Revolution and Revolutionaries

Guerrilla Movements in Latin America

Author: Daniel Castro

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 1461643104

Category: History

Page: 236

View: 5636

Few publications cover the full span of the history of revolutionary movements in Latin America. In Revolution and Revolutionaries, editor Daniel Castro examines all aspects of guerrilla warfare-from revolutionary programs to the repressive tactics used by various governments to rid themselves of the threats presented by revolutionary movements. In addition to illustrating specific cases of guerrilla struggles, Revolution and Revolutionaries also analyzes the political and social conditions that made the outbreak of revolutionary movements throughout the region unavoidable. Finally, Castro examines the remaining guerrilla movements still active in Latin America as the century comes to a close. Revolution and Revolutionaries revives the debate about the viability of revolutionary violence in Latin America, and will interest those studying Latin American history and sociology, and political science.

Latin America in the Era of the Cuban Revolution and Beyond, 3rd Edition

Author: Thomas C. Wright

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440857687

Category: Political Science

Page: 265

View: 9292

An in-depth explanation of how the Cuban Revolution dictated Latin American politics and U.S.-Latin American relations from the 1950s to the present, including widespread democratization and the rise of the "Pink Tide." • Explains how and why Fidel Castro established communism in Cuba, his motivations for taking Cuba into the Soviet camp, and the consequences of both of these actions • Documents how the repression, dictatorships, and human rights violations of the 1970s and 1980s were unanticipated outcomes of the Cuban Revolution • Clarifies the often confusing and contradictory trends in Latin American political history from the 1950s to the present • Examines the "Pink Tide" of recent leftist governments, including those of Hugo Chávez in Venezuela and Evo Morales in Bolivia

A Century of Revolution

Insurgent and Counterinsurgent Violence during Latin America’s Long Cold War

Author: Gilbert M. Joseph,Greg Grandin

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822392852

Category: History

Page: 456

View: 900

Latin America experienced an epochal cycle of revolutionary upheavals and insurgencies during the twentieth century, from the Mexican Revolution of 1910 through the mobilizations and terror in Central America, the Southern Cone, and the Andes during the 1970s and 1980s. In his introduction to A Century of Revolution, Greg Grandin argues that the dynamics of political violence and terror in Latin America are so recognizable in their enforcement of domination, their generation and maintenance of social exclusion, and their propulsion of historical change, that historians have tended to take them for granted, leaving unexamined important questions regarding their form and meaning. The essays in this groundbreaking collection take up these questions, providing a sociologically and historically nuanced view of the ideological hardening and accelerated polarization that marked Latin America’s twentieth century. Attentive to the interplay among overlapping local, regional, national, and international fields of power, the contributors focus on the dialectical relations between revolutionary and counterrevolutionary processes and their unfolding in the context of U.S. hemispheric and global hegemony. Through their fine-grained analyses of events in Chile, Colombia, Cuba, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Peru, they suggest a framework for interpreting the experiential nature of political violence while also analyzing its historical causes and consequences. In so doing, they set a new agenda for the study of revolutionary change and political violence in twentieth-century Latin America. Contributors Michelle Chase Jeffrey L. Gould Greg Grandin Lillian Guerra Forrest Hylton Gilbert M. Joseph Friedrich Katz Thomas Miller Klubock Neil Larsen Arno J. Mayer Carlota McAllister Jocelyn Olcott Gerardo Rénique Corey Robin Peter Winn

Latin American Revolutionaries and the Arab World

From the Suez Canal to the Arab Spring

Author: Federico Vélez

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134804601

Category: Political Science

Page: 204

View: 7025

Recounting recent encounters between Latin American and Arab countries this unique volume explores how, despite both geographical and cultural distances, Latin American revolutionaries constructed an image of the Arab World as one sharing their own political views and interests. From the nationalization of the Suez Canal to Latin American perspectives on the Arab Spring Federico Vélez offers a fascinating historical and contemporary analysis on the behaviour of actors on the periphery of the international system. Contributing to debates regarding ideological and political autonomy the book provides a comprehensive historical account of relations between the countries of Latin America and the Middle East alongside new analysis on the ways marginalized states can sometimes build unlikely alliances in their attempts to challenge structures of power.

Authoritarian Regimes in Latin America

Dictators, Despots, and Tyrants

Author: Paul H. Lewis

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742537392

Category: Political Science

Page: 259

View: 4617

This thoughtful text describes how Latin America's authoritarian culture has been and continues to be reflected in a variety of governments, from the near-anarchy of the early regional bosses (caudillos), to all-powerful personalistic dictators or oligarchic machines, to contemporary mass-movement regimes like Castro's Cuba or Peron's Argentina. Taking a student-friendly chronological approach, Paul Lewis also analyzes how the internal dynamics of each historical phase of the region's development led to the next. He describes how dominant ideologies of the period were used to shape, and justify, each regime's power structure. Balanced yet cautious about the future of democracy in the region, this accessible book will be invaluable for courses on contemporary Latin America.

Twentieth-Century Latin American Revolutions

Author: Marc Becker

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442265884

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 9748

Revolutions are a commonly studied but only vaguely understood historical phenomenon. This clear and concise text extends our understanding with a critical narrative analysis of key case studies: the 1910–1920 Mexican Revolution; the 1944–1954 Guatemalan Spring; the 1952–1964 MNR-led revolution in Bolivia; the Cuban Revolution that triumphed in 1959; the 1970–1973 Chilean path to socialism; the leftist Sandinistas in Nicaragua in power from 1979–1990; failed guerrilla movements in Colombia, El Salvador, and Peru; and the Bolivarian Revolution in Venezuela after Hugo Chávez’s election in 1998. Historian Marc Becker opens with a theoretical introduction to revolutionary movements, including a definition of what “revolution” means and an examination of factors necessary for a revolution to succeed. He analyzes revolutions through the lens of those who participated and explores the sociopolitical conditions that led to a revolutionary situation, the differing responses to those conditions, and the outcomes of those political changes. Each case study provides an interpretive explanation of the historical context in which each movement emerged, its main goals and achievements, its shortcomings, its outcome, and its legacy. The book concludes with an analysis of how elected leftist governments in the twenty-first century continue to struggle with issues that revolutionaries confronted throughout the twentieth century.

Comandante Che

Guerrilla Soldier, Commander, and Strategist, 1956-1967

Author: Paul J. Dosal

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271046433

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: N.A

View: 5142

The victory of Fidel Castro&’s rebel army in Cuba was due in no small part to the training, strategy, and leadership provided by Ernesto Che Guevara. Despite the deluge of biographies, memoirs, and documentaries that appeared in 1997 on the thirtieth anniversary of Guevara&’s death, his military career remains shrouded in mystery. Comandante Che is the first book designed specifically to provide an objective evaluation of Guevara&’s record as a guerrilla soldier, commander, and strategist from his first skirmish in Cuba to his defeat in Bolivia eleven years later. Using new evidence from Guevara&’s previously unpublished campaign diaries and declassified CIA documents, Paul Dosal reassesses Guevara&’s impact as a guerrilla warrior and theorist, comparing his accomplishments with those of other guerrilla leaders with whom he has been ranked, including Colonel T. E. Lawrence, Mao Tse-Tung, and General Vo Nguyen Giap. This reassessment reveals that Guevara was often underrated as a conventional military strategist, overrated as a guerrilla commander, and misrepresented as a guerrilla theorist. Guevara achieved his greatest military victory by applying a conventional military strategy in the final stages of the Cuban Revolution, orchestrating the defensive campaign that held off the Cuban army in the summer of 1958. As a guerrilla commander, he scored impressive victories in ambush after ambush in Bolivia, but in winning the battles he lost the war. He violated most of his own precepts during the Bolivian campaign, compelling analysts to question the validity of both his strategies and his command skills. Though he is credited with developing foco theory, Guevara never attempted to advance a new theory of guerrilla warfare. He was a fighter, not a theorist. He wanted to defeat American imperialism by launching guerrilla campaigns simultaneously in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, but his tricontinental strategy resulted in failures first in the Congo and then in Bolivia. Comandante Che presents the full record of Guevara&’s successes and failures, separating myth from reality about one of the twentieth century&’s most controversial revolutionary figures.

Women, Guerrillas, and Love

Understanding War in Central America

Author: N.A

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 9780816626267

Category: Fiction

Page: 199

View: 9744

"The 14 chapters posit a regendering of revolutionary poetics, which is accomplished by reworking concepts such as '(new)man,' 'woman,' and 'subaltern.' The predictability of Rodrâiguez's arguments and dated historical referents do not detract from solidanalyses, like those in chapter eight regarding Mario Roberto Morales' 'El esplendor de la pirâamide' and those in the next chapter on Oreamuno's 'La ruta de su evasiâon.' The author focuses on her strength - narratives from Cuba and her native Nicaragua"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. 58.

Latin America

A Bibliography of Works in English from 1970 to the Present

Author: Juan Manuel Pérez

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: N.A

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 588

View: 8901

Killing England

The Brutal Struggle for American Independence

Author: Bill O'Reilly,Martin Dugard

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 1627790659

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 1690

The Revolutionary War as never told before. The breathtaking latest installment in Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard’s mega-bestselling Killing series transports readers to the most important era in our nation’s history, the Revolutionary War. Told through the eyes of George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, and Great Britain’s King George III, Killing England chronicles the path to independence in gripping detail, taking the reader from the battlefields of America to the royal courts of Europe. What started as protest and unrest in the colonies soon escalated to a world war with devastating casualties. O’Reilly and Dugard recreate the war’s landmark battles, including Bunker Hill, Long Island, Saratoga, and Yorktown, revealing the savagery of hand-to-hand combat and the often brutal conditions under which these brave American soldiers lived and fought. Also here is the reckless treachery of Benedict Arnold and the daring guerilla tactics of the “Swamp Fox” Frances Marion. A must read, Killing England reminds one and all how the course of history can be changed through the courage and determination of those intent on doing the impossible.

The Jaguar Smile

A Nicaraguan Journey

Author: Salman Rushdie

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 0307786668

Category: Travel

Page: 160

View: 6841

“I did not go to Nicaragua intending to write a book, or, indeed, to write at all: but my encounter with the place affected me so deeply that in the end I had no choice.” So notes Salman Rushdie in his first work of nonfiction, a book as imaginative and meaningful as his acclaimed novels. In The Jaguar Smile, Rushdie paints a brilliantly sharp and haunting portrait of the people, the politics, the terrain, and the poetry of “a country in which the ancient, opposing forces of creation and destruction were in violent collision.” Recounting his travels there in 1986, in the midst of America’s behind-the-scenes war against the Sandinistas, Rushdie reveals a nation resounding to the clashes between government and individuals, history and morality.

Humanities

Author: Lawrence Boudon

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 9780292706088

Category: Social Science

Page: 976

View: 3412

"The one source that sets reference collections on Latin American studies apart from all other geographic areas of the world.... The Handbook has provided scholars interested in Latin America with a bibliographical source of a quality unavailable to scholars in most other branches of area studies." —Latin American Research Review Beginning with volume 41 (1979), the University of Texas Press became the publisher of the Handbook of Latin American Studies, the most comprehensive annual bibliography in the field. Compiled by the Hispanic Division of the Library of Congress and annotated by a corps of more than 130 specialists in various disciplines, the Handbook alternates from year to year between social sciences and humanities. The Handbook annotates works on Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean and the Guianas, Spanish South America, and Brazil, as well as materials covering Latin America as a whole. Most of the subsections are preceded by introductory essays that serve as biannual evaluations of the literature and research under way in specialized areas. The Handbook of Latin American Studies is the oldest continuing reference work in the field. Lawrence Boudon, of the Library of Congress Hispanic Division, has been the editor since 2000, and Katherine D. McCann has been assistant editor since 1999. The subject categories for Volume 60 are as follows: Art History (including ethnohistory) Literature (including translations from the Spanish and Portuguese) Music Philosophy: Latin American Thought

Guerrilla Movements in Latin America

Author: Richard Gott

Publisher: Seagull Books Pvt Ltd

ISBN: 9781905422593

Category: Political Science

Page: 575

View: 4819

Che Guevara´s death began a legend and closed an era. Based directly on the documents produced by the guerrillas themselves, this is the first comprehensive history of that era. In theory, immense disparity in local wealth combined with the heavy hand of "Yankee imperialism" laid the ground for revolution. In practice, however, circumstances conspired to thwart the plans of the revolutionary guerrillas. The Latin American Left was, and remains, seriously divided between Moscow-oriented Communists, Trotskyists, Maoists, pro-Cubans and simple nationalists. The rural guerrillas sought to spark off revolution through armed struggle. Yet they found themselves increasingly involved in ideological conflict with the Communists in the cities whilst rural support was rarely forthcoming with the peasants more mystified than enlightened by revolutionary rhetoric. Meanwhile government forces, with military intelligence support from the United States, evolved steadily more efficient techniques for dealing with the guerrillas.

Latin America During World War II

Author: Thomas M. Leonard,John F. Bratzel

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 1461638623

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 4216

The first full-length study of World War II from the Latin American perspective, this unique volume offers an in-depth analysis of the region during wartime. Each country responded to World War II according to its own national interests, which often conflicted with those of the Allies, including the United States. The contributors systematically consider how each country dealt with commonly shared problems: the Axis threat to the national order, the extent of military cooperation with the Allies, and the war's impact on the national economy and domestic political and social structures. Drawing on both U.S. and Latin American primary sources, the book offers a rigorous comparison of the wartime experiences of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Central America, Gran Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, Panama, and Puerto Rico.

The Mexican Revolution, 1910-1940

Author: Michael J. Gonzales

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 082632780X

Category: History

Page: 307

View: 2806

Examines Mexican politics and government from the dictatorship of General Porfirio Dâiaz to the presidency of General Lâazaro Câardenas.

Sapiens

A Brief History of Humankind

Author: Yuval Noah Harari

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062316109

Category: Science

Page: 464

View: 4959

New York Times Bestseller A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.” One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us? Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas. Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become? Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.

The Country Under My Skin

A Memoir of Love and War

Author: Gioconda Belli

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing UK

ISBN: 9780747558996

Category: Authors, Nicaraguan

Page: 380

View: 8813

A true story of love and politics during one of the most turbulent periods in twentieth-century history