Realist Magic

Objects, Ontology, Causality (New Metaphysics)

Author: Timothy Morton

Publisher: Open Humanitites Press

ISBN: 9781607852025

Category: Aesthetics

Page: 228

View: 1490

"Object-oriented ontology offers a startlingly fresh way to think about causality that takes into account developments in physics since 1900. Causality, argues, Object Oriented Ontology (OOO), is aesthetic. In this book, Timothy Morton explores what it means to say that a thing has come into being, that it is persisting, and that it has ended. Drawing from examples in physics, biology, ecology, art, literature and music, Morton demonstrates the counterintuitive yet elegant explanatory power of OOO for thinking causality."--Publisher's description.

Towards Speculative Realism

Essays and Lectures

Author: Graham Harman

Publisher: John Hunt Publishing

ISBN: 1846943949

Category: Philosophy

Page: 212

View: 2250

These writings chart Harman's rise from Chicago sportswriter to co-founder of one of Europe's most promising philosophical movements - Speculative Realism. This collection of essays and lectures show the evolution of his object-oriented metaphysics from its early days into an increasingly developed philosophical position.

Speculative Realism

Author: Professor of Philosophy Levi R (Collin College) Bryant

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748679987

Category: Philosophy

Page: 313

View: 2430

Defends and transforms naturalism and materialism to show how culture itself is formed by nature. Bryant endorses a pan-ecological theory of being, arguing that societies are ecosystems that can only be understood by considering nonhuman material agencies such as rivers and mountain ranges alongside signifying agencies such as discourses, narratives and ideologies.

Guerrilla Metaphysics

Phenomenology and the Carpentry of Things

Author: Graham Harman

Publisher: Open Court

ISBN: 0812697723

Category: Philosophy

Page: 280

View: 9822

In Guerrilla Metaphysics, Graham Harman develops further the object-oriented philosophy first proposed in Tool-Being. Today’s fashionable philosophies often treat metaphysics as a petrified relic of the past, and hold that future progress requires an ever further abandonment of all claims to discuss reality in itself. Guerrilla Metaphysics makes the opposite assertion, challenging the dominant "philosophy of access" (both continental and analytic) that remains quarantined in discussions of language, perception, or literary texts. Philosophy needs a fresh resurgence of the things themselves—not merely the words or appearances themselves. Once these themes are adapted to the needs of an object-oriented philosophy, what emerges is a brand new type of metaphysics—a "guerrilla metaphysics."

Speculative Grace

Bruno Latour and Object-Oriented Theology

Author: Adam S. Miller

Publisher: Fordham Univ Press

ISBN: 0823251500

Category: Philosophy

Page: 166

View: 7409

This book models an object-oriented approach to grace. It experimentally ports a traditional Christian understanding of grace out of a top-down, theistic ontology and into a bottom-up, agent-based ontology. A systematic account of Bruno Latour's experimental, agent-based approach to metaphysics sets the object-oriented stage.

Being Ecological

Author: Timothy Morton

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0241274249

Category: Science

Page: 240

View: 7227

'To read Being Ecological is to be caught up in a brilliant display of intellectual pyrotechnics' P.D.Smith, Guardian Why is everything we think we know about ecology wrong? Is there really any difference between 'humans' and 'nature'? Does this mean we even have a future? Don't care about ecology? This book is for you. Timothy Morton, who has been called 'Our most popular guide to the new epoch' (Guardian), sets out to show us that whether we know it or not, we already have the capacity and the will to change the way we understand the place of humans in the world, and our very understanding of the term 'ecology'. A cross-disciplinarian who has collaborated with everyone from Björk to Hans Ulrich Obrist, Morton is also a member of the object-oriented philosophy movement, a group of forward-looking thinkers who are grappling with modern-day notions of subjectivity and objectivity, while also offering fascinating new understandings of Heidegger and Kant. Calling the volume a book containing 'no ecological facts', Morton confronts the 'information dump' fatigue of the digital age, and offers an invigorated approach to creating a liveable future.

Immaterialism

Objects and Social Theory

Author: Graham Harman

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1509501002

Category: Philosophy

Page: 140

View: 5277

What objects exist in the social world and how should we understand them? Is a specific Pizza Hut restaurant as real as the employees, tables, napkins and pizzas of which it is composed, and as real as the Pizza Hut corporation with its headquarters in Wichita, the United States, the planet Earth and the social and economic impact of the restaurant on the lives of its employees and customers? In this book the founder of object-oriented philosophy develops his approach in order to shed light on the nature and status of objects in social life. While it is often assumed that an interest in objects amounts to a form of materialism, Harman rejects this view and develops instead an “immaterialist” method. By examining the work of leading contemporary thinkers such as Bruno Latour and Levi Bryant, he develops a forceful critique of ‘actor-network theory’. In an extended discussion of Leibniz’s famous example of the Dutch East India Company, Harman argues that this company qualifies for objecthood neither through ‘what it is’ or ‘what it does’, but through its irreducibility to either of these forms. The phases of its life, argues Harman, are not demarcated primarily by dramatic incidents but by moments of symbiosis, a term he draws from the biologist Lynn Margulis. This book provides a key counterpoint to the now ubiquitous social theories of constant change, holistic networks, performative identities, and the construction of things by human practice. It will appeal to anyone interested in cutting-edge debates in philosophy and social and cultural theory.

Alien Phenomenology, Or, What It's Like to be a Thing

Author: Ian Bogost

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 0816678979

Category: Philosophy

Page: 166

View: 8701

Examines the author's idea of object-oriented philosophy, wherein things, and how they interact with one another, are the center of philosophical interest.

Nothing

Three Inquiries in Buddhism

Author: Marcus Boon,Eric Cazdyn,Timothy Morton

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022623326X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 283

View: 9454

Though contemporary European philosophy and critical theory have long had a robust engagement with Christianity, there has been no similar engagement with Buddhism—a surprising lack, given Buddhism's global reach and obvious affinities with much of Continental philosophy. This volume fills that gap, bringing together three scholars to offer individual, distinct, yet complementary philosophical takes on Buddhism. Focused on “nothing”—essential to Buddhism, of course, but also a key concept in critical theory from Hegel and Marx through deconstruction, queer theory, and contemporary speculative philosophy—the book explores different ways of rethinking Buddhism's nothing. Through an elaboration of “sunyata,” or emptiness, in both critical and Buddhist traditions; an examination of the problem of praxis in Buddhism, Marxism, and psychoanalysis; and an explication of a “Buddaphobia” that is rooted in modern anxieties about nothingness, Marcus Boon, Eric Cazdyn, and Timothy Morton open up new spaces in which the radical cores of Buddhism and critical theory are renewed and revealed.

The Quadruple Object

Author: N.A

Publisher: John Hunt Publishing

ISBN: 1780990049

Category: PHILOSOPHY

Page: 157

View: 3416

In this book the metaphysical system of Graham Harman is presented in lucid form, aided by helpful diagrams. In Chapter 1, Harman gives his most forceful critique to date of philosophies that reject objects as a primary reality.

Object Oriented Philosophy: The Noumenon's New Clothes

Author: Peter Wolfendale

Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc

ISBN: 0993045804

Category: Education

Page: N.A

View: 5712

How does the patience and rigour of philosophical explanation fare when confronted with an irrepressible desire to commune with the object and to escape the subjective perplexities of reference, meaning and sense? Moving beyond the hype and the inflated claims made for 'Object-Oriented' thought, Peter Wolfendale considers its emergence in the light of the intertwined legacies of twentieth-century analytic and Continental traditions. Both a remarkably clear explication of the tenets of OOP and an acute critique of the movement's ramifications for philosophy today, Object-Oriented Philosophy is a major engagement with one of the most prevalent trends in recent philosophy.

Ecology Without Nature

Rethinking Environmental Aesthetics

Author: Timothy Morton

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674024342

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 249

View: 7603

In Ecology without Nature, Timothy Morton argues that the chief stumbling block to environmental thinking is the image of nature itself. Ecological writers propose a new worldview, but their very zeal to preserve the natural world leads them away from the "nature" they revere. The problem is a symptom of the ecological catastrophe in which we are living. Morton sets out a seeming paradox: to have a properly ecological view, we must relinquish the idea of nature once and for all. Ecology without Nature investigates our ecological assumptions in a way that is provocative and deeply engaging. Ranging widely in eighteenth-century through contemporary philosophy, culture, and history, he explores the value of art in imagining environmental projects for the future. Morton develops a fresh vocabulary for reading "environmentality" in artistic form as well as content, and traces the contexts of ecological constructs through the history of capitalism. From John Clare to John Cage, from Kierkegaard to Kristeva, from The Lord of the Rings to electronic life forms, Ecology without Nature widens our view of ecological criticism, and deepens our understanding of ecology itself. Instead of trying to use an idea of nature to heal what society has damaged, Morton sets out a radical new form of ecological criticism: "dark ecology."

Technic and Magic

The Reconstruction of Reality

Author: Federico Campagna

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1350044032

Category: Philosophy

Page: 256

View: 5124

We take for granted that only certain kind of things exist – electrons but not angels, passports but not nymphs. This is what we understand as 'reality'. But in fact, 'reality' varies with each era of the world, in turn shaping the field of what is possible to do, think and imagine. Our contemporary age has embraced a troubling and painful form of reality: Technic. Under Technic, the foundations of reality begin to crumble, shrinking the field of the possible and freezing our lives in an anguished state of paralysis. Technic and Magic shows that the way out of the present deadlock lies much deeper than debates on politics or economics. By drawing from an array of Northern and Southern sources – spanning from Heidegger, Junger and Stirner's philosophies, through Pessoa's poetry, to Advaita Vedanta, Bhartrhari, Ibn Arabi, Suhrawardi and Mulla Sadra's theosophies – Magic is presented as an alternative system of reality to Technic. While Technic attempts to capture the world through an 'absolute language', Magic centres its reconstruction of the world around the notion of the 'ineffable' that lies at the heart of existence. Technic and Magic is an original philosophical work, and a timely cultural intervention. It disturbs our understanding of the structure of reality, while restoring it in a new form. This is possibly the most radical act: if we wish to change our world, first we have to change the idea of 'reality' that defines it.

Arts of Living on a Damaged Planet

Ghosts and Monsters of the Anthropocene

Author: Anna Lowenhaupt Tsing,Nils Bubandt,Elaine Gan,Heather Anne Swanson

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 1452954496

Category: Science

Page: 368

View: 2703

Living on a damaged planet challenges who we are and where we live. This timely anthology calls on twenty eminent humanists and scientists to revitalize curiosity, observation, and transdisciplinary conversation about life on earth. As human-induced environmental change threatens multispecies livability, Arts of Living on a Damaged Planet puts forward a bold proposal: entangled histories, situated narratives, and thick descriptions offer urgent “arts of living.” Included are essays by scholars in anthropology, ecology, science studies, art, literature, and bioinformatics who posit critical and creative tools for collaborative survival in a more-than-human Anthropocene. The essays are organized around two key figures that also serve as the publication’s two openings: Ghosts, or landscapes haunted by the violences of modernity; and Monsters, or interspecies and intraspecies sociality. Ghosts and Monsters are tentacular, windy, and arboreal arts that invite readers to encounter ants, lichen, rocks, electrons, flying foxes, salmon, chestnut trees, mud volcanoes, border zones, graves, radioactive waste—in short, the wonders and terrors of an unintended epoch. Contributors: Karen Barad, U of California, Santa Cruz; Kate Brown, U of Maryland, Baltimore; Carla Freccero, U of California, Santa Cruz; Peter Funch, Aarhus U; Scott F. Gilbert, Swarthmore College; Deborah M. Gordon, Stanford U; Donna J. Haraway, U of California, Santa Cruz; Andreas Hejnol, U of Bergen, Norway; Ursula K. Le Guin; Marianne Elisabeth Lien, U of Oslo; Andrew Mathews, U of California, Santa Cruz; Margaret McFall-Ngai, U of Hawaii, Manoa; Ingrid M. Parker, U of California, Santa Cruz; Mary Louise Pratt, NYU; Anne Pringle, U of Wisconsin, Madison; Deborah Bird Rose, U of New South Wales, Sydney; Dorion Sagan; Lesley Stern, U of California, San Diego; Jens-Christian Svenning, Aarhus U.

Tool-Being

Heidegger and the Metaphysics of Objects

Author: Graham Harman

Publisher: Open Court

ISBN: 0812697731

Category: Philosophy

Page: 256

View: 9678

Tool-Being offers a new assessment of Martin Heidegger's famous tool-analysis, and with it, an audacious reappraisal of Heidegger's legacy to twenty-first-century philosophy. Every reader of Being and Time is familiar with the opposition between readiness-to-hand (Zuhandenheit) and presence-at-hand (Vorhandenheit), but commentators usually follow Heidegger's wishes in giving this distinction a limited scope, as if it applied only to tools in a narrow sense. Graham Harman contests Heidegger's own interpretation of tool-being, arguing that the opposition between tool and broken tool is not merely a provisional stage in his philosophy, but rather its living core. The extended concept of tool-being developed here leads us not to a theory of human practical activity but to an ontology of objects themselves. Tool-Being urges a fresh and concrete research into the secret contours of objects. Written in a lively and colorful style, it will be of great interest to anyone intrigued by Heidegger and anyone open to new trends in present-day philosophy.

Speculation V

Aesthetics in the 21st Century

Author: Ridvan Askin,Paul J. Ennis,Andreas Hägler,Philip Schweighauser

Publisher: punctum books

ISBN: 0692203168

Category: Philosophy

Page: 474

View: 5820

Ever since the turn of the century aesthetics has steadily gained momentum as a central field of study across the disciplines. No longer sidelined, aesthetics has grown in confidence. While this recent development brings with it a return to the work of the canonical authors (most notably Baumgarten and Kant), some contemporary scholars reject the traditional focus on epistemology and theorize aesthetics in its ontological connotations. It is according to this shift that speculative realists have proclaimed aesthetics as “first philosophy” and as speculative in nature. With speculative realism aesthetics no longer necessarily implies human agents. This is in alignment with the general speculative realist framework for thinking all kinds of processes, entities, and objects as free from our allpervasive anthropocentrism which states, always, that everything is “for us.” This special issue of Speculations: A Journal of Speculative Realism explores the ramifications of what could be termed the new speculative aesthetics. In doing so, it stages a three-fold encounter: between aesthetics and speculation, between speculative realism and its (possible) precursors, and between speculative realism and art and literature. Speculations V includes: “Introduction: Aesthetics after the Speculative Turn,” by Ridvan Askin, Andreas Hägler, and Philipp Schweighauser Part 1: The Art of Theory “Non-Phenomenological Thought,” by Steven Shaviro — “Beauty, the Will to Power, and Life as Artwork: Aesthetico-Speculative Realism in Nietzsche and Whitehead,” by Theodor Leiber and Kirsten Voigt Sellars — “Contra Deleuze on Intuitive Knowledge,” by Matija Jelača — “Not Kant, Not Now: Another Sublime,” by Claire Colebrook — “Speculative Aesthetics and Object-Oriented Inquiry (OOI),” by N. Katherine Hayles — “Actual Qualities of Imaginative Things: Notes towards an Object-Oriented Literary Theory,” by Jon Cogburn and Mark Allan Ohm — “Speculative Experiments: What if Simondon and Harman Individuate Together?” by Miguel Penas López Part 2: The Theory of Art “Greenberg, Duchamp, and the Next Avant-Garde,” by Graham Harman — “Not Objects so Much As Images: A Response to Graham Harman’s ‘Greenberg, Duchamp, and the Next Avant-Garde’,” by Bettina Funcke — “Strategic Invisibility: The Zero Point of Modernism and the Avant-Garde,” by Thomas Gokey — “The Anxiousness of Objects and Artworks 2: (Iso)Morphism, Anti-Literalism and Presentness,” by Robert Jackson — “The Alien Aesthetic of Speculative Realism, or, How Interpretation Lost the Battle to Materiality and How Comfortable this Is to Humans,” by Roberto Simanowski — “Art and Guerrilla Metaphysics: Graham Harman and Aesthetics as First Philosophy,” by Francis Halsall — “Images I Cannot See,” by Magdalena Wisniowska Disegno — “A Speculative Constructivist Interpretation,” by Sjoerd van Tuinen

Art and Objects

Author: Graham Harman

Publisher: Polity

ISBN: 9781509512676

Category: Philosophy

Page: 240

View: 4974

In this book, the founder of object-oriented ontology develops his view that aesthetics is the central discipline of philosophy. Whereas science must attempt to grasp an object in terms of its observable qualities, philosophy and art cannot proceed in this way because they don't have direct access to their objects. Hence philosophy shares the same fate as art in being compelled to communicate indirectly, allusively, or elliptically, rather than in the clear propositional terms that are often taken – wrongly – to be the sole stuff of genuine philosophy. Conceiving of philosophy and art in this way allows us to reread key debates in aesthetic theory and to view art history in a different way. The formalist criticism of Greenberg and Fried is rejected for its refusal to embrace the innate theatricality and deep multiplicity of every artwork. This has consequences for art criticism, making pictorial content more important than formalism thinks but less entwined with the social sphere than anti-formalism holds. It has consequences for art history too, as the surrealists, David, and Poussin, among others, gain in importance. The close link between aesthetics and ontology also invites a new periodization of modern philosophy as a whole, and the habitual turn away from Kant’s thing-in-itself towards an increase in philosophical "immanence" is shown to be a false dawn. This major work will be of great interest to students and scholars of philosophy, aesthetics, art history and cultural theory.

Hyperobjects

Philosophy and Ecology after the End of the World

Author: Timothy Morton

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 145294055X

Category: Philosophy

Page: 240

View: 2816

Having set global warming in irreversible motion, we are facing the possibility of ecological catastrophe. But the environmental emergency is also a crisis for our philosophical habits of thought, confronting us with a problem that seems to defy not only our control but also our understanding. Global warming is perhaps the most dramatic example of what Timothy Morton calls “hyperobjects”—entities of such vast temporal and spatial dimensions that they defeat traditional ideas about what a thing is in the first place. In this book, Morton explains what hyperobjects are and their impact on how we think, how we coexist with one another and with nonhumans, and how we experience our politics, ethics, and art. Moving fluidly between philosophy, science, literature, visual and conceptual art, and popular culture, the book argues that hyperobjects show that the end of the world has already occurred in the sense that concepts such as world, nature, and even environment are no longer a meaningful horizon against which human events take place. Instead of inhabiting a world, we find ourselves inside a number of hyperobjects, such as climate, nuclear weapons, evolution, or relativity. Such objects put unbearable strains on our normal ways of reasoning. Insisting that we have to reinvent how we think to even begin to comprehend the world we now live in, Hyperobjects takes the first steps, outlining a genuinely postmodern ecological approach to thought and action.

Romantic Realities

Speculative Realism and British Romanticism

Author: Evan Gottlieb

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 074869143X

Category: Philosophy

Page: 256

View: 7271

Reads Romantic literature through the lens of 21st century speculative realist philosophyRead and download the series editor's preface (by Graham Harman) and the Introduction to Romantic Realities for free nowSpeculative realism is one of the most exciting, influential and controversial new branches of philosophy to emerge in recent years. Now, Evan Gottlieb shows that the speculative realism movement bears striking a resemblance to the ideas and beliefs of the best-known British poets of the Romantic era.Romantic Realities analyses the parallels and echoes between the ideas of the most influential contemporary practitioners of speculative realism and the poetry and poetics of the most innovative Romantic poets. In doing so, it introduces you to the intellectual precedents and contemporary stakes of speculative realism, together with new understandings of the philosophical underpinnings and far-reaching insights of British Romanticism.Readings include:The poetry and poetics of Wordsworth in relation to Graham Harman's object-oriented ontology and Timothy Morton's dark ecologyColeridge's poems and ideas in relation to Ray Brassier's philosophical nihilism and Iain Hamilton Grant's revisionist readings of SchellingShelley's oeuvre in relation to Quentin Meillassoux's radical immanentism and Manuel DeLanda's process ontologyByron's best-known poems in relation to Alain Badiou's truth procedures and Bruno Latour's actor-network-theoryKeats' oeuvre in relation to Levi Bryant's onticology and Ian Bogost's alien phenomenology"e;

Rejoicing

Or the Torments of Religious Speech

Author: Bruno Latour

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0745671330

Category: Religion

Page: 200

View: 5036

Bruno Latour’s long term project is to compare the felicity and infelicity conditions of the different values dearest to the heart of those who have ‘never been modern’. According to him, this is the only way to develop an anthropology of the Moderns. After his work on science, on technology and, more recently, on law, this book explores the truth conditions of religious speech acts. Even though there is no question that religion is one of the values that has been intensely cherished in the course of history, it’s also clear that it has become immensely difficult to tune in to its highly specific mode of enunciation. Every effort to speak in the right key sounds awkward, reactionary, pious or simply empty. Hence the necessity of devising a way of writing that brings to the fore this elusive form of speech to render it audible again. In this highly original book, the author offers a completely different tack on the endless ‘science and religion’ conflict by protecting them both from the confusion with the notion of information. Like The Making of Law, this book is one more attempt at developing this ‘inquiry on modes of existence’ that provides an alternative definition of society.