Sacking the Citadel

The History, Theory and Practice of the Classic Bishop Sacrifice

Author: Jon Edwards

Publisher: Russell Enterprises Incorporated

ISBN: 9781888690743

Category: Games

Page: 400

View: 9750

Four hundred years ago, an Italian chess master, Gioachino Greco, discovered an extraordinary bishop sacrifice on h7 that often leads to checkmate or a significant material advantage. More amazing still, he recorded the idea! This book chronicles the history of that idea, what many have come to call the Classic Bishop sacrifice, from its discovery and formative years through its remarkably complex uses in modern chess. During the past century, several annotators have attempted to explain the circumstances under which the sacrifice works, and when it doesnt. Edwards reviews their efforts and, in a spectacular ninth chapter, provides a modern classification. His taxonomy of the sacrifice is comprehensive and full of pleasant surprises for beginners and even accomplished masters. This book represents a thematic approach to chess tactics and strategy. Careful readers will suddenly discover that they are able, quickly and accurately, to see 5-10 moves or more ahead in these lines. Here you will find hundreds of carefully annotated games. Learn from brilliant moves and strategies; and take full advantage of others instructive mistakes.

The Citadel

A Novel

Author: AJ Cronin

Publisher: Rosetta Books

ISBN: 0795345518

Category: Fiction

Page: 368

View: 1726

A groundbreaking novel of its time and a National Book Award winner: “[A] fine, honest, and moving a study of a young doctor” (Atlantic Monthly). The Citadel follows the life of Andrew Manson, a young and idealistic Scottish doctor, as he navigates the challenges of practicing medicine across interwar Wales and England. Based on A.J. Cronin’s own experiences as a physician, this book boldly confronts traditional medical ethics, and has been noted as one of the inspirations for the formation of the National Health Service. This story has been adapted into several successful film, radio, and television productions around the world, including the Oscar-nominated 1938 film starring Robert Donat, Rosalind Russell, Ralph Richardson, and Rex Harrison. “One of the most popular authors in the English speaking world.” —The New York Times

ChessBase Complete

Chess in the Digital Age

Author: Jon Edwards

Publisher: Russell Enterprises Incorporated

ISBN: 9781936490547

Category: Games

Page: 352

View: 821

ChessBase Step-by-Step There s a general recognition among chess players at all levels that the ChessBase software application is critical for serious chess improvement, but many chess players are intimidated by the software. Now, for the first time, former U.S. correspondence champion Jon Edwards has created real-life scenarios that focus upon why the software is so important for chess players of every class, along with clear explanations of how to use ChessBase. The author will show you how, with ChessBase: (1) Opening preparation is quick, comprehensive, fully-up-to-date, and effective; (2) You can quickly locate and review important games in every opening, middlegame type, and endgame; (3) You can instantly see what worldwide engines think about most opening and many middlegame positions; (4) You can instantly see where you and your opponents erred; (5) You can reliably prepare chess books for publication in print or on the web And much, much more! There is in fact no aspect of using ChessBase which Edwards does not cover. It is all here, and all in one volume! Know simply that ChessBase is instrumental to every aspect of chess. This book explains how the software can help you to improve your play, your learning, your teaching, your writing, or simply your love of and enthusiasm for the game. Jon Edwards explains all that you will need to know with concrete examples and simple instructions. After that, how strong a chess player, how good a chess teacher, how good a chess author you become is truly up to you."

The Poetics of Appearance in the Attic Korai

Author: Mary Stieber

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292773498

Category: Art

Page: 278

View: 3193

Some of the loveliest works of Archaic art were the Athenian korai—sculptures of beautiful young women presenting offerings to the goddess Athena that stood on the Acropolis. Sculpted in the sixth and early fifth centuries B.C., they served as votives until Persians sacked the citadel in 480/79 B.C. Subsequently, they were buried as a group and forgotten for nearly twenty-four centuries, until archaeologists excavated them in the 1880s. Today, they are among the treasures of the Acropolis Museum. Mary Stieber takes a fresh look at the Attic korai in this book. Challenging the longstanding view that the sculptures are generic female images, she persuasively argues that they are instead highly individualized, mimetically realistic representations of Archaic young women, perhaps even portraits of real people. Marshalling a wide array of visual and literary evidence to support her claims, she shows that while the korai lack the naturalism that characterizes later Classical art, they display a wealth and realism of detail that makes it impossible to view them as generic, idealized images. This iconoclastic interpretation of the Attic korai adds a new dimension to our understanding of Archaic art and to the distinction between realism and naturalism in the art of all periods.

Guerrilla Metaphysics

Phenomenology and the Carpentry of Things

Author: Graham Harman

Publisher: Open Court

ISBN: 0812697723

Category: Philosophy

Page: 280

View: 5640

In Guerrilla Metaphysics, Graham Harman develops further the object-oriented philosophy first proposed in Tool-Being. Today’s fashionable philosophies often treat metaphysics as a petrified relic of the past, and hold that future progress requires an ever further abandonment of all claims to discuss reality in itself. Guerrilla Metaphysics makes the opposite assertion, challenging the dominant "philosophy of access" (both continental and analytic) that remains quarantined in discussions of language, perception, or literary texts. Philosophy needs a fresh resurgence of the things themselves—not merely the words or appearances themselves. Once these themes are adapted to the needs of an object-oriented philosophy, what emerges is a brand new type of metaphysics—a "guerrilla metaphysics."

Lemprière's Dictionary

Author: Lawrence Norfolk

Publisher: Grove Press

ISBN: 9780802139870

Category: Fiction

Page: 529

View: 2007

An international best-seller and winner of the Somerset Maugham Prize, Lempriere's Dictionary is the debut novel from Lawrence Norfolk, one of England's most innovative, internationally acclaimed young authors. In eighteenth-century London, John Lempriere works feverishly on a celebrated dictionary of classical mythology that bears his name. He discovers a conspiracy against his family dating back 150 years. Told with the narrative drive of a political thriller and a Dickensian panorama of place and time, this astonishing tale encompasses the Great Voyages of Discovery, multinational financial conspiracies, and a motley cast of scholars and eccentrics, drunken aristocrats, whores and assassins, and octogenarian pirates, all brilliantly depicted across three continents and the world of classical mythology.

Imagining Marketing

Art, Aesthetics and the Avant-Garde

Author: Stephen Brown,Anthony Patterson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134565496

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 320

View: 3923

Imagination is a word that is widely used by marketing practitioners but rarely examined by marketing academics. This neglect is largely due to the imagination's 'artistic' connotations, which run counter to the 'scientific' mindset that dominates marketing scholarship. Of late, however, an artistic 'turn' has taken place in marketing research, and this topical study argues that the mantle of imagination has now passed on from the artist to the marketer. It contends, moreover, that the tools and techniques of artistic appreciation can be successfully applied to all manner of marketplace phenomena. Key features include: * the treatment of artistic artefacts as a source of marketing understanding * a detailed discussion surrounding the argument that marketers should adopt more imaginative modes of academic expression * an analysis of the kind of art that marketing is, and the place of imagination in marketing's artistic palette. This book provokes a new way of thinking about marketing, and will prove invaluable to marketing academics, researchers and practitioners.

Bxh7

Master Both Sides of Chess' Most Useful Piece Sacrifice in 5 Easy Lessons and 116 Exercises

Author: David Isaac Rudel

Publisher: Thinker Press

ISBN: 9781888710373

Category: Games

Page: 188

View: 8020

David Rudel's debut book, Zuke 'Em -the Colle- Zukertort Revolutionized, brought a fresh voice to chess in the summer of 2008. His clarity wooed class players while stronger readers applauded his creativity and determination in finding new tries for an advantage in lines long thought dead. Rudel now presents a work aimed at all chess players. Bxh7+ is not so much a book but a training kit demystifying Greco's sacrifice. Any serious player can now attain a fluency with this tactic exceeding that held by most masters. Five easy lessons present essential guidelines, tools, and tips for both attackers and defenders.

The Odyssey of Homer

Author: Homer

Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.

ISBN: 1616401478

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 8893

Translator name not noted above: Andrew Lang. Originally published between 1909 and 1917 under the name "Harvard Classics," this stupendous 51-volume set-a collection of the greatest writings from literature, philosophy, history, and mythology-was assembled by American academic CHARLES WILLIAM ELIOT (1834-1926), Harvard University's longest-serving president. Also known as "Dr. Eliot's Five Foot Shelf," it represented Eliot's belief that a basic liberal education could be gleaned by reading from an anthology of works that could fit on five feet of bookshelf. Volume XXII features a translation by Irish scholar SAMUEL HENRY BUTCHER (1850-1910) and Scottish academic ANDREW LANG (1844-1912) of the epic 8th-century BC Greek adventure The Odyssey, attributed to the poet Homer but originally told in oral form. The foundational text not merely of modern literature but of all of Western civilization, it is the story of the nine-year journey of the soldier Odysseus as he returns home to Ithaca after the Trojan War. Nearly three thousand years after it was first written, it remains as entertaining as it is edifying, and it absolutely required reading for anyone who wishes to be considered truly educated and literate.

The Odyssey of Homer

Author: Butcher,S.H..,Andrew Lang

Publisher: Biblo & Tannen Publishers

ISBN: 9780819628817

Category:

Page: 429

View: 5554

The Iliad

Author: Homer

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806185767

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 544

View: 8319

An accessible Iliad for twenty-first-century readers A classic of Western literature for three millennia, Homer’s Iliad captivates modern readers—as it did ancient listeners—with its tale of gods and warriors at the siege of Troy. Now Herbert Jordan’s line-for-line translation brilliantly renders the original Greek into English blank verse—the poetic form most closely resembling our spoken language. Raising the bar set by Richmond Lattimore in 1951, Jordan employs a pleasing five-beat meter and avoids unnecessary filler. Whereas other verse renditions are longer than the original, owing to the translators’ indulgence in personal poetics, Jordan avoids “line inflation.” The result, an economical translation, captures the force and vigor of the original poem. E. Christian Kopff’s introduction to this volume sets the stage and credits Jordan with conveying the action and movement of the Iliad in “contemporary language and a supple verse.” This new Iliad offers twenty-first-century readers the thrill of a timeless epic and affords instructors a much-needed alternative for literature surveys.

Lebanon

A History, 600 - 2011

Author: William Harris

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199986584

Category: Religion

Page: 400

View: 4729

In this impressive synthesis, William Harris narrates the history of the sectarian communities of Mount Lebanon and its vicinity. He offers a fresh perspective on the antecedents of modern multi-communal Lebanon, tracing the consolidation of Lebanon's Christian, Muslim, and Islamic derived sects from their origins between the sixth and eleventh centuries. The identities of Maronite Christians, Twelver Shia Muslims, and Druze, the mountain communities, developed alongside assertions of local chiefs under external powers from the Umayyads to the Ottomans. The chiefs began interacting in a common arena when Druze lord Fakhr al-Din Ma'n achieved domination of the mountain within the Ottoman imperial framework in the early seventeenth century. Harris knits together the subsequent interplay of the elite under the Sunni Muslim Shihab relatives of the Ma'ns after 1697 with demographic instability as Maronites overtook Shia as the largest community and expanded into Druze districts. By the 1840s many Maronites conceived the common arena as their patrimony. Maronite/Druze conflict ensued. Modern Lebanon arose out of European and Ottoman intervention in the 1860s to secure sectarian peace in a special province. In 1920, after the Ottoman collapse, France and the Maronites enlarged the province into the modern country, with a pluralism of communal minorities headed by Maronite Christians and Sunni Muslims. The book considers the flowering of this pluralism in the mid-twentieth century, and the strains of new demographic shifts and of social resentment in an open economy. External intrusions after the 1967 Arab-Israeli war rendered Lebanon's contradictions unmanageable and the country fell apart. Harris contends that Lebanon has not found a new equilibrium and has not transcended its sects. In the early twenty-first century there is an uneasy duality: Shia have largely recovered the weight they possessed in the sixteenth century, but Christians, Sunnis, and Druze are two-thirds of the country. This book offers readers a clear understanding of how modern Lebanon acquired its precarious social intricacy and its singular political character.

Kings and Captains

Variations on a Heroic Theme

Author: Charles Moorman

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813163773

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 7191

Charles Moorman reexamines several major works of the western heroic tradition: The Iliad, The Odyssey, Beowulf, The Song of Roland, The Nibelungenlied, the Norse sagas, and the Arthurian cycle. Disregarding the usual limited definitions which have controlled the study of heroic literature, he draws together these disparate works by proposing a theme common to them all: the opposition of two major figures whom he names king and captain. The figure of the king arises from the community with its need for responsible government, while the captain, derived from myth, is a highly individualistic, irresponsible heroic figure. The tension which Moorman sees between them is used as a means of reinterpreting the works under study. Though widely separated in time and cultural milieu, The Illiad, and The Song of Roland, for example, can be compared by interpreting both the Agamemnon-Achilles and the Oliver-Roland relationships as conflicts between king and captain. These essays will prove illuminating for layman and scholar alike.

Finding the Walls of Troy

Frank Calvert and Heinrich Schliemann at Hisarlik

Author: Susan Heuck Allen

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520208681

Category: Social Science

Page: 409

View: 6818

The relentlessly self-promoting amateur archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann took full credit for discovering Homer's Troy over one hundred years ago, and since then generations have thrilled to the tale of his ambitions and achievements. But Schliemann gained this status as an archaeological hero partly by deliberately eclipsing the man who had launched his career. Now, at long last, Susan Heuck Allen puts the record straight in this fascinating archaeological adventure that restores the British expatriate Frank Calvert to his rightful place in the story of the identification and excavation of Hisarlk, the site now thought to be Troy as described in the Iliad. Frank Calvert had lived in the Troad--in the northwest corner of Asia Minor--excavating there for fifteen years before Schliemann arrived and learning the local topography well. He was the first archaeologist to test the hypothesis that Hisarlk was the Troy of Hector and Helen. So that he would have unrestricted access to the site, he purchased part of the mound and was the first archaeologist to conduct excavations there. Running out of funds, he later interested Schliemann in the site. The thankless Schliemann stole Calvert's ideas, exploited his knowledge and advice, and finally stole Calvert's glory, in part by slandering him and denigrating his work. Allen corrects the record and does justice to a man who was a victim of his own integrity while giving a balanced treatment of Schliemann's true accomplishments. This meticulously researched book tells the story of Frank Calvert's development as an archaeologist, his adventures and discoveries. It focuses on the twists and turns of his turbulent relationship with the perfidious Schliemann, the resulting gains for archaeology, and the successful conclusion of their common quest. Allen has brought together a wide range of relevant published material as well as unpublished sources from archives, diaries, letters, and personal interviews to tell this gripping story. The relentlessly self-promoting amateur archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann took full credit for discovering Homer's Troy over one hundred years ago, and since then generations have thrilled to the tale of his ambitions and achievements. But Schliemann gained this status as an archaeological hero partly by deliberately eclipsing the man who had launched his career. Now, at long last, Susan Heuck Allen puts the record straight in this fascinating archaeological adventure that restores the British expatriate Frank Calvert to his rightful place in the story of the identification and excavation of Hisarlk, the site now thought to be Troy as described in the Iliad. Frank Calvert had lived in the Troad--in the northwest corner of Asia Minor--excavating there for fifteen years before Schliemann arrived and learning the local topography well. He was the first archaeologist to test the hypothesis that Hisarlk was the Troy of Hector and Helen. So that he would have unrestricted access to the site, he purchased part of the mound and was the first archaeologist to conduct excavations there. Running out of funds, he later interested Schliemann in the site. The thankless Schliemann stole Calvert's ideas, exploited his knowledge and advice, and finally stole Calvert's glory, in part by slandering him and denigrating his work. Allen corrects the record and does justice to a man who was a victim of his own integrity while giving a balanced treatment of Schliemann's true accomplishments. This meticulously researched book tells the story of Frank Calvert's development as an archaeologist, his adventures and discoveries. It focuses on the twists and turns of his turbulent relationship with the perfidious Schliemann, the resulting gains for archaeology, and the successful conclusion of their common quest. Allen has brought together a wide range of relevant published material as well as unpublished sources from archives, diaries, letters, and personal interviews to tell this gripping story.

The Boo

A Tribute to the Man Who Ruled the Citadel

Author: Pat Conroy

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 145320640X

Category: Fiction

Page: 202

View: 6353

The #1 New York Times–bestselling author’s story about life at the Citadel in the 1960s, a profound exploration of what it means to be a man of honor. Lt. Col. Nugent Courvoisie, known to the cadets as “the Boo,” is an imposing and inspiring leader at the South Carolina military academy, the Citadel. A harsh disciplinarian but a compassionate mentor, he guides and inspires his young charges. Cadet Peter Cates is an anomaly. He is a gifted writer, a talented basketball player, and a good student, but his outward successes do little to impress his abusive father. The Boo takes Cates under his wing, but their bond is threatened when they’re forced to confront an act of violence on campus. Drawn from Pat Conroy’s own experiences as a student at the Citadel, The Boo is an unforgettable story about duty, loyalty, and standing up for what is right in the face of overwhelming circumstances.

The History of Rome

Reprinted Entire, from the Last London Edition

Author: Thomas Arnold

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Rome

Page: 686

View: 2490

"Cast in Later Grecian Mould", Quintus of Smyrna's Reception of Homer in the Posthomerica

Author: N.A

Publisher: Stanford University

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 1434

This dissertation examines the relationship between the Homeric epics, the Iliad and the Odyssey, and Quintus of Smyrna's Posthomerica, a 14-book epic of the third century CE. It argues that Quintus bridges the narratives of the Iliad and the Odyssey and redeploys Homeric style in order to re-activate the cultural power of Homer under the Roman Empire. The first chapter analyzes Quintus' depiction of the Muses. The ways in which the goddesses are represented encodes the contemporary conflict of constructing a Greek identity as panhellenic or epichoric in the language of the past. This demonstrates the Posthomerica's deep engagement with the position of Hellenism and its connection to the past. The lack of an opening invocation to the Muses is part of Quintus' strategy for tapping into Homeric power: he connects the Iliad with the Posthomerica but also respects the boundaries of the Homeric text. The second chapter explores how Quintus occasionally draws his audience's gaze away from the primary narrative of the heroic past and towards their own present. This is done through landscapes, a simile involving the arena, Odysseus' testudo maneuver, and Calchas' prophecy about the Roman empire. These passages fuse the two time-frames together, which implicates the past in the construction of the present. In the third chapter specific nodes of intertextuality between the Posthomerica and the Iliad/Odyssey are the primary focus. It is argued that the intertextual web is incomplete, and that the audience must engage their education (paideia) to fill in the narrative gaps. This engages them in creating a Hellenic identity from the narratives of the past with knowledge derived from the present. The fourth chapter contextualizes Quintus with other hexameter poets of the first through fourth centuries CE who treated the Trojan War narrative, including Nestor and Pisander of Laranda, Triphiodorus, and hexameter papyrus fragments.

The Dacian Stones Speak

Author: Paul Lachlan MacKendrick

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Dacia

Page: 248

View: 6383

With this exciting introduction to the ancient province of Dacia, noted classicist and archaeologist MacKendrick turns his attention to an old area little known to the English-speaking world. He examines its history from the Neolithic culture to the 165 years of urban culture under Roman rule. Also examined is the durability of the Greco-Roman heritage that is reflected in the religious and cultural orientation of present-day Romania.

50 Ways to Win at Chess

Author: Steve Giddins

Publisher: Gambit

ISBN: 9781904600855

Category: Games

Page: 173

View: 4974

Presents a collection of chess moves taken from actual tournaments.

The History of Rome

Author: Livy

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Rome

Page: 2278

View: 8818