Race, Labor, and Civil Rights

Griggs versus Duke Power and the Struggle for Equal Employment Opportunity

Author: Robert Samuel Smith

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 9780807133637

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 3399

In 1966, thirteen black employees of the Duke Power Company's Dan River Plant in Draper, North Carolina, filed a lawsuit against the company challenging its requirement of a high school diploma or a passing grade on an intelligence test for internal transfer or promotion. In the groundbreaking decision Griggs v. Duke Power (1971), the United States Supreme Court ruled in favor of the plaintiffs, finding such employment practices violated Title 7 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 when they disparately affected minorities. In doing so, the court delivered a significant anti-employment discrimination verdict. Legal scholars rank Griggs v. Duke Power on par with Brown v. Board of Education (1954) in terms of its impact on eradicating race discrimination from American institutions. In Race, Labor, and Civil Rights, Robert Samuel Smith offers the first full-length historical examination of this important case and its connection to civil rights activism during the second half of the 1960s. Smith explores all aspects of Griggs, highlighting the sustained energy of the grassroots civil rights community and the critical importance of courtroom activism. Smith shows that after years of nonviolent, direct action protests, African Americans remained vigilant in the 1960s, heading back to the courts to reinvigorate the civil rights acts in an effort to remove the lingering institutional bias left from decades of overt racism. He asserts that alongside the more boisterous expressions of black radicalism of the late sixties, foot soldiers and local leaders of the civil rights community -- many of whom were working-class black southerners -- mustered ongoing legal efforts to mold Title 7 into meaningful law. Smith also highlights the persistent judicial activism of the NAACP-Legal Defense and Education Fund and the ascension of the second generation of civil rights attorneys. By exploring the virtually untold story of Griggs v. Duke Power, Smith's enlightening study connects the case and the campaign for equal employment opportunity to the broader civil rights movement and reveals the civil rights community's continued spirit of legal activism well into the 1970s.

The 1960s: Key Themes and Documents

Author: James S. Olson

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440860424

Category: History

Page: 315

View: 6206

This volume serves as an invaluable study guide covering all of the key political, social, and cultural concepts of the turbulent 1960s. • Provides for ease of reference through rigorous thematic tagging of encyclopedic entries, period chronology, and primary documents • Helps readers to study a key period of American history • Features additional elements such as a sample document-based essay question and tips for answering document-based essay questions

Sharing the Prize

Author: Gavin Wright

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674076443

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 368

View: 2808

Southern bus boycotts and lunch counter sit-ins were famous acts of civil disobedience but were also demands for jobs in the very services being denied blacks. Gavin Wright shows that the civil rights struggle was of economic benefit to all parties: the wages of southern blacks increased dramatically but not at the expense of southern whites.

Freedom Rights

New Perspectives on the Civil Rights Movement

Author: Danielle McGuire

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813134498

Category: History

Page: 402

View: 2853

In his seminal article “Freedom Then, Freedom Now,” renowned civil rights historian Steven F. Lawson described his vision for the future study of the civil rights movement. Lawson called for a deeper examination of the social, economic, and political factors that influenced the movement’s development and growth. He urged his fellow scholars to connect the “local with the national, the political with the social,” and to investigate the ideological origins of the civil rights movement, its internal dynamics, the role of women, and the significance of gender and sexuality. In Freedom Rights: New Perspectives on the Civil Rights Movement, editors Danielle L. McGuire and John Dittmer follow Lawson’s example, bringing together the best new scholarship on the modern civil rights movement. The work expands our understanding of the movement by engaging issues of local and national politics, gender and race relations, family, community, and sexuality. The volume addresses cultural, legal, and social developments and also investigates the roots of the movement. Each essay highlights important moments in the history of the struggle, from the impact of the Young Women’s Christian Association on integration to the use of the arts as a form of activism. Freedom Rights not only answers Lawson’s call for a more dynamic, interactive history of the civil rights movement, but it also helps redefine the field.

The Supreme Court, Race, and Civil Rights

From Marshall to Rehnquist

Author: Abraham L. Davis,Barbara Luck Graham

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 1506320252

Category: Political Science

Page: 512

View: 7480

Providing a well-rounded presentation of the constitution and evolution of civil rights in the United States, this book will be useful for students and academics with an interest in civil rights, race and the law. Abraham L Davis and Barbara Luck Graham's purpose is: to give an overview of the Supreme Court and its rulings with regard to issues of equality and civil rights; to bring law, political science and history into the discussion of civil rights and the Supreme Court; to incorporate the politically disadvantaged and the human component into the discussion; to stimulate discussion among students; and to provide a text that cultivates competence in reading actual Supreme Court cases.

Discipline & Punish

The Birth of the Prison

Author: Michel Foucault

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307819299

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 1591

In this brilliant work, the most influential philosopher since Sartre suggests that such vaunted reforms as the abolition of torture and the emergence of the modern penitentiary have merely shifted the focus of punishment from the prisoner's body to his soul.

The Law of Sex Discrimination

Author: Beth Wolfson,Carla Palumbo,J. Ralph Lindgren,Nadine Taub

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 0495793221

Category: Political Science

Page: 512

View: 8657

An honest and informative text on sex discrimination and the law, THE LAW OF SEX DISCRIMINATION approaches the idea of using law to analyze sex discrimination from a variety of contexts: as an occasion for ideological disputes, as a reflection of contemporary policy debates over the future direction of society, and as part of the historical development of -- and response to -- feminism. Fully updated for 21st century, this flexibly organized text examines topics that range from reproductive rights to global trends in gender law, and includes appendices that deal with the court system, a brief discussion of how to outline cases, and a glossary of legal and technical terms. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Black Power

The Politics of Liberation in America

Author: Stokely Carmichael,Charles V. Hamilton,Kwame Ture

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0679743138

Category: Social Science

Page: 230

View: 8270

An explanation of the ideology and desired political framework of the Black Power movement in America

The Crusade for Equality in the Workplace

The Griggs V. Duke Power Story

Author: Robert K. Belton,Stephen L. Wasby

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780700619535

Category: Law

Page: 412

View: 4602

The seminal history of Title VII of the civil Rights Act of 1964, workplace equality, and how Griggs v. Duke Power led to its interpretation and enforcement.

Reasoning from Race

Author: Serena Mayeri

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674061101

Category: Law

Page: 369

View: 5307

"Informed in 1944 that she was 'not of the sex' entitled to be admitted to Harvard Law School, African American activist Pauli Murray confronted the injustice she called 'Jane Crow.' In the 1960s and 1970s, the analogies between sex and race discrimination pioneered by Murray became potent weapons in the battle for women's rights, as feminists borrowed rhetoric and legal arguments from the civil rights movement. Serena Mayeri's Reasoning from Race is the first book to explore the development and consequences of this key feminist strategy. Mayeri uncovers the history of an often misunderstood connection at the heart of American antidiscrimination law. Her study details how a tumultuous political and legal climate transformed the links between race and sex equality, civil rights and feminism. Battles over employment discrimination, school segregation, reproductive freedom, affirmative action, and constitutional change reveal the promise and peril of reasoning from race--and offer a vivid picture of Pauli Murray, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and others who defined feminists' agenda. Looking beneath the surface of Supreme Court opinions to the deliberations of feminist advocates, their opponents, and the legal decisionmakers who heard--or chose not to hear--their claims, Reasoning from Race showcases previously hidden struggles that continue to shape the scope and meaning of equality under the law"--Publisher description.

Constitutional Choices

Author: Laurence H. Tribe

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780674165397

Category: Law

Page: 458

View: 8952

Constitutional Choices illuminates the world 0f scholarship and advocacy uniquely combined by Laurence Tribe, one of the nation's leading professors of constitutional law and most successful practitioners before the Supreme Court. In his new hook, Tribe boldly moves beyond the seemingly endless debate over which judicial approaches to enforcing the Constitution are "legitimate" and which are not. Arguing that all claims to legitimacy must remain suspect, Tribe focuses instead on the choices that must nonetheless be made in resolving actual constitutional controversies. To do so, he examines problems as diverse as interstate banking, gender discrimination, church subsidies, the constitutional amendment process, the war powers of the President, and First Amendment protection of American Nazis. Challenging the ruling premises underlying many 0f the Supreme Court's positions on fundamental issues of government authority and individual rights, Tribe shows how the Court is increasingly coming to resemble a judicial Office of Management and Budget, straining constitutional discourse through a managerial sieve and defending its constitutional rulings by "balancing'' what it counts as "costs" against what it deems benefits?' Tribe explains how the Court's "Calculus" systematically excludes basic concerns about the distribution of wealth and power and conceals fundamental choices about the American polity. Calling for a more candid confrontation of those choices and of the principles and perspectives they reflect, Tribe exposes what has gone wrong and suggests how the Court can begin to reclaim the historic role entrusted to it by the Constitution.

The Rights Revolution Revisited

Author: Lynda G. Dodd

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107164737

Category: Law

Page: 400

View: 8467

Examines the implementation of the rights revolution, bringing together a distinguished group of political scientists and legal scholars who study the roles of agencies and courts in shaping the enforcement of civil rights statutes.

Because of Sex

One Law, Ten Cases, and Fifty Years That Changed American Women's Lives at Work

Author: Gillian Thomas

Publisher: Picador USA

ISBN: 1250138086

Category: Law

Page: 304

View: 4792

A compelling look at ten of the most important Supreme Court cases defining women’s rights on the job, as told by the brave women who brought the cases to court

For Jobs and Freedom

Race and Labor in America since 1865

Author: Robert H. Zieger

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 081314664X

Category: Political Science

Page: 312

View: 925

Whether as slaves or freedmen, the political and social status of African Americans has always been tied to their ability to participate in the nation's economy. Freedom in the post--Civil War years did not guarantee equality, and African Americans from emancipation to the present have faced the seemingly insurmountable task of erasing pervasive public belief in the inferiority of their race. For Jobs and Freedom: Race and Labor in America since 1865 describes the African American struggle to obtain equal rights in the workplace and organized labor's response to their demands. Award-winning historian Robert H. Zieger asserts that the promise of jobs was similar to the forty-acres-and-a-mule restitution pledged to African Americans during the Reconstruction era. The inconsistencies between rhetoric and action encouraged workers, both men and women, to organize themselves into unions to fight against unfair hiring practices and workplace discrimination. Though the path proved difficult, unions gradually obtained rights for African American workers with prominent leaders at their fore. In 1925, A. Philip Randolph formed the first black union, the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, to fight against injustices committed by the Pullman Company, an employer of significant numbers of African Americans. The Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) emerged in 1935, and its population quickly swelled to include over 500,000 African American workers. The most dramatic success came in the 1960s with the establishment of affirmative action programs, passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and Title VII enforcement measures prohibiting employer discrimination based on race. Though racism and unfair hiring practices still exist today, motivated individuals and leaders of the labor movement in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries laid the groundwork for better conditions and greater opportunities. Unions, with some sixteen million members currently in their ranks, continue to protect workers against discrimination in the expanding economy. For Jobs and Freedom is the first authoritative treatment in more than two decades of the race and labor movement, and Zieger's comprehensive and authoritative book will be standard reading on the subject for years to come.

Diversity and the Recreation Profession

Organizational Perspectives

Author: Maria Teresa Allison,Ingrid Eleanore Schneider

Publisher: Venture Pub

ISBN: 9781892132802

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 322

View: 2435

This sixth edition of Leisure in You Life continues to offer readers the opportunity to expand their consciousness, clarify their values, and gain a better understanding of recreation and leisure in their own lives, as well as the lives of others. This edition has been updated since its 1999 edition with post 9-11 observations, the globalization of commerce, reduced work hours and the search for meaning through leisure, and more. Thought-provoking questions and exercises conclude each chapter to help the reader better understand the issues that affect his or her perception of recreation and leisure, as well as how recreation and leisure influence his or her own life.

The Haitian Revolution

Author: Toussaint Louverture

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 123

View: 5095

Toussaint L'Ouverture was the leader of the Haitian Revolution in the late eighteenth century, in which slaves rebelled against their masters and established the first black republic. In this collection of his writings and speeches, former Haitian politician Jean-Bertrand Aristide demonstrates L'Ouverture's profound contribution to the struggle for equality.