Quackery

A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything

Author: Lydia Kang,Nate Pedersen

Publisher: Workman Publishing

ISBN: 1523501855

Category: Medical

Page: 256

View: 2391

What won’t we try in our quest for perfect health, beauty, and the fountain of youth? Well, just imagine a time when doctors prescribed morphine for crying infants. When liquefied gold was touted as immortality in a glass. And when strychnine—yes, that strychnine, the one used in rat poison—was dosed like Viagra. Looking back with fascination, horror, and not a little dash of dark, knowing humor, Quackery recounts the lively, at times unbelievable, history of medical misfires and malpractices. Ranging from the merely weird to the outright dangerous, here are dozens of outlandish, morbidly hilarious “treatments”—conceived by doctors and scientists, by spiritualists and snake oil salesmen (yes, they literally tried to sell snake oil)—that were predicated on a range of cluelessness, trial and error, and straight-up scams. With vintage illustrations, photographs, and advertisements throughout, Quackery seamlessly combines macabre humor with science and storytelling to reveal an important and disturbing side of the ever-evolving field of medicine.

Quackery

A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything

Author: Lydia Kang,Nate Pedersen

Publisher: Workman Publishing

ISBN: 0761189815

Category: Medical

Page: 352

View: 5646

What won’t we try in our quest for perfect health, beauty, and the fountain of youth? Well, just imagine a time when doctors prescribed morphine for crying infants. When liquefied gold was touted as immortality in a glass. And when strychnine—yes, that strychnine, the one used in rat poison—was dosed like Viagra. Looking back with fascination, horror, and not a little dash of dark, knowing humor, Quackery recounts the lively, at times unbelievable, history of medical misfires and malpractices. Ranging from the merely weird to the outright dangerous, here are dozens of outlandish, morbidly hilarious “treatments”—conceived by doctors and scientists, by spiritualists and snake oil salesmen (yes, they literally tried to sell snake oil)—that were predicated on a range of cluelessness, trial and error, and straight-up scams. With vintage illustrations, photographs, and advertisements throughout, Quackery seamlessly combines macabre humor with science and storytelling to reveal an important and disturbing side of the ever-evolving field of medicine.

Doctoring the Novel

Medicine and Quackery from Shelley to Doyle

Author: Sylvia A. Pamboukian

Publisher: Ohio University Press

ISBN: 0821444069

Category: Medical

Page: 224

View: 400

If nineteenth-century Britain witnessed the rise of medical professionalism, it also witnessed rampant quackery. It is tempting to categorize historical practices as either orthodox or quack, but what did these terms really signify in medical and public circles at the time? How did they develop and evolve? What do they tell us about actual medical practices? Doctoring the Novel explores the ways in which language constructs and stabilizes these slippery terms by examining medical quackery and orthodoxy in works such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Charles Dickens’s Bleak House and Little Dorrit, Charlotte Brontë’s Villette, Wilkie Collins’s Armadale, and Arthur Conan Doyle’s Stark Munro Letters. Contextualized in both medical and popular publishing, literary analysis reveals that even supposedly medico-scientific concepts such as orthodoxy and quackery evolve not in elite laboratories and bourgeois medical societies but in the rough-and-tumble of the public sphere, a view that acknowledges the considerable, and often underrated, influence of language on medical practices.

Pamphlets

Quacks and Quackery

Author: American Medical Association. Bureau of Investigation

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Quacks and quackery

Page: N.A

View: 4753

American Health Quackery

Collected Essays of James Harvey Young

Author: James Harvey Young

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400862914

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 9559

James Harvey Young, the foremost expert on the history of medical frauds, finds quackery in the 1990s to be more extensive and insidious than in earlier and allegedly more naive eras. The modern quack isn't an outrageous-looking hawker of magic remedies operating from the back of a carnival wagon, but he knows how to use antiregulatory sentiment and ingenious promotional approaches to succeed in a "trade" that is both bizarre and deceitful. In The Toadstool Millionaires and The Medical Messiahs, Young traced the history of health quackery in America from its colonial roots to the late 1960s. This collection of essays discusses more recent health scams and reconsiders earlier ones. Liberally illustrated with examples of advertising for patent medicines and other "alternative therapies," the book links evolving quackery to changing currents in the scientific, cultural, and governmental environment. Young describes varieties of quackery, like frauds related to the teeth, nostrums aimed at children, and cure-all gadgets with such names as Electreat Mechanical Heart. The case of Laetrile illustrates how an alleged vitamin for controlling cancer could be ballyhooed and lobbied into a national mania, half the states passing laws giving the cyanide-containing drug some special status. And AIDS is the most recent example of an illness that, tragically, has panicked some of its victims and members of the general public into putting their hopes in fake cures and preventives. Young discusses the complex question of vulnerability--why people fall victim to health fraud--and considers the difficulties confronting governmental regulators. From the late 1960s to the early 1990s, the annual quackery toll has escalated from two billion to over twenty-five billion dollars. Young helps us discover why. Originally published in 1992. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

The Medical Messiahs

A Social History of Health Quackery in 20th Century America

Author: James Harvey Young

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400868696

Category: Psychology

Page: 522

View: 2741

James Harvey Young describes the development of patent medicines in America from the enactment in 1906 of the Pure Food and Drugs Act through the mid-1960s. Many predicted that the Pure Food and Drugs Act would be the end of harmful nostrums, but Young describes in colorful detail post-Act cases involving manufacturers and promoters of such products as Cuforhedake Brane-Fude, B. & M. "tuberculosis-curing" liniment, and the dangerous reducing pill Marmola. We meet, among others, the brothers Charles Frederick and Peter Kaadt, who treated diabetic patients with a mixture of vinegar and saltpeter; Louisiana state senator Dudley J. LeBlanc, who put on fabulous medicine shows as late as the 1950s promoting Hadacol and his own political career, and Adolphus Hohensee, whose lectures on nutrition provide a classic example of the continuing appeal of food faddism. Review: "The Medical Messiahs is an example of historical writing at its best—scholarly, perceptive, and exceedingly readable. Despite his objectivity, Young's dry humor shines through and illuminates his entire book."—John Duffy, Journal of Southern History "This book is written in tight, graceful prose that reflects thought rather than substitutes for it. Done with a sure feel for the larger political, social, and economic background, it demonstrates that historians who would make socially relevant contributions need only adhere to the best canons of their art."—Oscar E. Anderson, Jr., The American Historical Review "[This] material is so interestingly presented that the readers may not immediately appreciate what a major historic study [the book] is, and how carefully documented and critically analyzed."—Lester S. King, Journal of the American Medical Association "Dr. Young's well-written social history of health quackery in twentieth-century America will not only increase the understanding of our times by future historians but will also be of great value to all those interested in improving the health of the population by reminding them of the past."—F. M. Berger, The American Scientist Originally published in 1967. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Bad Science

Quacks, Hacks, and Big Pharma Flacks

Author: Ben Goldacre

Publisher: McClelland & Stewart

ISBN: 0771035764

Category: Science

Page: 304

View: 2565

The informative and witty expose of the "bad science" we are all subjected to, called "one of the essential reads of the year" by New Scientist. We are obsessed with our health. And yet — from the media's "world-expert microbiologist" with a mail-order Ph.D. in his garden shed laboratory, and via multiple health scares and miracle cures — we are constantly bombarded with inaccurate, contradictory, and sometimes even misleading information. Until now. Ben Goldacre masterfully dismantles the questionable science behind some of the great drug trials, court cases, and missed opportunities of our time, but he also goes further: out of the bullshit, he shows us the fascinating story of how we know what we know, and gives us the tools to uncover bad science for ourselves. From the Hardcover edition.

The Health Robbers

A Close Look at Quackery in America

Author: Stephen Barrett,William T. Jarvis

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Medical

Page: 526

View: 1184

Shows how to identify health frauds, fad diagnoses, and unproven treatments, and discusses holistic medicine, dental care, nutrition, and acupuncture

Primitive Psychotherapy and Quackery

Author: Robert Means Lawrence

Publisher: Kessinger Publishing

ISBN: 9780766134010

Category: Psychology

Page: 288

View: 7786

The power of suggestion and imagination has long been used by charlatans and other medical personnel to heal. This book brings to light the phenomenal power of mental influence on healing. He has included chapters dealing with: medical amulets; talismans; phylacteries; power of words; curative influence of the imagination; royal touch; blue-glass mania; temples of Esculapius; styptic charms; healing spells in ancient times; medicinal runic inscriptions; metallo-therapy; animal magnetism; ancient medical prescriptions; remedial virtues ascribed to relics; healing influence of music; quacks and quackery. With an appendix of noted irregular practitioners.

Corporate Risk and Governance

An End to Mismanagement, Tunnel Vision and Quackery

Author: Dr Alan Waring

Publisher: Gower Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1472402448

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 244

View: 8051

Corporate Risk and Governance addresses corporate risk management and governance requirements affecting large organizations in all industry sectors and countries. The book strongly advocates implementation of Corporate Governance Codes, ISO 31000 Risk Management, ISO 22301 Business Continuity Management and PAS 200 Crisis Management but warns against treating any standard or model slavishly, as if it can offer easy salvation or a simple route to a risk nirvana. Alan Waring challenges many hallowed beliefs, attitudes and practices that continue to hamper the delivery of effective Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) and thereby good governance. Those boardroom and corporate cultures that are complacent about risk exposures and risk management or, worse, encourage ‘chancers’ and a ‘what can we get away with’ attitude, are examined in depth along with what is required to embed a culture of responsible risk-taking. Some 75 cases from around the world provide graphic examples and lessons to be learned. Although the text includes some summary practical guidance, this book is designed primarily as a thinking aid rather than a risk management cookbook. It is something to encourage better informed risk-decision making; a more informed view of enterprise risk exposures, control and mitigation issues and an awareness of boardroom and corporate culture issues and their impact on effective ERM.

Chris Beat Cancer

A Comprehensive Plan for Healing Naturally

Author: Chris Wark

Publisher: Hay House, Inc

ISBN: 1401956122

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 312

View: 4063

Colon cancer survivor who opted against chemotherapy and radiation provides the toxin-free diet, lifestyle, and therapy guidelines he used to help himself heal. Two days before Christmas and at 26 years old, Chris Wark was diagnosed with stage 3 colon cancer. He had surgery to remove a golf ball-sized tumor and a third of his colon. But after surgery, instead of the traditional chemotherapy, Wark decided to radically change his diet and lifestyle in order to promote health and healing in his body. In Chris Beat Cancer, Wark describes his healing journey, exposes the corruption and ineffectiveness of the medical and cancer industries, and shares the strategies that he and many others have used to heal cancer. These strategies include adopting the Beat Cancer Mindset; radical diet and lifestyle changes; and mental, emotional, and spiritual healing, as well as advanced integrative therapies. Dually packed with an emotional punch and extensive healing solutions, Chris Beat Cancer will inspire and guide you on your own journey toward wellness.

Quackery

A $10 Billion Scandal : Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care of the Select Committee on Aging, House of Representatives, Ninety-eighth Congress, Second Session, May 31, 1984

Author: United States. Congress. House. Select Committee on Aging. Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Quacks and quackery

Page: 252

View: 6190

Quackery

Author: James Playfair McMurrich

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Medical

Page: 11

View: 6374

The Medical Electricians

George A. Scott and His Victorian Cohorts in Quackery

Author: Robert K. Waits

Publisher: Createspace Independent Pub

ISBN: 9781466346116

Category: History

Page: 332

View: 723

George Augustus Scott, although he gained notoriety (and riches) selling 'electric' cure-alls, was a wide-ranging entrepreneur. Scott left behind legitimate legacies: successful manufacturing businesses in Massachusetts and London, and a famously unsuccessful mercantile cooperative in New York. The story of 'Dr. Scott, ' a quack peddler of Electric brushes, corsets, and belts, electric in name only, is intertwined with those of several other Victorian Medical Electricians. He mentored proteges who became infamous for quackery: Cornelius B. Harness, in England, and John R. Foran in America; and tangled with a feisty Brooklyn competitor, William C. Wilson, who later took up with Foran. George Scott was not a physician, and avoided referring to himself as Doctor except in his audacious advertisements. He did not seek personal publicity (an attribute rare among quacks) but was well known socially. Scott died a wealthy man at age 48, and his Pall Mall Electric business persisted for years, the last known advertisements appeared in the 1920s. Here are the advertisements and adventures of Scott, Harness, Wilson, Foran and their colleagues in quackery during the latter part of the Nineteenth Century."

Nostrums and Quackery

Articles on the Nostrum Evil and Quackery Reprinted from the Journal of the American Medical Association

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 509

View: 7544

Quack Doctor

Historical Remedies for All Your Ills

Author: Caroline Rance

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 0750951834

Category: Medical

Page: 224

View: 2401

From the harangues of mountebanks to the dubious advertisements in Victorian newspapers, quackery sports a colorful history. Featuring entertaining advertisements from historical newspapers, this book investigates the inventive ways in which quack remedies were promoted – and whether the people who bought them should be written off as gullible after all. There's the Methodist minister and his museum of intestinal worms, the obesity cure that turned fat into sweat, and the device that brought the fresh air of Italy into British homes. The story of quack advertising is bawdy, gruesome, funny, and sometimes moving – and in this book it takes to the stage to promote itself as a fascinating part of the history of medicine.

Quack!

Tales of Medical Fraud from the Museum of Questionable Medical Devices

Author: Bob McCoy

Publisher: Santa Monica PressLlc

ISBN: 9781891661105

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 235

View: 540

In Quack! Tales of Medical Fraud from the Museum of Questionable Medical Devices, curator Bob McCoy shares his collection of the hilarious, horrifying, and preposterous medical devices that have been foisted upon the public in their quest for good health. From the Prostate Gland Warmer to the Recto Rotor, from the Nose Straightener to the Wonder Electric Generator, these implements reveal the desperate measures taken by the public in their search for magic cures. With period advertisements, promotional literature, and gadget instructions, this book offers a wealth of past—and present—medical fraud. For instance, you'll learn about: Albert Abrams, the "King of Quackery," who believed that all that was needed from a patient for diagnosis was a drop of blood, a single hair, or even a handwriting sample as these would give off the unique "vibrations" of that individual. His theories were so popular that none other than Upton Sinclair promoted them in an article for Pearson's magazine. Wilhelm Reich, the groundbreaking psychiatrist who, in the latter portion of his storied career, discovered "Orgone"—the energy supposedly released during sexual orgasm. According to Reich, absorbing large quantities of Orgone through his Orgone Energy Accumulator would make a person healthier. Dr. Albert C. Geyser, whose Tricho machine for removing unwanted hair through x-ray depilitation resulted in thousands of women contracting hardened and wrinkled skin, receded gums, never-healing ulcerated sores, tumors, and, of course, cancer. And if you think quackery is a thing of a past, a sampling of late night television commercials advertising everything from fat burners to magnetic and/or copper pain relievers will cure you of that notion. In fact, in the mid-1990s, a product called "The Stimulator" was advertised on television as a "cure" for pain, menstrual problems, arthritis, and carpal tunnel syndrome. The commercial—featuring Evel Knievel as its spokesperson—was so effective that over 800,000 Stimulators were sold for $88.30 before the FDA shut the company down. Still, the owners made quite a hefty profit on what was simply a one dollar gas grill igniter!

Nostrums and Quackery

Articles on the Nostrum Evil and Quackery

Author: Arthur Joseph Cramp

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Patent medicines

Page: N.A

View: 2149