Primitive Technology 2

Author: David Wescott,Society of Primitive Technology

Publisher: Gibbs Smith

ISBN: 9781586850982

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 4272

The Stone Age is the common denominator of mankind, and through experimental archeology-the relearning and replication of ancient skills-we take a step of discovery and understanding into this rich past. In this collection, drawn from the pages of the Bulletin of Primitive Technology, learn to create tools to fabricate more complex technologies; master the arts of the bow and arrow; build a shelter or fashion clothing from fibers or buckskin. Primitive Technology II: Ancestral Skills provides the guide to rediscovery of the skills and crafts that bind us all into this great human family. David Wescott is author of Camping in the Old Style and editor of Primitive Technology: A Book of Earth Skills. Formerly education director for the Boulder Outdoor School, he has been a leading figure in wilderness education for more than thirty years. He lives with his wife in Rexburg, Idaho.

Primitive Technology

A Book of Earth Skills

Author: David Wescott,Society of Primitive Technology

Publisher: Gibbs Smith

ISBN: 9780879059118

Category: Nature

Page: 248

View: 7830

8 3/16 X 10 7/8 In, 232 Pp, 100 Black & White Photographs, 150 Line Drawings Have You Ever Longed To Return To A Past Where Humanity's Greatest Concern Was Survival, When Our Hands Created Life's Necessities, When The Land's Raw Provisions Were The Materials With Which We Created Warmth, Shelter, Food, and Tools--A Time Before We Lost Our Bond With The Wilderness? Primitive Technology Helps Build A Bridge Between The Ancient Past and Our Modern Lives, Putting Us In Touch Again With Nature and Ourselves. This Volume--A Selection of Articles Within The Bulletin of Primitive Technology--Portrays The History, Philosophise, and Personal Journeys of Authorities On Primitive Technology, Imparting Skills That Built The Success of Mankind. From Views On Primitive Technology and "New" Archaeology To Making Fire and Tools of Bone, This Book Is Informative and Enlightening

Practicing Primitive

A Handbook of Aboriginal Skills

Author: Steven M. Watts

Publisher: Gibbs Smith

ISBN: 9781586852993

Category: History

Page: 225

View: 9287

Practicing Primitive: A Handbook of Aboriginal Skills is a collection of information and images put together over a twenty-year period in a search for hands-on communication with our shared Stone Age past. The story of the Stone Age is our story, and primitive technology is a way for anyone who wants to understand that shared history. Watts makes the case that the learning and practice of aboriginal skills helps us connect with our remote past, encourages us to participate in the shared inheritance of primitive ('first') skills. Practicing Primitive includes detailed instructions on how to make or perform over 65 Stone Age objects or skills, covering primitive basics such as making axes and food utensils out of stone, bone, shell, and plant material; bark and reed shelters; bags and ropes made of bark and leaves; watercraft out of reeds or bamboo; and much more. Watts covers the environment, lifestyle, and tool kit of three different stages of human evolution: the Lower Paleolithic of 2.5 million years ago, the Middle Paleolithic of 60 thousand years ago, and the Mesolithic 9 thousand years ago. Steven M. Watts, has directed the Aboriginal Studies Program at the Schiele Museum of Natural History in Gastonia, North Carolina, since 1984. Steve is currently president of the international Society of Primitive Technology, which publishes a biannual journal, The Bulletin of Primitive Technology. He is the author of many articles dealing with culture and technology, and served as a consultant on the 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment movie Cast Away. Steve has an undergraduate degree from Appalachian State University and a master's degree from Duke University.

Earth Knack

Stone Age Skills for the 21st Century

Author: Bart Blankenship,Robin Blankenship

Publisher: Gibbs Smith

ISBN: 9780879057336

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 192

View: 2286

Chuck it all and live in a cave? No way! Adopt some Stone Age skills? Absolutely! This information-packed book doesn't just talk, it shows you ways to bring the best of our environment into your life. The relevant skills and ideas in EARTH KNACK will not only have you creating objects, but will also give you a new sense of self-fulfillment and self-worth.

Camping in the Old Style

Author: David Wescott

Publisher: Gibbs Smith

ISBN: 142363795X

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 224

View: 9288

Back before the days of RVs, nylon sleeping bags, and all the other modern camping conveniences, people still went camping. This updated and newly designed color edition of Camping in the Old Style explores the techniques and methods used during the golden age of camping, including woodcraft, how to set a campfire, food preparation, pitching a tent, auto camping, and canoeing. The book is loaded with nuggets of wisdom from classic books written by camping and outdoors pioneers of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, such as Daniel Carter Beard, Warren H. Miller, Ernest Thompson Seton, Horace Kephart, and Nessmuk, and author David Wescott includes his own methods, techniques, and philosophies as well. A generous addition of color photos of present-day classic camping enthusiasts supplements many of the fascinating archival black-and-white photos. David Wescott is the author of Primitive Technology: A Book of Earth Skills. He has been a lifelong enthusiast in primitive technologies and a leading figure in wilderness education for more than forty years, including as the managing editor of the Bulletin of Primitive Technology, the director of Backtracks, and the education director for the Boulder Outdoor Survival School. He lives in Rexburg, Idaho, with his wife, Paula.

Flintknapping

Making and Understanding Stone Tools

Author: John C. Whittaker

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292792557

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 8353

Flintknapping is an ancient craft enjoying a resurgence of interest among both amateur and professional students of prehistoric cultures. In this new guide, John C. Whittaker offers the most detailed handbook on flintknapping currently available and the only one written from the archaeological perspective of interpreting stone tools as well as making them. Flintknapping contains detailed, practical information on making stone tools. Whittaker starts at the beginner level and progresses to discussion of a wide range of techniques. He includes information on necessary tools and materials, as well as step-by-step instructions for making several basic stone tool types. Numerous diagrams allow the reader to visualize the flintknapping process, and drawings of many stone tools illustrate the discussions and serve as models for beginning knappers. Written for a wide amateur and professional audience, Flintknapping will be essential for practicing knappers as well as for teachers of the history of technology, experimental archaeology, and stone tool analysis.

Unlearn, Rewild

Earth Skills, Ideas and Inspiration for the Future Primitive

Author: Miles Olson

Publisher: New Society Publishers

ISBN: 0865717214

Category: Nature

Page: 240

View: 8196

Provides a manual to break free from enslavement to jobs, bills, and the trap of civilization, sharing advice on survival skills and sustainable living.

Designing Experimental Research in Archaeology

Examining Technology Through Production and Use

Author: Jeffrey R. Ferguson

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 1607320223

Category: Social Science

Page: 262

View: 7694

Each chapter addresses a particular classification of material culture---ceramics, stone tools, perishable materials, composite hunting technology, butchering practices and bone tools, and experimental zooarchaeology---detailing issues that must be considered in the development of experimental archaeology projects and discussing potential pitfalls. The experiments follow coherent and consistent research designs and procedures that are given theoretical context. Contributors outline methods that will serve as a guide in future experiments. This degree of standardization is uncommon in traditional archaeological research but is essential to experimental archaeology. --

Ultimate Guide to Wilderness Living

Surviving with Nothing But Your Bare Hands and What You Find in the Woods

Author: John McPherson,Geri McPherson

Publisher: Ulysses Press

ISBN: 156975358X

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 380

View: 6322

Flint Knapping

A Guide to Making Your Own Stone Age Tool Kit

Author: Robert Turner

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 0752492810

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 168

View: 3026

A guide to an essential skill of our prehistoric ancestorsFlint knapping was one of the primary survival skills of our prehistoric ancestors. This highly original guide will enable the reader, with practice, to manufacture their own Stone Age tool kit. The expert author guides the reader on a journey of discovery, passing on ancient knowledge of how flint tools from the Palaeolithic, Mesolithic, Neolithic, and Bronze age were made and used.

Inconstant Companions

Archaeology and North American Indian Oral Traditions

Author: Ronald J. Mason

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817315330

Category: Social Science

Page: 298

View: 2898

One of the most significant theoretical issues in contemporary American archaeology—the role of oral tradition in scientific research. Ronald J. Mason explores the tension between aboriginal oral traditions and the practice of archaeology in North America. That exploration is necessarily interdisciplinary and set in a global context. Indeed, the issues at stake are universal in the current era of intellectual "decolonization" and multiculturalism. Unless committed to writing, even the most esteemed utterances are inevitably forgotten with the passing of generations, however much the succeeding ones try to reproduce what they think they had heard. Writing shares with archaeo-logical remains a greater, if unequal, durability. Through copious examples across academic and ethnographic spectra and over millennia, Mason examines the disparate functions of traditional "ways of knowing" in contrast to the paradigm of science and critical historiography.

Caveman Logic

The Persistence of Primitive Thinking in a Modern World

Author: Hank Davis

Publisher: Prometheus Books

ISBN: 1615928820

Category: Philosophy

Page: N.A

View: 2931

We see the face of the Virgin Mary staring up at us from a grilled cheese sandwich and sell the uneaten portion of our meal for $37,000 on eBay. While science offers a wealth of rational explanations for natural phenomena, we often prefer to embrace the fantasies that reassured our distant ancestors. And we'll even go to war to protect our delusions against those who do not share them.These are examples of what evolutionary psychologist Hank Davis calls Caveman Logic. Although some examples are funny, the condition itself is no laughing matter. In this engagingly written book, Davis encourages us to transcend the mental default settings and tribal loyalties that worked well for our ancestors back in the Pleistocene age. Davis laments a modern world in which more people believe in ESP, ghosts, and angels than in evolution. Superstition and religion get particularly critical treatment, although Davis argues that religion, itself, is not the problem but an inevitable by-product of how our minds misperform.Davis argues, It's time to move beyond the one-size-fits-all, safety and comfort-oriented settings that got our ancestors through the terrifying Pleistocene night. In contrast, Davis advocates a world in which spirituality is viewed as a dangerous rather than an admirable quality, and suggests ways in which we can overcome our innate predisposition toward irrationality. He concludes by pointing out that biology is not destiny. Just as some of us succeed in watching our diets, resisting violent impulses, and engaging in unselfish behavior, we can learn to use critical thinking and the insights of science to guide individual effort and social action in the service of our whole species.Hank Davis (Guelph, Ontario, Canada) is an award-winning professor of psychology who teaches at the University of Guelph. He is the author of several books and more than one hundred scientific papers.

Participating in Nature

Thomas J. Elpel's Field Guide to Primitive Living Skills

Author: Thomas J. Elpel

Publisher: Hops Press

ISBN: 9781892784124

Category: Nature

Page: 198

View: 7939

Participating in Nature teaches you how to stay warm and comfortable without a sleeping bag, how to start a fire by friction, and how to build a reliable shelter from natural materials. Includes the self-reliance skills of fishing by hand, cooking edible plants, felting with wool, and making stone knives, wooden containers, willow baskets, and cordage.

Sapiens

A Brief History of Humankind

Author: Yuval Noah Harari

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062316109

Category: Science

Page: 464

View: 6064

New York Times Bestseller A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.” One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us? Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas. Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become? Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.

The Universal Tool Kit

Out of Africa to Native California

Author: Paul Douglas Campbell

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780979378010

Category: History

Page: 314

View: 1076

From earliest Stone Age in Africa to 20th century California, our ancestors smashed rock to make tools. The tools from broken stones formed the most important survival kit ever invented and is surprisingly similar the world over. Elements of that kit live on today in remote corners of the globe among people close to the earth. The most important survival kit ever invented, it altered the very shape of the human species and for millions of years was truly a universal tool kit. The universal tool kit endured and accompanied man into the New World where it is strongly represented in all levels of archaeology and the ethnology of Native California. This book explores the origin, description and function of baseline stone tools and its practical applications and templates of manufacture. It also looks at stone age spear throwers and how they were used.

Catching Fire

How Cooking Made Us Human

Author: Richard W. Wrangham

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 184668286X

Category: Science

Page: 309

View: 7879

In this stunningly original book, Richard Wrangham argues that it was cooking that caused the extraordinary transformation of our ancestors from apelike beings to Homo erectus. At the heart of Catching Fire lies an explosive new idea: the habit of eating cooked rather than raw food permitted the digestive tract to shrink and the human brain to grow, helped structure human society, and created the male-female division of labour. As our ancestors adapted to using fire, humans emerged as "the cooking apes". Covering everything from food-labelling and overweight pets to raw-food faddists, Catching Fire offers a startlingly original argument about how we came to be the social, intelligent, and sexual species we are today. "This notion is surprising, fresh and, in the hands of Richard Wrangham, utterly persuasive ... Big, new ideas do not come along often in evolution these days, but this is one." -Matt Ridley, author of Genome

The Theory of the Leisure Class

An Economic Study of Institutions

Author: Thorstein Veblen

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Clase ociosa

Page: 404

View: 1922

The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains

Author: Nicholas Carr

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393079364

Category: Science

Page: 256

View: 3995

Finalist for the 2011 Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction: “Nicholas Carr has written a Silent Spring for the literary mind.”—Michael Agger, Slate “Is Google making us stupid?” When Nicholas Carr posed that question, in a celebrated Atlantic Monthly cover story, he tapped into a well of anxiety about how the Internet is changing us. He also crystallized one of the most important debates of our time: As we enjoy the Net’s bounties, are we sacrificing our ability to read and think deeply? Now, Carr expands his argument into the most compelling exploration of the Internet’s intellectual and cultural consequences yet published. As he describes how human thought has been shaped through the centuries by “tools of the mind”—from the alphabet to maps, to the printing press, the clock, and the computer—Carr interweaves a fascinating account of recent discoveries in neuroscience by such pioneers as Michael Merzenich and Eric Kandel. Our brains, the historical and scientific evidence reveals, change in response to our experiences. The technologies we use to find, store, and share information can literally reroute our neural pathways. Building on the insights of thinkers from Plato to McLuhan, Carr makes a convincing case that every information technology carries an intellectual ethic—a set of assumptions about the nature of knowledge and intelligence. He explains how the printed book served to focus our attention, promoting deep and creative thought. In stark contrast, the Internet encourages the rapid, distracted sampling of small bits of information from many sources. Its ethic is that of the industrialist, an ethic of speed and efficiency, of optimized production and consumption—and now the Net is remaking us in its own image. We are becoming ever more adept at scanning and skimming, but what we are losing is our capacity for concentration, contemplation, and reflection. Part intellectual history, part popular science, and part cultural criticism, The Shallows sparkles with memorable vignettes—Friedrich Nietzsche wrestling with a typewriter, Sigmund Freud dissecting the brains of sea creatures, Nathaniel Hawthorne contemplating the thunderous approach of a steam locomotive—even as it plumbs profound questions about the state of our modern psyche. This is a book that will forever alter the way we think about media and our minds.