Author: Steven R. Fischer

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 1403913757

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 4090

A History of the Pacific Islands traces the human history of nearly one third of the globe over a 50,000-year span, taking the islands of Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia from prehistoric culture to the present day.

Fiji's Natural Heritage

Author: Paddy Ryan

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biology

Page: 288

View: 3451

"Fiji's Natural Heritage" provides an introduction to the flora, fauna and ecology of the Fiji islands. First published in 1988, this new edition has been completely revised, expanded and redesigned. Written for the general reader as well as for the natural history enthusiast, the book provides a comprehensive overview of Fiji's rich biodiversity. The islands have a large number of endemic species. These and the introduced species are illustrated and described with their common, scientific and Fijian names given. Paddy Ryan's text is packed with biological facts and features, as well as many anecdotes detailing encounters with his subjects including the grey reef shark, the crested and the banded iguana, the fiddler crab, the frigate bird, and Fiji's national flower the tagimaucia.

Landscape of the Mind

Human Evolution and the Archaeology of Thought

Author: John F. Hoffecker

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 023151848X

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 8740

In Landscape of the Mind, John F. Hoffecker explores the origin and growth of the human mind, drawing on archaeology, history, and the fossil record. He suggests that, as an indirect result of bipedal locomotion, early humans developed a feedback relationship among their hands, brains, and tools that evolved into the capacity to externalize thoughts in the form of shaped stone objects. When anatomically modern humans evolved a parallel capacity to externalize thoughts as symbolic language, individual brains within social groups became integrated into a "neocortical Internet," or super-brain, giving birth to the mind. Noting that archaeological traces of symbolism coincide with evidence of the ability to generate novel technology, Hoffecker contends that human creativity, as well as higher order consciousness, is a product of the superbrain. He equates the subsequent growth of the mind with human history, which began in Africa more than 50,000 years ago. As anatomically modern humans spread across the globe, adapting to a variety of climates and habitats, they redesigned themselves technologically and created alternative realities through tools, language, and art. Hoffecker connects the rise of civilization to a hierarchical reorganization of the super-brain, triggered by explosive population growth. Subsequent human history reflects to varying degrees the suppression of the mind's creative powers by the rigid hierarchies of nationstates and empires, constraining the further accumulation of knowledge. The modern world emerged after 1200 from the fragments of the Roman Empire, whose collapse had eliminated a central authority that could thwart innovation. Hoffecker concludes with speculation about the possibility of artificial intelligence and the consequences of a mind liberated from its organic antecedents to exist in an independent, nonbiological form.

Pathfinders: A Global History of Exploration

Author: Felipe Fernández-Armesto

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393330915

Category: History

Page: 428

View: 4642

A distinguished scholar traces the history of exploration from a global perspective, following the pathfinders and their expeditions over the course of five millennia to the farthest reaches of the world, from ancient Egypt, through the merchants and missionaries of the Silk Roads, to the discovery of the New World and the nineteenth-century expeditions to Africa, the Arctic, North America, and the South Pacific. Reprint.

The Lapita Peoples

Ancestors of the Oceanic World

Author: Patrick Vinton Kirch

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9781577180364

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 6464

This is the first account of the Lapita peoples, the common ancestor of the Polynesians, Micronesians, and Austronesian-speaking Melanesians who over the last 4000 years colonized the islands of the Pacific, including New Zealand and territories as far afield as Fiji and Hawaii. Its purpose is to provide answers to some of the most puzzling archaeological and anthropological questions: who were the Lapita peoples? what was their history? how were they able to travel such great distances? and why did they do so? Recent discoveries (several by the author of this book) have begun at last to yield a coherent picture of these elusive peoples. Professor Kirch takes the reader back many thousands of years to the earliest evidence of the Lapita peoples. He describes the research itself and conveys the excitement of the first discoveries of Lapita settlements, tools and pottery. He then traces the remarkable cultural development and spread of the Lapita peoples across the unoccupied islands of Eastern Melanesia, Micronesia and Western Polynesia. He shows how they became the progenitors of the Polynesian and Austronesian-speaking Melanesian peoples. The author describes Lapita sites, communities and landscapes, the development of their decorated ceramics, and their shell-tool industry. He reveals the means by which they accomplished such prodigious voyages and explains why they undertook them. He illustrates his account with specially drawn maps and with a wide range of photographs, many published for the first time. Drawing on the latest research in archaeology, anthropology, biology and linguistics, and written in clear, non-specialized language, this is an outstanding book of great importance to the history of South-East Asia and the Pacific.

Taking the High Ground

The Archaeology of Rapa, a Fortified Island in Remote East Polynesia

Author: Atholl Anderson,Douglas J. Kennett

Publisher: ANU E Press

ISBN: 1922144258

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 9678

This volume brings the remote and little known island of Rapa firmly to the forefront of Polynesian archaeology. Thirteen authors contribute 14 chapters, covering not only the basic archaeology of coastal sites, rock shelters, and fortifications, but faunal remains, agricultural development, and marine exploitation. The results, presented within a chronology framed by Bayesian analysis, are set against a background of ethnohistory and ethnology. Highly unusual in tropical Polynesian archaeology are descriptions of artefacts of perishable material. Taking the High Ground provides important insights into how a group of Polynesian settlers adapted to an isolated and in some ways restrictive environment.

The Wayfinders

Why Ancient Wisdom Matters in the Modern World

Author: Wade Davis

Publisher: House of Anansi

ISBN: 0887847668

Category: Social Science

Page: 262

View: 4161

Many of us are alarmed by the accelerating rates of extinction of plants and animals. But how many of us know that human cultures are going extinct at an even more shocking rate? While biologists estimate that 18 percent of mammals and 11 percent of birds are threatened, and botanists anticipate the loss of 8 percent of flora, anthropologists predict that fully 50 percent of the 7,000 languages spoken around the world today will disappear within our lifetimes. And languages are merely the canaries in the coal mine: what of the knowledge, stories, songs, and ways of seeing encoded in these voices? In The Wayfinders, Wade Davis offers a gripping and enlightening account of this urgent crisis. He leads us on a fascinating tour through a handful of indigenous cultures, describing the worldviews they represent and reminding us of the encroaching danger to humankind's survival should they vanish.

A Companion to Folklore

Author: Regina F. Bendix,Galit Hasan-Rokem

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444354388

Category: Social Science

Page: 680

View: 1491

A Companion to Folklore presents an original and comprehensive collection of essays from international experts in the field of folklore studies. Unprecedented in depth and scope, this state-of-the-art collection uniquely displays the vitality of folklore research across the globe. An unprecedented collection of original, state of the art essays on folklore authored by international experts Examines the practices and theoretical approaches developed to understand the phenomena of folklore Considers folklore in the context of multi-disciplinary topics that include poetics, performance, religious practice, myth, ritual and symbol, oral textuality, history, law, politics and power as well as the social base of folklore Selected by Choice as a 2013 Outstanding Academic Title

The Northern Gardener

From Apples to Zinnias

Author: Mary Lahr Schier

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781681340463

Category: Gardening

Page: 224

View: 2921

Tips and tricks for the northern gardener collected from 150 years of Minnesota State Horticultural Society publications. Illustrated with color photos and vintage artwork.

Sea of Glory

America's Voyage of Discovery, The U.S. Exploring Expedition, 1838-1842

Author: Nathaniel Philbrick

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781440649103

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 3463

"A treasure of a book."—David McCullough A New York Times Notable Book America's first frontier was not the West; it was the sea, and no one writes more eloquently about that watery wilderness than Nathaniel Philbrick. In his bestselling In the Heart of the Sea Philbrick probed the nightmarish dangers of the vast Pacific. Now, in an epic sea adventure, he writes about one of the most ambitious voyages of discovery the Western world has ever seen—the U.S. Exploring Expedition of 1838–1842. On a scale that dwarfed the journey of Lewis and Clark, six magnificent sailing vessels and a crew of hundreds set out to map the entire Pacific Ocean and ended up naming the newly discovered continent of Antarctica, collecting what would become the basis of the Smithsonian Institution. Combining spellbinding human drama and meticulous research, Philbrick reconstructs the dark saga of the voyage to show why, instead of being celebrated and revered as that of Lewis and Clark, it has—until now—been relegated to a footnote in the national memory. Winner of the Theodore and Franklin D. Roosevelt Naval History Prize

The Sea and Civilization

A Maritime History of the World

Author: Lincoln Paine

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307962253

Category: History

Page: 784

View: 480

A monumental retelling of world history through the lens of maritime enterprise, revealing in breathtaking depth how people first came into contact with one another by ocean and river, lake and stream, and how goods, languages, religions, and entire cultures spread across and along the world’s waterways, bringing together civilizations and defining what makes us most human. Lincoln Paine takes us back to the origins of long-distance migration by sea with our ancestors’ first forays from Africa and Eurasia to Australia and the Americas. He demonstrates the critical role of maritime trade to the civilizations of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, and the Indus Valley. He reacquaints us with the great seafaring cultures of antiquity like those of the Phoenicians and Greeks, as well as those of India and Southeast and East Asia, who parlayed their navigational skills, shipbuilding techniques, and commercial acumen to establish thriving overseas colonies and trade routes in the centuries leading up to the age of European expansion. And finally, his narrative traces how commercial shipping and naval warfare brought about the enormous demographic, cultural, and political changes that have globalized the world throughout the post–Cold War era. This tremendously readable intellectual adventure shows us the world in a new light, in which the sea reigns supreme. We find out how a once-enslaved East African king brought Islam to his people, what the American “sail-around territories” were, and what the Song Dynasty did with twenty-wheel, human-powered paddleboats with twenty paddle wheels and up to three hundred crew. Above all, Paine makes clear how the rise and fall of civilizations can be linked to the sea. An accomplishment of both great sweep and illuminating detail, The Sea and Civilization is a stunning work of history.